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Royal Enfield Reveals Scram 411

By General Posts

ROYAL ENFIELD REVEALS ALL-NEW SCRAM 411 ADV CROSSOVER

Ready. Set. Scram!

Milwaukee, WI (Tuesday, March 15, 2022) – Royal Enfield, the global leader in the midsize (250cc – 750cc) motorcycling segment, today unveiled the Scram 411 – the brand’s first ADV crossover. The new Scram 411 is an engaging, accessible and capable street scrambler, with the heart of an adventure motorcycle. Built on Royal Enfield’s proven 411cc single-cylinder engine platform and the Harris Performance chassis, the Scram 411 combines spirited agility on urban streets, with competent rough-roading capabilities. Focused and purposeful changes in the riding geometry and ergonomics make it ideal for in-city riding, as well as unpredictable, challenging trails off the urban grid.

Unveiled for global audiences today, the new Scram 411 is already available in India, and will be available in Europe, Asia Pacific, North America and Latin America later this year. The Scram 411 is scheduled to arrive in the U.S. late summer/early fall. Pricing and colorways will be announced in the coming months.

The Scram 411 is a continuation of Royal Enfield’s constant pursuit of exploration, and building motorcycles to enable every adventure. One such motorcycle is the Himalayan—Royal Enfield’s flagship adventure tourer. Launched in 2016, the Himalayan has fostered a subculture of adventure touring around the world, most recently, even Antarctica’s South Pole. Its unique design and well-rounded capability make it among Royal Enfield’s best-selling motorcycles, and it is upon this stalwart platform that the style evolution continues with the more urban-focused ADV-crossover motorcycle—the Scram 411.

The all-new Scram 411 is a new subspecies that has the authentic vibes of a scrambler and adventure touring in its DNA. With long-travel suspension and class-leading ground clearance paired with a 19-inch front wheel and 17-inch rear, the Scram 411 is playfully agile on city streets, yet is highly capable of tackling more rugged terrain, so the exploration doesn’t end when the pavement stops.

Siddhartha Lal, Managing Director, Eicher Motors Ltd., simply loves the fluidity and the
multipurpose ability of the Scram 411. Speaking about this in the context of modern existence, he said, “Whether it’s London, New Delhi or Tokyo, the contours of modern urban existence are ever-changing. With our world increasingly becoming more fast-paced, life in the urban context has become about the weekday hustle and the weekend getaway, and everything in between. We wanted to build a motorcycle that could effortlessly navigate this entire gamut, and be the perfect ally for the young, modern-day rider. The Scram 411 is truly a motorcycle made for now, and is always ready to tackle whatever surprise is in store.”

Speaking about the inspiration behind the Scram 411, and about the new motorcycle, Executive Director,
Royal Enfield, B Govindarajan, said, “The globally lauded versatility and competence of the Himalayan inspired us to reimagine the motorcycle in a more young, modern-day, urban context. The Scram 411 is the perfect crossover for young city-dwellers, who prefer a motorcycle that is fun and engaging to ride around the city, yet has a rugged appeal. By shifting the riding geometry to make the motorcycle more at home on busy city streets, and retaining its strong ability to take on rough roads and take on the weekend dirt trail, we’ve brought a unique subcategory for consumers. Like all our motorcycles, the Scram 411 is built for the global rider, and manufactured with world-class engineering. We also have an array of genuine motorcycle accessories and a vibrant apparel range inspired by the Scram lifestyle. This is a very exciting and spirited new motorcycle, and we are confident that young riders from across the world will love the new Scram 411.”

Mark Wells, Chief of Design at Royal Enfield, enjoys riding the Scram 411, and loves how easily it can navigate a wide spectrum of terrain and challenges. Speaking about creating a new subspecies of motorcycles, he said, “Most scrambler motorcycles focus only on aesthetics and looks. When we began work on the Scram 411, we were determined to create a motorcycle that would be distinct in design and purpose, and bring the best of rough-road capability to urban riding. With its distinctive look and design, playful colorways, accessible riding proposition, the Scram 411 is an ultimate ADV crossover for the urban environment.”

ROYAL ENFIELD SCRAM 411 – DETAILS & SPECIFICATIONS

The Scram 411 is powered by the globally appreciated 411cc, fuel-injected, 4-stroke, SOHC, air-cooled single-cylinder engine. The counterbalanced engine ensures smooth power delivery and strong bottom-end torque that elevates the overall performance. The wide spread of useable power makes it easy to manage over long urban commutes with minimum gear shifts, and the confidence-inspiring low-revving torque allows it to tackle bad road, and off-road sections easily.

Long-travel suspension and monoshock design, together with class-leading 7.8 inches (200mm) of ground clearance, the Scram 411 delivers a smooth and comfortable ride. The telescopic front suspension with 41mm forks and 7.4 inches (190mm) travel, pairs with 7.0 inches (180mm) travel on the rear, where the link-mounted monoshock enables stable and confident riding over rough roads. Front and rear disc brakes combined with dual-channel ABS, ensures confident braking.

The change in the riding geometry is brought about by the 19-inch front wheel and dual-purpose tire. This, combined with the 17-inch rear wheel, are key to the Scram 411 motorcycle’s nimble handling. The dual-purpose tires ensure a confident grip over tarmac and loose gravel for the ideal combination of on-road grip and rough-road tractability.

The seat on the new Scram 411 is designed for comfort over long saddle time. The single seat that reflects the urban styling of the motorcycle, offers great comfort for both rider and passenger. The accessible 31.2-inch (795mm) seat height enables and easy reach to the ground, making it easy to maneuver in stop-and-go traffic.

The Scram 411 features a new digital-analog instrument cluster that provides easy access to essential information. Circumvented by a traditional analog speedometer, the Scram retains this classic style element, also making for easy viewing.

WATCH THE Live Launch of the Royal Enfield Scram 411

More details, information and specifications on the North America-spec Royal Enfield Scram 411 ADV crossover motorcycle, including colorways, options, genuine accessories and pricing, will be released in the coming months. U.S. arrival is anticipated in late summer/early spring.

#readysetscram #scram411 #royalenfieldscram

About Royal Enfield
The oldest motorcycle company in continuous production in the world, Royal Enfield made its first motorcycle in 1901.

Royal Enfield North America (RENA) is headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and is developing a growing network of more than 140 dealers in North America, including the contiguous U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico. RENA currently offers the all-new Meteor 350, Himalayan and the 650 Twins (INT 650 and Continental GT 650) motorcycles, along with a range of Genuine Motorcycle Accessories and apparel.

For more information on Royal Enfield North America, visit www.RoyalEnfield.com/us/en/, www.Instagram.com/RoyalEnfield_NA, www.Facebook.com/RoyalEnfieldNorthAmerica.

Spec Showdown: Harley-Davidson Sportster S Vs. Indian Scout

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

An American middleweight melee.

For decades, the Harley-Davidson Sportster dominated the American middleweight V-twin class, mostly by dint of being the only American middleweight V-twin. Without a top contender to challenge its reign, the Motor Company only issued modest upgrades since 1986. However, that all changed when the Indian Scout burst onto the scene in 2015.

Heavily based on the Victory Octane, the revived Scout paired Indian’s rich heritage with thoroughly modern equipment. The liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,133cc V-twin was the antithesis of Harley’s ancient air-cooled Evo engine. Compared to the Sportster’s signature teardrop tank and engine cooling fins, the Scout’s low-slung stance and neo-bobber aesthetic presented a viable alternative to Harley’s aging platform.

Facing a formidable foe and new emissions regulations, the Bar and Shield telegraphed its counterpunch when it revealed the Custom 1250 in July, 2018. Nearly three years later, that haymaker finally landed when Harley officially announced the 2021 Sportster S.

Complete with a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,252cc V-twin, the new Sportster’s spec sheet now stands toe-to-toe with the Scout. Of course, we won’t know who wins the battle in the showroom until the Sportster S arrives at dealerships. For now, however, the tale of the tape tells a fascinating story.

Overview
2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S – Vs – 2021 Indian Scout

Middleweight Might
Featuring Harley’s shiny new Revolution Max 1250T, the 2021 Sportster now produces 121 horsepower and 94 lb-ft of torque. While the Scout previously set performance benchmarks for the category with 100 horsepower and 72 lb-ft of torque, Indian’s entry cruiser now looks outgunned. Of course, the Revolution Max V-twin touts a larger displacement, which helps the Sportster S steal that performance feather from Indian’s cap.

On top of that power deficit, the Scout lugs around 59 extra pounds, weighing in at 561 pounds compared to the Sportster’s 502-pound wet weight. Straightline acceleration and top speed define a motorcycle not, but agility goes to the Hog as well. With a 59.8-inch wheelbase, fully adjustable USD fork, and a linkage-equipped monoshock, the Sportster S outmaneuvers the Scout’s 62-inch wheelbase, conventional front end, and dual rear shocks.

Indian does outfit the Scout with a 16-inch wheelset shod in sticky Pirelli Night Dragon rubber while Harley opts for a 16-inch rear and 17-inch front. We could surmise that the smaller wheelset gives the Scout a handling edge if it weren’t for the Sportster’s specially-developed Dunlop GT503 tires. Thanks to an aggressive profile and sticky compound, the Dunlops compensate for the Sportster’s larger front wheel, helping to deliver a 34-degree lean angle compared to the Scout’s 29 degrees.

Novice-Friendly
Though Indian no longer holds the performance edge, the Scout still has a fighting chance. At 29.6 inches, the 2021 Sportster’s perch is a full four inches about the Scout’s 25.6-inch seat height. Most riders won’t have an issue with the Sporty’s seat height, which sags to 28.9-inches in the saddle, but even less will have problems with Indian’s low-slung seat. Of course, novice and inseam-challenged riders benefit most from a low seat height and the Scout is good option for that reason.

Conversely, Indian only offers optional ABS on the Scout while the Harley flaunts rider aids like traction control, cornering ABS, ride modes, and engine braking settings. On top of the full electronics suite, the Motor Company’s new round, four-inch TFT display also outshines the Scout’s analog speedometer and digital tachometer combo. Of course, you could reason the Scout’s spartan accommodations help beginners learn the ropes with a less cumbersome system, but it’s usually better to have rider aids and not need them as opposed to the other way around.

If we’re going to make any case for beginner-appropriate features, however, it should start with the brakes, and the Sportster delivers yet again. Championing a full Brembo braking system with a radially mounted four-piston front caliper, floating single-pot rear binder, and master cylinder, the Sportster S stops surprisingly well. On the other hand, the Scout’s single two-piston caliper up front and single-piston clamper in the rear don’t deliver as much stopping power as its counterpart.

The Final Decision:
Though the 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S walks away with nearly every round in its pocket, we still have to consider one very important detail: price. At $14,999, the souped-up Sporty is $3,000 over the Scout’s MSRP. Coupled with a 121-horsepower V-twin, Harley’s asking price could easily put the Sportster S out of most beginner’s grasp. When price is taken into account, the two cruisers stack up much more evenly, and may even cater to different customers/budgets.

With that said, we can’t wait to see how the Sportster and Scout duke it out in the future. Will Indian fight back with an even punchier V-twin? Will Harley offer a cheaper Sportster option without diluting too much performance? The middleweight cruiser class is a much more competitive environment these days, and we can’t wait to see Sportster and Scout continue to battle it out in the future.