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Dale Walksler Inducted Into AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame

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The American Motorcycle Association Motorcycle Hall of Fame announced this week that they will add five new inductees at their annual ceremony on December 6 in Columbus, Ohio.

Included in the Class of 2019 is Dale Walksler, founder and curator of Dale’s Wheels Through Time Museum in Maggie Valley, NC. Walksler’s induction to the Hall of Fame pays tribute to his lifelong passion and tireless effort to preserve and promote vintage American motorcycling.’

Walksler’s introduction to American motorcycling came when he bought a wrecked Harley-Davidson Servi-Car from behind a local repair shop. A few weeks later, he rode the machine out of his garage and into a lifelong love of motorcycles. After high school, he opened a motorcycle custom shop and then a Harley-Davidson dealership in 1974. During its 26 years, Dale’s Harley-Davidson of Mt. Vernon was continually recognized as a top 100 dealer, receiving countless awards from Harley-Davidson and industry organizations alike.

Over the years, Walksler continued to add to his personal collection some of the rarest and most historic American motorcycles and collectibles, eventually opening a museum to attract customers to his dealership. When he sold his dealership in 1999, he moved to Maggie Valley, NC to open Dale’s Wheels Through Time Museum. Recognized worldwide for its all-American collection of vintage motorcycles and automobiles, each machine being kept in running and operating condition. The museum has hosted over a million and a half visitors during its seventeen years in North Carolina. Walksler’s legacy includes not only the museum but his own celebrated television show, “What’s In The Barn,” as well as numerous appearances on other programs such as “American Pickers,” “Chasing Classic Cars,” and “American Restoration.”

The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame was started in 1998 and exists to “to honor the legends and heroes of American motorcycling and highlight their achievements and contributions to motorcycling.”

Ken Ford, a member of the AMA board of directors, said, “The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Class of 2019 includes individuals who have impacted motorcycling in positive and powerful ways, as both advocates and sportsmen, leaving a lasting impression on the sport we all love. Generations of motorcyclists owe them a debt of gratitude for their accomplishments. We’re honored to recognize them this December 6 at the induction ceremony as the newest members of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame.”

The other four inductees for 2019 include Mark Buckner, Kurt Caselli, Ron Lechien, and Wiltz Wagner.
Founded in 1924 with a mission to “to promote the motorcycling lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling,” the American Motorcyclist Association now boasts over 200,000 members and in excess of 1,110 chartered clubs.

https://wheelsthroughtime.com/dale-walksler-inducted-into-ama-motorcycle-hall-of-fame/

Kawasaki Sweeps AMA Pro Motocross Championships in the 250 and 450 Classes

By | General Posts

Foothill Ranch, Calif. (August 25, 2019) – The final round of the 2019 AMA Pro Motocross Championship saw Monster Energy®/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki rider Adam Cianciarulo capture his first AMA Pro Motocross 250 title aboard his KX™250 this weekend in Crawfordsville, Indiana. The title is the 15th 250 class motocross championship for Kawasaki, the most 250 class motocross championships of any manufacturer and confirmed the Kawasaki sweep as both teams secured the title in the 250 and 450 classes. Monster Energy® Kawasaki rider Eli Tomac finished the season strong as he went on to capture another overall victory (3-1).

Cianciarulo kicked off the day with a 30-point advantage and lined up for the first moto of the 250 class poised and prepared to fight for the title. As the gate dropped, Cianciarulo positioned himself in fourth around Turn 1. Cianciarulo quickly made his way into third and patiently waited to make his move into second; he knew he needed to finish second in order to clinch the championship and with only three laps remaining, he did just that.

Without the stress of the ultimate goal, Cianciarulo had the luxury of coasting through the final moto but in typical fashion, he charged through the field after the gate dropped on Moto 2. Once again, Cianciarulo sat comfortably in third for the majority of the moto before dropping back into fourth to finish and going on to celebrate the championship with the entire team on the podium. Cianciarulo finished the day with 2-4 moto scores for third overall meaning he never finished off the overall podium this season with 12 straight podiums.

Although the championships was the focus, teammates Garrett Marchbanks and Martin Davalos both had the goal to close out the season on a high note as well. Marchbanks managed to finish 11th in Moto 1, after having to make his way up from 23rd on the first lap. Unfortunately, Davalos was unable to complete the first moto after running into a mechanical issue early on in the race.

Both riders were able to bounce back in Moto 2 as Marchbanks raced to his best finish of the season in seventh, going 11-7 for ninth overall and Davalos captured a top-10 finish for his last 250 class moto, going 39-10 for 16th overall. Marchbanks and Davalos finished 14th and 18th in the 250 class championship points standings, respectively.

“The road to this championship has been a journey. I grew up in the Team Green program and many people had such high expectations but because of injuries, I’ve been unable to fulfill those expectations until now. I wouldn’t change a thing though. I have learned so much, grown as a person and appreciate this moment more than I could have imagined. I’m just so emotional thinking about this accomplishment my entire Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki team and I have achieved; we have worked so hard for this and I really put my mind to it. I wanted this title so badly, now it’s time to celebrate!” – Adam Cianciarulo

“It’s been a challenging season, but I’m proud to have officially wrapped up my second Pro Motocross season. I continue to learn and grow as a person and an athlete, and I look forward to continue working with the team to find even more success.” – Garrett Marchbanks

“There have been a lot of ups and downs and a few challenges I’ve had to overcome this year. I wanted to make sure and give it my all today for my last 250 class ride. I can’t thank Mitch and the team enough for everything they do to support me. They are and have always been in my corner and now I’m just looking forward to what‘s next.” – Martin Davalos

After securing the 450 class championship at the penultimate round last week, Tomac arrived with a relaxed demeanor to take on the final round of the season. As the gate dropped, Tomac and teammate Joey Savatgy launched out the gate aboard their KX™450 motorcycles in front of the 40-rider field. Savatgy nearly grabbed the holeshot and remained in second for the first two opening laps before Tomac made his way around him on Lap 3. Nearly halfway through the moto, Savatgy was passed once more but was determined to hold on to his position from there, crossing the finish line with his best moto finish of the season in fourth. Tomac battled for the lead throughout the moto to ultimately finish third.

Moto 2 in the 450 class saw both KX™ motorcycles out front once again but it was the No. 17 machine of Savatgy who grabbed the holeshot to lead the opening lap. Halfway through the moto, Savatgy was passed by Tomac and four other contenders to drop to sixth, where he went on to finish. However, around that same time Tomac had maneuvered his way to the front to lead the remaining laps of the moto. The newly crowned champion took the checkered flag to capture the last moto win of the season, going 3-1 for his sixth overall victory of the season.

Savatgy returned for the final round after taking the weekend off to celebrate the birth of his first child determined to finish the season strong by riding up front all day and earning his best finish of the season with fourth place overall (4-6). Savatgy finished 11th in the 450 class championship points standings.

The success didn’t end at the track as MX Sports and NBC Sports hosted an end of season banquet, where Kawasaki was awarded multiple awards as well, including the coveted Manufacturer of the Year award and Monster Energy Kawasaki named Team of the Year. Tomac and Cianciarulo’s mechanics were each awarded Mechanic of the Year in the respective classes in addition to Mitch Payton receiving Team Manager of the Year.

“What an incredible day and season it’s been. I came here this weekend feeling fortunate we were able to secure the championship already; that really took all the weight off my shoulders. My goal was to run my race, finish strong and remain healthy, it was just icing on the cake to finish the last round with the overall win. I’m still on cloud nine and can’t thank the entire Monster Energy Kawasaki team enough for everything they have provided me with this year in order to bring home our third championship.“ – Eli Tomac

“Today was an incredible feeling. I finally feel like I was where I’m supposed to be, running up front. I’ve been able to put together decent motos in the last couple of rounds, but I was just feeling it today and the team set me up with an excellent bike to match it.” – Joey Savatgy

 

Kawasaki Doubles Down To Capture AMA Pro Motocross Championships in the 250 and 450 Classes

By | General Posts

Foothill Ranch, Calif. (August 24, 2019) – Monster Energy®/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki rider Adam Cianciarulo captured his first AMA Pro Motocross 250 title aboard his KX™250 this weekend in Crawfordsville, Indiana.

Cianciarulo began his championship campaign by winning the overall in the first four rounds. Cianciarulo’s dominant performance all season long was displayed through his grit, determination, and consistency, never finishing off the overall podium during the season.

The title is the 15th 250 class motorcross championship for Kawasaki, the most 250 class motocross championships of any manufacturer. Monster Energy Kawasaki rider Eli Tomac clinched the 450 class title last weekend at Budds Creek, leading Team Green to the first brand sweep of both motocross classes since Kawasaki achieved the same feat in 2011.

Kawasaki Rider Eli Tomac Captures Third Consecutive Pro Motocross Championship

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Foothill Ranch, Calif. (August 17, 2019) – Monster Energy® Kawasaki rider Eli Tomac and his KX™450 earned his third consecutive AMA Pro Motocross Championship at the penultimate round of the series in Mechanicsville, Maryland. Tomac scored fo five overall wins this season and captured 10 moto wins in total. Tomac cements his legacy as only the fourth rider in history to win three consecutive motocross titles. The title is Kawasaki’s 14th 450 class motocross championship, more than any other manufacturer.

To get it done today and a race early is amazing! Honestly, when I crossed the line I didn’t know I had gotten the championship. To go three championships in a row is pretty special and something I am proud of. Each championship has been special in its own right, but man am I happy we got it done today. I can’t thank the entire Monster Energy Kawasaki crew and the entire Kawasaki motorcycle corporation enough for all of the hard work and support all season long.“ – Eli Tomac

Another Successful Year at Loretta Lynn’s for Kawasaki Team Green

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Foothill Ranch, Calif. (August 5, 2019) – Kawasaki Team Green™ wrapped up the 37th Annual AMA Amateur National Motocross Championships at Loretta Lynn’s Dude Ranch, in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee with plenty to celebrate. Team Green left the ranch with five championships, 11 overall podium finishes, and 14 moto wins.

The Team Green squad of Krystian Janik and Drew Adams contested the 85cc (10-12) and the 85cc (10-12) Limited classes aboard their KX™85 motorcycles. The Team Green duo occupied the podium throughout the week, however, one bad moto for each of them would ultimately hinder their overall results, but they showed they had the speed to compete with the best in the country in the 85cc class. Adams was able to secure second place overall in the 85cc (10-12) Limited class with fellow Team Green rider Thor Powell rounding out the top-5 in fifth.

Ryder DiFrancesco donned the No. 1 on his KX™85 for Team Green in the Mini Sr. 1 class as reigning champion and No. 99 in Mini Sr. 2 class. In the last Mini Sr. 2 moto, DiFrancesco looked poised to grab the championship with his 2-1 moto scores, and rocketed out of the gate to the first corner grabbing the holeshot, but he fell in the ensuing corner. From last position, the California native scratched and clawed his way back to the front of the pack. At the half way point of the race, DiFrancesco had brought the crowd to their feet as he ran the fastest lap of the week in the Mini Sr. classes, four seconds faster than any rider. After moving into third place, a crash on the last lap ultimately dropped him to fifth where 2-1-5 moto scores placed him third overall in the championship standings. Coming into the final moto of the week after suffering some misfortune in the Mini Sr. 1 (12-14) class, DiFrancesco made a statement to his competitors by winning the final moto in dominant fashion.

Stilez Robertson led the charge for Monster Energy Team Green big bike riders aboard his KX™250, battling for wins and championships in both the 250 B and Schoolboy 2 (12-17) B/C divisions. Robertson set the tone early in the week by winning the first 250 B moto and made it known that he was one of the fastest at the ranch in 2019. His consistency throughout the week was what ultimately earned him the championship in the 250 B class with 1-2-2 scores, and 3-5-2 scores in the Schoolboy 2 class that were good enough for second place overall in the championship battle.

Just as he has done all year long at other major amateur nationals, the No. 55 green machine of Dylan Cunha won in dominant fashion throughout the week. In the 250 C class he was able to remain perfect the entire week by sweeping the class with 1-1-1 moto scores. In the 250 C Jr. (12-17) class, a bad crash in his second moto hindered his overall results but was still able to manage a 10th place overall finish in the class.

John Grewe would once again win the Masters 50+ championship for the fourth consecutive year. Grewe also placed his Babbitt’s Online Kawasaki KX™450 on the podium with a second overall in the Senior 40+ class with 2-2-2 scores, while fellow Team Green riders Gregory Pamart and Ryan Valade rounded out the top five behind Grewe.

In the vet classes it was not only about Team Green’s Grewe who had success, in the Senior 45+ class there was a first time Loretta Lynn’s champion crowned by the name of John Bowlin aboard his KX™450. Bowlin sat with a 1-1 score heading into the final moto of the week and was put to the test as the Tennessee skies darkened and the rain began to engulf the track. Despite the conditions, Bowlin was bound and determined to capture his first ever championship and did just that by sweeping the Senior 45+ class with perfect scores. Fellow Team Green rider Don Boespflug joined Bowlin on the podium with 3-5-2 scores, earning a second place overall in the class.

Joining Grewe and Bowlin in the vet championships was Nicholas Hayes who captured the Vet 30+ championship with consistent riding throughout the week. But much like his competitors, he would be forced to overcome adversity. After finishing first and third in his first two motos, Hayes pulled into “Greenville” seeking the aid of the Kawasaki Trackside Support team. The team quickly got him and his machine back to race ready. Hayes went on to win the final moto and the championship, stating “none of this would have been possible without the help yesterday from Kawasaki Team Green’s Trackside support crew. I can’t thank those guys enough!” Fellow Team Green rider Taylor Painter joined in on the action with a third place overall finish in the Vet 30+ class.

“It’s always great coming to Loretta Lynn’s,” said Team Green Manager, Ryan Holliday. “We enjoy catching up with so many of our Kawasaki racers and families from coast to coast. We strive to give them the best experience and support that our Team Green staff can provide. It was awesome to have some of our new lineup of 2020 KX™ and KLX® models out on display all week long for people to come check out.”

Kawasaki Championships and Top-5 Finishes
Loretta Lynn’s AMA Amateur National Motocross Championship:

250 B
1st – Stilez Robertson

250 C
1st – Dylan Cunha

Masters (50+)
1st – John Grewe

Vet (30+)
1st – Nicholas Hayes
3rd – Taylor Painter

Senior (45+)
1st – John Bowlin
2nd – Don Boespflug

Senior (40+)
2nd – John Grewe
4th – Gregory Pamart
5th – Ryan Valade

SchoolBoy 2 (12-17) B/C
2nd – Stilez Robertson

85cc (10-12) Limited
2nd – Drew Adams
5th – Thor Powell

Mini Sr. 1 (13-15)
3rd – Ryder DiFrancesco

Girls (11-16)
4th – Landrey Hazen

New details of Zero SR/F set to compete at Pikes Peak

By | General Posts

With the 2019 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb quickly approaching, Zero Motorcycles has released new details surrounding the preparation of its new SR/F for the race.

Zero’s internal engineering team, in collaboration with several brand partners including Gates Carbon Drive, Showa, Pirelli Tires, SME Group, Dymag and Hotbodies Racing, have transformed the powerful streetfighter into a full-blown racer for the June 30th event. Come race day, AMA-professional racer Cory West will pit the bike against some of the biggest names in the industry, testing adaptations including an upgraded suspension, handlebar-mounted brake levers, custom rearsets and more.

SANTA CRUZ, Calif., (June 20, 2019) – Zero Motorcycles, the brand that defined the category of electric motorcycles, introduced their most innovative and powerful motorcycle yet with the launch of SR/F earlier this year. Now, Zero’s internal engineering team, in collaboration with multiple partners, has transformed its new streetfighter into a full-blown racer, which AMA-professional racer Cory West will put to the test at the 2019 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb on June 30.

“The racing effort for Pikes Pike at Zero is entirely run with internal engineering staff, who mostly commit their lunches, nights, and weekends to the cause,” said Brian Wismann, VP of Product Development at Zero Motorcycles. “No dedicated team members or factory-level budgets here. The bike was built with the support of key suppliers to the Zero production line, plus some clever designs from an engineering team let loose to experiment.”

With 110 horsepower and 140 lb-ft of torque, Zero’s production SR/F already boasts impressive performance stats that challenge competitors representing the biggest names in the industry. Through the company’s “Blue Sky” program, which encourages Zero engineers to explore their creativity and reach for new heights, the SR/F has become an even more formidable contender, thanks in large part to the help of existing brand partners including Gates Carbon Drive, Showa, Pirelli Tires, SME Group, Dymag and Hotbodies Racing.

In lieu of the chain kit typically used for race bikes, Zero engineers opted to stick with the same Gates Carbon Drive belt found on the production model. Their hope is that the smooth delivery of torque from the concentric pivot and constant tension belt will give the SR/F an advantage when pitted against gas bikes, which need to shift and respond to power pulses and surges from internal combustion engines.

In order to upgrade the suspension on the SR/F, Zero tapped Showa for their rare Balance Free Front Fork (BFF) and Balance Free Rear Cushion lite (BFRC-lite) rear shock. The Showa components also serve the dual purpose of adding a contrasting visual accent against the matte black of the bike. Adding utlity and further visual character to the racer, Dymag forged aluminum wheels provide crucial weight savings, plus aesthetic appeal befitting the Pirelli Superbike Slicks fitted to them.

Additional adaptations to the SR/F from Zero’s engineering team include two handlebar-mounted brake levers, which allow for better rear brake modulation while banking deeply into right hand turns – only possible through the clutch-less design of Zero’s direct drive electric motor. Custom rearsets were also designed to accommodate the bike’s unique swingarm pivot, which is concentric with the motor output shaft.

Bringing together the overall concept is designer Tom Zipprian’s custom bodywork, which was 3D printed in-house specifically for Pikes Peak and reinforced with carbon fiber. Large number plates are required per race regulations, and this serves to stylishly accommodate those as well as provide useful data on testing the potential aerodynamic benefits of similar elements that generate downforce.

About Zero Motorcycles

Zero Motorcycles is the global leader in electric motorcycles and powertrains. Designed and crafted by hand in California, Zero Motorcycles combines Silicon Valley technology with traditional motorcycle soul to elevate the motorcycling experience for intelligent, innovative riders around the world.

Motorcycle Clubs and the One Percenter

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It’s no secret that Americans love outlaws, from the legends and lore of rebellious (and illegal) acts by the Founding Fathers, to the bushwhacking and bank-robbing capers of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, to the “bad boy” music of Elvis Presley, the Rolling Stones and Dr. Dre.

American culture and mass media have led inexorably to characters that embody this bad-boy attitude – a recent example being Jax, the heartthrob outlaw biker star of the TV show “Sons of Anarchy”. Western society has a long established canon from which we “learn” about society from fictional dramas. And the more we watch shows like “Sons of Anarchy,” the more a news story will seem to fit our mental construct of “how those people are.” The same is true of popular TV crime dramas’ portrayal of American minorities’ involvement in violent crime. And it seems that every time outlaw motorcycle clubs are portrayed in the news, it’s because of something terrible, such as the deadly events in Waco, Texas. Add to this the fact that the outlaw biker narrative has been largely controlled over time, not by members of the culture, but by outsiders and the misconceptions grow.

The term 1%er was first used in print in the pages of Life Magazine during the 1960’s. The article was a contrived response to an AMA rally in Hollister CA, after encouraging certain individuals to get drunk and ride through town the media then reported on ‘drunken’ motorcycle clubs giving rise to the popular misconception of bikers and also the movie The Wild One. The American Motorcycle Association stated that 99% of the people at their events were God fearing and family oriented. The other 1% were hard riding, hard partying, non mainstream type people. Thus the term 1%er found its place in popular vernacular.

Motorcycle clubs were historically born of a love of the machine, racing, riding and from military service. Gangs began for various reasons as well, but largely as a form of protection for outsiders or ethnic immigrants residing in inner cities. Their social structure is overwhelmingly democratic from the local to the international levels. Officers are democratically elected and hold office so long as they meet the memberships’ needs.

In contrast, Motorcycle Gangs can be seen as more autocratic than democratic, where leaders emerge more for their charismatic leadership and illicit earning abilities than for their abilities to run organisations. Motorcycle clubs are organised hierarchically, with strictly defined chains of command and lines of communication. MCs elect secretaries whose jobs are to maintain meeting minutes, keep track of committees and chairs, and see that old business is complete and new business is on the agenda. Treasurers also are elected officials and they attend to fiduciary responsibilities such as collecting membership dues, paying clubhouse expenses and financial planning for the future. Both secretaries and treasurers are required to produce written documents for the membership to review and approve during each meeting.

It’s not easy becoming a patch-holder. Many have compared “prospecting” – the process of earning full membership – to that of military basic training, where the individual is broken down in order to be reformed into a part of a collective: To think not of one’s self but of others, and to understand that one’s actions or inactions impact the team and the organisation. But prospecting takes months and sometime a year or more (5 years for one MC). Prospecting is physically, emotionally, and intellectually demanding and not everyone can do it. A significant amount of social status is conferred upon those with the steel to make it. Perhaps this is the only obvious similarity between MCs and gangs.

MC is generally reserved for those clubs that are mutually recognised by other MC or outlaw motorcycle clubs. This is indicated by a motorcyclist wearing an MC patch, or a three piece patch called colours, on the back of their jacket or riding vest. Outlaw or 1%er can mean merely that the club is not chartered under the auspices of the AMA, implying a radical rejection of authority and embracing of the “biker” lifestyle as defined and popularised since the 1950s and represented by such media as Easyriders magazine, the work of painter David Mann and others. In many contexts the terms overlap with the usual meaning of “outlaw” because some of these clubs, or some of their members, are recognised rightly or wrongly by law enforcement agencies as taking part in organised crime.

That sense of brotherhood was on display at a funeral for a patch-holder slain at Waco. Members of the Hells Angels, Bandidos, Mongols, Vagos and more than 50 other motorcycle clubs come together in peace to mourn the passing of a man who touched the lives of so many in his community. To them, he was much more than a biker or a patch-holder — he was their Brother, with all the familial love, respect, and honour that that word conveys. Possibly such a gathering has never happened before. This convergence of contrasting MCs was no media stunt. There were no media in the funeral that day (although there was one white, unmarked van, out of which came uniformed men clad in body armour and armed with assault rifles).

Perhaps the singularly most important distinction between outlaw motorcycle clubs and gangs is evidenced through philanthropy. Many motorcycle clubs are closely intertwined with charity work: MC family members are or have been affected by the maladies the charities seek to eradicate, and members of the local community are in legitimate and immediate need. MCs support a wide variety of local, national, and international charities that seek to end disease, poverty and hunger, but especially supported are disabled veterans organisations. Charity is to members of motorcycle clubs as petrol and oil are to their machines. For some, it’s a major reason why they join and stay in MCs.

Clubs have been observed providing 24/7 security at battered women’s shelters, holding motorcycling events such as Poker Runs to raise money for local families whose homes were destroyed by fire or natural disasters, or to help families stricken by some other tragic event get on their feet. If a member of the community is in legitimate need, and the MCs are able to help, they almost always do. Even if it’s just “Passing the Hat,” where patch-holders literally pass around a baseball cap into which members place what cash they can spare. This might not seem like much, but to a family in desperate need of short-term assistance, this can mean the difference between having electricity and water and going without.

The above puts perspective on the recent statement that certain US law enforcement officials and organisations have labeled outlaw motorcycle clubs as a domestic terrorist threat, something is that is obviously more concerning since many of these clubs are made up of veterans who have fought bravely in recent wars for their country.

Last Day for AMA Member Discount Tickets

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AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, featuring Honda in less than one month away! Join us July 5-7 at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, for a weekend filled with vintage racing, the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Bike Show, presented by Old Bike Barn, trials, lots of entertainment and the largest motorcycle swap meet in North America. Learn more at www.amavintagemotorcycledays.com.

AMA Members receive 25 percent off a Weekend Pass and even steeper discounts on single-day passes when you order tickets in advance. The deadline to order your tickets and receive the discount is today, June 8!  Order Tickets to #AMAVMD Today! 

Stay up-to-date on schedules, entertainment, racing, bike shows and more by subscribing to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days E-News!

Monster Energy Kawasaki Leaves Denver with Mile Wide Smiles

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Foothill Ranch, Calif. (April 14, 2019) – Round 15 of Monster Energy® AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship returned to the mile high city of Denver for the first time since 1996. Home-state hero, Monster Energy® Kawasaki rider Eli Tomac and Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki’s Adam Cianciarulo both captured victories at Broncos Stadium at Mile High in their respective classes, each earning their fifth win of the 2019 season.

With frigid temperatures and snow flurries throughout the day, Tomac kicked the day off by pushing through the snow and qualifying with the fastest lap time while his teammate Joey Savatgy was close behind in third. The Kawasaki teammates came out in front of the pack in 450SX Heat 2 with Savatgy in second and Tomac in fourth. Tomac challenged his title contender as they raced side-by-side for multiple laps until finally the No. 3 KX™450 of Tomac made a clean pass and continued making his move to the front. By Lap 7, Tomac was able to catch Savatgy and pass him for second, where he would go on to cross the finish line. Savatgy fell back to finish fourth.

As the gate dropped on the 450SX Main Event, Savatgy launched out of the gate to another second position start, while Tomac was not far behind in fifth. Similar to the heat race, there were great battles going on up front where Savatgy held a top-3 position before being passed by his teammate and two others, but still earning another impressive top-5 finish. Meanwhile, the crowd came to life as the Colorado native was riding with confidence, resulting in a dominant performance; nearly three minutes into the race, Tomac had blasted by each rider in front of him and began checking out from the rest of the field. Tomac went on to lead the remaining 23 laps and crossed the finish line with nearly an eight-second margin of victory.

Despite the roller coaster weather, over 50,000 Colorado fans filled the stadium and made sure to extend their warm welcome back to the city as they stood on their feet all night chanting “Tomac!” With the encouragement from the crowd, Tomac was able to gain some valuable points and now sits in second place, 18 points out of the top spot in the 450SX Rider Point Standings with two rounds remaining.

#3 Eli Tomac
1st Place

“Wow, tonight was like something I dreamed of; this was the loudest crowd I have ever heard and it was so special for me to kind of repay them with this win. It has been such a great weekend and I mean, it wouldn’t be Colorado without some snow! I’m thankful for my entire Monster Energy Kawasaki crew and proud of all the progress we’ve made throughout the season. We’ll continue to work hard and keep pushing to close the gap on the title for the next two rounds, it’s not over yet!”
– Eli Tomac

#17 Joey Savatgy
5th Place

“I wasn’t sure how this weekend was going to go after hurting my shoulder last weekend, but I was determined to get back out there and give it my all. It wasn’t easy, but overall I’m proud to put Kawasaki up front again and thankful for my team’s support. I got more experience running up front with the top contenders and I’m still shooting for a podium finish, but another top-5 is good, especially given the circumstances. I’m looking forward to a weekend off and allowing myself to rest up and get ready for New Jersey.”
– Joey Savatgy

In the 250SX class, the Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki riders also rode great in qualifying with Cianciarulo clocking the fastest lap time and Garrett Marchbanks with eighth position. Cianciarulo carried that speed into Heat 2 as he started in third, quickly took over the lead by Lap 4 and then went on to take the checkers.

The 250SX Main Event saw Cianciarulo running in second, stalking the leader and strategically maneuvering his KX™250 to find his way around. He played cat and mouse for a few laps before making the pass stick and going on to lead the remaining 15 laps. Cianciarulo secured his fifth win of the season and extending his lead in the 250SX Western Region Rider Point Standings with only the East/West Shootout in Las Vegas remaining in the series.

Marchbanks struggled throughout the night and was forced to compete in the Last Chance Qualifier (LCQ) after not being able to finish his heat race. He went on to lead every lap and get the job done in the LCQ. Despite a poor gate pick for the Main Event, Marchbanks rocketed off the start and nearly grabbed the holeshot, but unfortunately collided with another rider mid-air before the first lap was complete causing an early end to his night.

Cianciarulo and Tomac’s win in both 250SX and 450SX classes in Denver give Kawasaki their fifth event sweep of the season.

#92 Adam Cianciarulo
1st Place

“I am so pumped to get this win! I felt so good all day and just synced with my KX250 perfectly tonight, so it ended up being such a good race. Plus, the energy of this crowd here in Denver was incredible throughout the race. I love this type of racing where we’re all throwing it out on the line and the crowd is going crazy, especially since we’re close in points. Now I just have to get the job done in Vegas.”
– Adam Cianciarulo

#61 Garrett Marchbanks
22nd Place

“I’m thankful I’m not badly injured and I’ve got a great team that will help me get back to where I need to be. I know where I belong out there and we’ve made a lot of progress this season. I’ve learned a lot, so I’m looking forward to finishing out the season in Las Vegas in a few weeks. ”
– Garrett Marchbanks

Kawasaki Sweeps Monster Energy Supercross in Nashville

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Foothill Ranch, Calif. (April 7, 2019) – Round 14 of Monster Energy® AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship hosted its inaugural race in Nashville, Tennessee at Nissan Stadium. Monster Energy® Kawasaki rider Eli Tomac and Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki’s Martin Davalos both captured wins in their respective classes earning Kawasaki a clean sweep on the night.

It was a roller coaster day for the No. 3 machine of Tomac aboard his KX™450 as he pulled off his own version of the “Music City Miracle” in Nashville. Tomac started out the day struggling to find his rhythm during practice and would qualify in sixth position heading into the night program. In the first 450SX heat race, Tomac quickly passed into the lead in the opening laps and began to check out, however due to unfortunate circumstances Tomac was unable to finish the race, sending him to the Last Chance Qualifier (LCQ). Being put into unfamiliar territory by racing in the 450SX LCQ was not going to stop Tomac as he made quick work of the competition and won the LCQ. Regardless of a poor gate position as the result of qualifying through the LCQ, Tomac put himself in a strong position off the start of the Main Event. He quickly began to capitalize on his competitors’ mistakes and worked his way into the lead with 12 minutes to go. From there he rode a consistent race, building more than 11-second lead to cross the checkered flag as the first-ever 450SX Main Event winner in Nashville, Tennessee.

Joey Savatgy began the day qualifying in fourth position. In the 450SX Heat Race 1, Savatgy found himself near the front and he was able to make a clean pass for the lead and go on to win his second career 450 class heat race. In the 450SX Main Event, Savatgy found himself in similar territory, sitting in second place looking to make another move into first, but he landed off a triple right into a slick spot where he tucked the front in and augured into the ground and ending his night.

The King of Supercross, Jeremy McGrath made a special guest appearance at the inaugural race in Nashville, Tennessee where he joined fellow Kawasaki riders Tomac and Savatgy for opening ceremonies. McGrath even put on a show for the crowd by throwing a signature Nac-Nac during the opening ceremonies parade lap aboard his KX450.

In the 250SX class, it was Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki rider, Davalos who found some magic in the music city as he won his first 250SX heat race and first 250SX main event of the 2019 season. This win marked Davalos’ fifth 250SX career win as he became the first ever 250SX winner in Nashville and extends Kawasaki’s win streak in the 250 SX East Region.

Davalos started the day out strong with a second place in qualifying, placing him in the first race of the night in the 250SX Heat Race 1. Davalos nabbed the holeshot and never looked back as he went on to win the race. In the 250SX Main Event, Davalos once again was off to a strong start in third place and by the end of Lap 1, he would capitalize on a mistake from the two competitors in front of him, where he would take the lead never looking back and ride a clean and consistent race, to the finish.

It was a tough day for the current 250SX Eastern Region points leader, Austin Forkner, as he suffered an injury from a crash in practice that ultimately sidelined him for the night program. Forkner and the team elected to sit out for the night so that he could be fully prepared for the final two rounds of the championship hunt. Forkner retains the points lead and the red plate going into New Jersey.