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Red Cross Philippines vows faster, more effective response with motorcycles

By General Posts

from https://mb.com.ph by Dhel Nazario

The Philippine Red Cross vowed on Saturday, Dec. 11, to provide a more effective humanitarian response now that it is more equipped after receiving motorcycles donated by Honda Philippines Inc.

PRC Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Sen. Richard Gordon gave this assurance to the public during the ceremonial distribution of Honda motorcycle units to local Red Cross chapters in North Luzon, Central Luzon, South Luzon, Bicol, Visayas, and Mindanao clusters.

Gordon expressed his gratitude to Honda Philippines Inc. President Susumu Mitsuishi for the carmaker’s turnover of 104 motorcycles, complete with insulated top box.

“These motorcycles will level-up the capacity of PRC’s fleet for responding to emergencies. The PRC is now more equipped to provide speedy and effective responses during disasters, public health crises, and other situations that require humanitarian aid,” Gordon said.

Gordon also thanked respected automotive industry parts supplier Eddie Jose as he assured the group of the PRC’s commitment to use the assets to protect the public’s well-being, health, and to save lives.

“Each PRC chapter will use these new motorcycles to ensure faster and easier access to blood, saliva RT-PCR testing, and soon, even first aid assistance. These motorcycles will enable PRC volunteers and staff to quickly reach areas that would be inaccessible to larger vehicles.” Gordon said.

He also reiterated that PRC personnel assigned to use the motorcycles will undergo a series of safety trainings that will enable them to properly handle and operate the units safely especially during high-stress, high-pressure situations.

“The humanitarian situations faced by PRC riders will range from the routine to the extreme. This makes it a priority for us to train volunteers and staff on the safe and proper handling of these vehicles especially during high-stress incidents. We are a staunch advocate of road safety and I want our volunteers and staff to achieve a high level of skill and safety in their use of these motorcycles,” he said.

The initial phase of the training is composed of three hours of classroom lectures and three hours of practical motorcycle handling. Further training will be given as needed to the PRC staff and volunteers.

Mid-South M.I.L.E. 2021

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Bikers gathered in Dallas, Texas for the 29th annual Mid-South M.I.L.E. event

from Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF)

Like the Midwest’s Heartland STEAM event, the Mid-South M.I.L.E. brings together bikers from neighboring states to discuss legislative priorities, share ideas and build relationships.

CLICK HERE To Read this Event Coverage on Bikernet.com

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Fritzie Baer Trophy for service to Laconia Motorcycle Week Rally

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from Laconia Motorcycle Week Assoc.

The 2021 Fritzie Baer trophy for above and beyond service to Laconia Motorcycle Week Motorcycle Rally has been awarded to Don Hamme of Erie, PA.

For the past fifteen years, Hamme has been a promoter of Motorcycle Week throughout the Western PA, Western New York and Eastern Ohio region giving talks, making calls and distributing the Rally News to motorcycle enthusiasts. Hamme is a tireless booster for the rally. At times, showing his dedication through acts such as meeting a train at 4:30am and lugging hundreds of pounds of magazines through the train station.

Recently, Charlie St. Clair, Executive of the Laconia Motorcycle Week Association, drove 1,000 miles round-trip to Erie, PA to surprise Hamme with the trophy as Hamme was unable to attend this year’s rally. St. Clair commented, “It was the least we could do for Hamme because of the dedication he has shown to the Rally.”

The Fritzie Baer Trophy was first awarded in 1996 and has been received by the likes of Governor John Lynch, Peter Makris of the Naswa Resort, Laconia Mayor Ed Engler and Laconia Police Chief Matt Canfield over the past 20 years, just to name a few.

Fritzie Baer was a true booster for the Rally leading the Red Hat Brigade, a group of supporters who raised funds to put on the Rally. Baer was the lead charge for the Rally and is credited with bringing the AMA Road Champion Races to Laconia in 1938.

Motorcycle Mentorship Safety Day was hosted by the U.S. Army

By General Posts

from https://www.army.mil

Kick off the riding season with Motorcycle Mentorship Safety Day

VILSECK, Germany – Motorcycle Mentorship Safety Day was hosted by the U.S. Army Garrison Bavaria Safety Office on Friday, May 14. This event consisted of morning riding drills at the Vilseck Airfield and an afternoon group mentorship ride off-post.

“We are really happy that we can hold the event this year, because it was unfortunately canceled last year due to increased COVID-19 density rates in the surrounding area,” said USAG Bavaria Safety Director Deborah Gonzales. “This event brings the installation together. It promotes mentorship, and it allows people the opportunity to have safe fun.”

To kick-off the event, USAG Bavaria Commander Col. Christopher Danbeck shared a few opening remarks.

“Have a lot of fun, and be safe out there,” Danbeck told the attendees. “Mentorship for motorcycle riders is very important. When you go back to your organizations, please continue to watch over the younger guys. You know the real deal – how to stay safe.”

He also drew the winning raffle tickets for five Harley Davidson T-Shirt prizes.

Then the group received a blessing from USAG Bavaria Chaplain Col. Shawn McCammon.

Before starting the hands-on drills, vehicle inspections were performed by a professional mechanic from the 405th Army Field Support Brigade, safety briefings were conducted by garrison safety officers, and course exercises were demonstrated by volunteer mentor coaches.

Participants then rotated between four different stations to practice components of total stopping distance, obstacle avoidance and evasive maneuvers. After each drill, riders received additional performance feedback from the mentor coaches.

A break was scheduled between the morning and afternoon sessions to allow riders an opportunity to eat lunch and refuel their motorcycles. And before departing for the 120 kilometer group ride off-post, Eschenbach Police Station Polizeihauptmeister Paul Zawal provided the group with one last refresher on German road laws and motorcycle safety. He also took questions at the end of his presentation.

USAG Bavaria Motorcycle Safety Day was open to all Department of Defense cardholding motorcyclists, which includes installations at Grafenwoehr, Vilseck, Hohenfels and Garmisch. Even motorcyclists from U.S. Army Garrison Ansbach partook in the event.

“We [motorcyclists] have a very tight knit group since there are only so many riders in the military community,” said Master Sgt. Robert Lewis, motorcycle safety program coordinator of 18th Military Police Brigade, 21st Theater Sustainment Command. “At the start of the season, it is all about refreshing basic skills, remembering safety protocols and building comradery.”

The Safety Office is looking for rider coaches, mentors and volunteers to assist the program. For more details on motorcycle safety, or if you want to foster a mentorship program within your unit, visit the USAG Bavaria safety website or contact the office at DSN 526-2303, CIV 09641-70-526-2303.

View more photos from 2021 Motorcycle Safety Day, here: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmVFeEi2

Canton veteran who lost leg rides again thanks to customized motorcycle

By General Posts

by Kelly Byer from https://www.cantonrep.com

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer get back on the road.

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer ride a motorcycle for the first time in eight years.

More importantly, he said, the fall program renewed his faith in humanity.

“I was left for dead on the side of the road,” he said. “So, during my time in this last seven or eight years, I have lost a lot of faith in people. A lot.”

In 2011, a drunken driver pulled in front of Zollicoffer’s 1995 Kawasaki motorcycle on state Route 800. The now retired U.S. Marine Corps and Army National Guard veteran had completed three tours in Iraq and was scheduled for deployment to Afghanistan.

Another person came across the early morning wreck and stopped to help. Zollicoffer, a 53-year-old Canton resident, spent months in a coma and had his left leg amputated at the hip.

This past Veteran’s Day, he received a modified trike at the Makers For Veterans closing ceremony. His family’s safety concerns had kept Zollicoffer from pursuing a costly trike, but they talked and accepted what it meant to him beforehand.

He’s taken a few rides.

“I can’t even describe the feeling, when you get that wind blowing through your hair,” joked Zollicoffer, who has a shaved head.

Makers for Veterans

The Colorado-based nonprofit Challenge America began the Makers for Veterans program (CAMVETS) in 2019. It brought together volunteers with various expertise to solve challenges posed by veterans.

Dallas Blaney, executive director of Challenge America, said the inspiration came from a similar initiative in Israel. Challenge America members participated in the international program and wanted to recreate the experience in the United States.

Blaney described it as “human-centered design applied to the veterans space.” The process begins by asking participants, selected from across the nation, what they want to do that they haven’t been able to.

“That forces the veterans to frame their challenges in a positive way,” Blaney said.

A team — built “from scratch” — with skills relevant to the individual’s challenge then meet at a kickoff event. That is followed by about eight weeks of planning and work culminating in a three-day workshop.

CAMETS then works with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other partners to identify prototypes to patent and undergo additional product development.

“So that we can get those promising solutions out to market where other veterans and civilians, too, can benefit from these things,” Blaney said.

CAMVETS coordinated a spring and fall program. From 17 total projects, Blaney said, the partners produced 15 working prototypes and, so far, filed for five provisional patents.

Blaney said a digital service dog application designed to help a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder is expected to be the first product ready for market.

Both programs were held in the Cleveland area, not far from where Blaney grew up. He said the region has a great blend of medical, manufacturing, entrepreneurial, academic and innovative institutions.

The Cleveland Clinic, Bio Enterprise and St. Edward High School are some of CAMVETS’ partners.

“It just seemed like such an amazing fit, and it’s a very friendly place to do business,” Blaney said.

The nonprofit likely will host another program in Northeast Ohio this year, but only one. He said CAMVETS plans to expand to a new city.

Zollicoffer’s custom trike

De Ann Williams, executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission, heard about a CAMVETS opening during a conference and nominated Zollicoffer. It was the first she’d heard about the organization, but she thought the program might produce a longer-lasting prosthetic leg.

Zollicoffer used to play basketball and entered the program thinking he’d leave with a prosthetic for athletic activities.

“With the level of my amputation, that was close to impossible,” he said. “So they started asking questions.”

Zollicoffer, who grew up riding motorcycles, then told his team he’d like to ride again.

“As a motorcycle enthusiast myself, I understood and respected that,” Williams said.

Zollicoffer worked ’hand-in-hand” with his team as the plan evolved — from modifying his prosthetic leg to modifying a three-wheeled motorcycle. However, he said he wasn’t privy to the end product until the Veteran’s Day reveal.

When he was asked to visit a Harley Davidson store as the project wound down, Zollicoffer began to wonder if he’d get a new trike. He later learned that sitting on a $35,000 motorcycle was more for measurement.

The engineers, students and other makers on Team Z turned a two-wheel 1972 Harley Davidson into a trike by replacing the rear portion with wheels from a 1978 Mustang. They also moved the typical, left-side motorcycle gears to the right.

“So, it was a totally customized job,” Zollicoffer said.

Community comes together

After he saw the trike, Zollicoffer saw the executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission.

“I turned around and there’s De Ann standing there,” he said. “That’s when it became clear to me that the whole outreach team got together and they did this thing.”

CAMVETS has paid the “lion share” of most projects, Blaney said. The local commission, though, was tasked with raising $5,000 to buy the bike, which was complemented by donated parts.

Williams said she believes the plan to have the bike donated didn’t work out, so the commission reached out to area service organizations. They had the money within a few days.

“I was just beside myself,” she said. “I couldn’t believe the community came together like that.”

The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Chapter 38 was the major donor. Others were American Legion Post 548, American Veterans Post 124, and Coyote Motorsports.

DAV Commander David May said the project aligned with the group’s mission to assist disabled veterans.

“We’re happy to do it,” he said.

Those involved with CAMVETS said they were glad to learn of the program and plan to volunteer or recommend it to other veterans in the future. Zollicoffer said he made “lifelong friends.”

“We’ll definitely stay in touch with CAMVETS,” Williams said. “I think that that’s definitely going to be a partnership that I hope lasts for a long time.”

American biker gang destroys dog fight rings and rescues animals from violent owners

By General Posts

Angels doesn’t look pretty, you might say about these tattooed bikers. However, they saved countless animal lives all over the country. They even set up an organization, Rescue Ink, and their main goal is to save as many animals as possible. They investigate cases of animal abuse, save pets from their violent owners and help the animals to find new homes.

Rescue Ink is a non-profit organization who fights for animal rights. All volunteers, the team members are bikers, bodybuilders, former military personnel, police detectives, and even lawyers.

“Some people like to think of us as superheroes. The truth is, we are super animal lovers. Through the years, and through many caseloads, obstacles, and downright challenges, we remain strong and dedicated to our mission,” they said.

They made agreements with animal shelters and public organization and they cooperated with the authorities to reduce and even stop animal abuse. Regular people and even famous artists joined their cause. So far, these kind people managed to offer a much better life for a lot of animals, as dogs, cats, horses, pigs and even fish.

And when those heros don’t save animals, they’re teaching children to be kind and lovely with animals. They actually try to prove and to teach everyone that animal abuse is so wrong.

“Let’s just say an official goes to an abuser’s house, he pulls up in a cop car and, immediately the abuser knows the cop’s limitations, he has certain boundaries. But when we pull up, they don’t know what we’re going to do, they don’t know what we’re capable of doing. So it helps out big time,” teh team said in an interview with People.

These guys are real heros!