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Vance & Hines New Sidewinder Exhaust System for Suzuki Hayabusa Drag Racers

By General Posts

Vance & Hines Reveals New Sidewinder Exhaust System for Suzuki Hayabusa Drag Racers

Santa Fe Springs CA – March 31, 2022 – Vance & Hines today announced the ultimate exhaust for Suzuki Hayabusa drag racing machines, the new 4-2-1 Sidewinder Exhaust, another step forward in the partnership the company has with Suzuki Motors USA.

The new system is designed for drag race-use on Suzuki Hayabusa models from 1999 to today. Its 4 to 2 to 1 configuration is the ultimate design for peak horsepower, particularly for higher displacement or heavily modified engines, including those running nitrous set-ups, but will still provide good gains on milder set-ups as well.

The exhaust is manufactured of lightweight 304 stainless steel, so it weighs only 14 pounds, a reduction of 30 pounds from the 44-pound stock system. It includes tapered head pipes and full merge collectors for maximum performance. The system also includes features that allow it to be adapted for whatever level of performance an owner/racer is seeking. This includes oxygen sensor bungs and an optional baffle so that the pipe can be adjusted to meet a broad range of performance mods. Suggested retail price is $1799.99.

“This is another great product from the Vance & Hines team at our Racing Development Center,” said Vance & Hines President Mike Kennedy. “The performance capabilities of this system and the vast number of Hayabusa-mounted drag racers should make this a winner for the riders and for Vance & Hines.”

The Sidewinder exhaust system is included in the Vance & Hines continency sponsorship program for the XDA drag racing series.

The new pipes are available immediately from the Vance & Hines Racing Development Center at 317-852-9057 or rdc@vanceandhines.com.

Technical Features

  • Lightweight 304 stainless steel construction (.049″ wall thickness) with brushed finish
  • Tapered head pipes and full merge collectors for maximum performance
  • “Competition Only” Riveted Vance & Hines Logo Badge
  • Slip-fit collector joints with dual swivel end retention springs
  • Tuned length megaphone with optional baffle available (headers are 1-5/8″ tapered to 1-7/8″, 4-into-2 collectors are 1-7/8″ to 2-1/8″, final 2-into-1 collector 2-1/8″ to 3″, megaphone tapered from 3″ to 3-1/2″ then stepped to 4″)
  • Two, 18mm oxygen sensor bungs for stock O2 sensors or wideband air/fuel ratio monitoring.
  • Weighs only 14 pounds, 30 pounds lighter than the stock Hayabusa exhaust.
  • Includes exhaust port flanges, oil cooler bypass kit and spring puller tool
  • Fits all years 1999-2022
  • Lower fairing modification required; adhesive cut-out template supplied

Learn more about the company’s history and products at www.vanceandhines.com.

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Indian Motorcycle introduces 2022 Lineup

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  • Indian Motorcycle introduces 2022 Lineup featuring Updated Technology.
  • New Ride Command Update, Adaptive Headlight for Scout.
  • All-New Accessories for Cruiser, Bagger & Touring.
  • Prices, Paint and Specs announced.

“Rider feedback continues to be at the forefront of what drives refinements and enhancements for our model year offerings, and that is once again the case for 2022. With the help of customer feedback, we aim to consistently enhance and improve the lineup with new technology and wider-ranging accessory options like these for 2022.” – Mike Dougherty, President for Indian Motorcycle

CLICK HERE To See the Full 2022 Indian Motorcycle Lineup Info and Photos.

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Motorcycle dealers in Canada blame rising insurance for drop in sales

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Robb Hertzog, owner of Prairie Harley Davidson in Regina, inside their showroom.

by Gillian Francis from https://leaderpost.com

“I’m not going to say it’s all because of SGI, but I’d say three-quarters of it is.”

In just over three years, Robb Hertzog, owner of the Regina motorcycle dealership Prairie Harley Davidson (click here), estimates he’s lost well over $1 million worth of sales.

“I’m not going to say it’s all because of SGI, but I’d say three-quarters of it is,” he said in an interview Thursday, adding that skyrocketing insurance rates for motorcycles are leading to a decline in the amount of customers he receives.

Hertzog is one of many business owners in the motorcycle industry who have voiced concerns about the increasing expenses for bike owners. SGI is considering upping insurance rates again, by 15 per cent for insurance premiums greater than $1,000 and by $25 to $150, for those that total $1,000 or less, leaving businesses with increasingly dire prospects.

“They just can’t afford to ride anymore,” Hertzog said. “My younger clients are just not getting into it because when your monthly rate is as much or more than your loan payments, it makes it very, very difficult.”

Earlier this week, an SGI spokesperson told the Leader-Post that increasing fees are part of a plan to rebalance insurance rates. This would lead to an annual rate decrease for some types of vehicles and in an increase for vehicles like motorcycles that are perceived to have higher accident risk. A latest proposed rate increase is being reviewed by The Saskatchewan Rate Review Panel.

Insurance rates for new models with large engines, like Harley cruisers, can range from $2,000 to $3,000 per year. While this is enough to dissuade individual motorists from buying, there is also a chain reaction that extends to other parts of the industry as well.

Hertzog explained the number of motorcyclists attending their community events and fundraisers is down by half, leading to a decrease in charity funding of a few thousand dollars, and his bike repair team is getting fewer clients now that people are riding less frequently.

Collin Cossette, owner of Action Cycle in Moose Jaw, switched from selling street models to off-road bikes, a decision motivated by a variety of factors unrelated to insurance, including losing a franchise. He said the demand for street models is not strong enough for him to want to go back.

The few street bikes he continues to carry, have remained untouched for years, brands that would have sold in the hundreds a decade ago. Most dealerships in his area, he said, have lost around 80 per cent of their sales now that more expensive models come with high insurance.

Rick Bradshaw, owner of Schrader’s Motors in Yorkton, estimated insurance rates have increased around 67 per cent in the past decade, causing their street bike sales to decrease from 50 per year to 20.

Most of the clients who visit Schrader’s are older adults who have more disposable income, while younger cohorts are dissuaded by the expense. Prior to the insurance hike, he said more young women were taking an interest in the sport than ever before, but he believes expense has since reduced this trend.

“You can be a high performance car enthusiast and buy a $100,000, loaded-up, 600 horsepower BMW car and you don’t pay any more for that car based on value … But for motorcyclists with the same zero clean record and no accidents, if that bike happens to have a bigger engine or more horsepower all of a sudden you’re penalized dramatically,” he said.

As for Hertzog, he thinks raising awareness of the issue is key to creating change.

“We’ve got to find a way to get people out riding and enjoy life, but it will be a bit of a cost on SGI,” he said. “But the cost of that is worth a lot because I think the industry and the sales and the amount of jobs that were lost are way more money than SGI will ever have lost.”

Indian Baggers New PowerPlus Performance Cams

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Indian Motorcycle takes its King of the Baggers to the next level with new PowerPlus Performance Cams.

Indian Challenger’s Best-in-Class Performance Gains 10% More Horsepower with Stage 2 Performance Cams Accessory Upgrade Kit.

MINNEAPOLIS (January 12, 2021) – In 2019 Indian Motorcycle reimagined what an American bagger could be with the introduction of the Indian Challenger. In 2020 the Challenger’s superior performance capabilities were dramatically validated with its victory at MotoAmerica’s inaugural King of the Baggers race at the historic Laguna Seca Raceway. Now the ultimate American bagger gets an extra dose of muscle with the introduction of Indian Motorcycle’s all-new Stage 2 PowerPlus Performance Cams – the same cams that helped power S&S’ Indian Challenger to victory at Laguna Seca.

Featuring best-in-class stock performance, the Indian Challenger gains 10% more horsepower with the Stage 2 upgrade kit – providing a new level of unmatched passing power and American bagger performance. Representing Indian Motorcycle’s most powerful engine ever, the stock 108 cubic-inch, liquid-cooled, V-twin PowerPlus engine delivers a class-leading 122 horsepower and 128 ft-lbs. of torque. By pairing the Stage 2 Performance Cams with Indian Motorcycle’s PowerPlus Stage 1 Air Intake and Stage 1 Slip-On Exhaust, riders will experience the unquestionable sensation of increased power the moment they twist the throttle.

“The Challenger has already established itself as the outright leader in performance for American baggers, but these PowerPlus Performance Cams raise that bar even higher,” said Reid Wilson, Vice President of Indian Motorcycle. “The world got its first taste of what these cams can do when our S&S Challenger dominated at King of the Baggers. But now everyone can experience it – whether you’re coming off the line at Laguna Seca or just giving it a little bit more to pass a semi out on the highway.”

Race proven, the S&S Challenger, piloted by renowned motorcycle racer Tyler O’Hara, was race tuned to take on the legendry Laguna Seca Raceway and a field dominated by heavily modified Harley-Davidsons. While the winning Challenger received structural modifications to ergonomics, suspension, overall weight and more, only minimal tweaks were made to the Challenger’s stock PowerPlus engine. Among those were the use of the unreleased Stage 2 Performance Cams.

Available now at Indian Motorcycle dealers for $699.99, riders can learn more at IndianMotorcycle.com or by following along on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

2020 Ducati Streetfighter V4 packs 208 hp in a 400-lb package

By General Posts

by Ronan Glon from https://www.autoblog.com/

It’s an evolution of the world’s best-selling superbike

Over a thousand attendees wildly cheered as Ducati boss Claudio Domenicali unveiled the 2020 Streetfighter V4, a racing-inspired motorcycle that weighs less than a Chevrolet big-block engine yet packs more power than a Subaru BRZ. It’s revving proof that jaw-dropping horsepower and eye-catching design are still the guiding lights in the motorcycle industry.

The Streetfighter V4 is a Panigale V4 (the world’s best-selling superbike) stripped down to the bare essentials. In car terms, it’s like if Audi dropped the powertrain from the R8 LMS into a purer, simpler variant of the car. While that sounds relatively simple, Domenicali explained striking the right balance between performance, usability, and design was much more difficult than anyone anticipated. The company’s engineers put the Streetfighter through its paces all over the world — even at Pikes Peak.

“We test prototypes once a month. About one year ago, we were in Sardinia and we were very unhappy [with this bike]. We were worried, but we totally changed the situation. It has taken one year of hard work, but in the last tests we’ve carried out, you can really feel the difference,” he explained.

Andrea Ferraresi, Ducati’s lead designer, instructed his team to draw inspiration from the Joker; yes, that Joker. The Streetfighter’s face was extremely important during the development process, because it’s a model without any side fairing. The drivetrain is fully exposed, hence why this type of motorcycle is called naked. The front end consequently has to convey the bike’s identity on its own, yet it still needs to house the headlights, plus a growing list of electronics.

Stylists bent the rules to add biplane wings near the front. Domenicali conceded it was a contentious decision, but the winglets ultimately stayed because they add nearly 62 pounds of downforce at 170 mph. An unexpected wheelie is the last thing you want if you’re traveling at that speed.

The Streetfighter V4 can get there, too, and it will make it look easy. Its specs are bewildering, especially if you’re used to seeing horsepower and torque curves in the automotive world. The 1,103cc V4 engine screams its heart out until it produces 208 horsepower at 12,500 rpm and 90 pound-feet of torque at 11,500 rpm. Riders who want more can order a racing-spec Akrapovič exhaust that bumps the four’s output to 220 horses, which is eight less than the 2019 Volkswagen GTI. And yet, the Streetfighter weighs 392 pounds in its lightest configuration.

While Ducati developed the Streetfighter V4 with performance and style in mind, it couldn’t build it without a generous serving of technology; Domenicali underlined the importance of safety. It consequently features a six-axis inertial measurement platform that monitors its pitch, roll, and yaw angles and does its best to step in if something looks amiss. The suite of electronic riding aids also includes a power launch function, traction control, and cornering ABS. These life-saving features are slowly but surely seeping into motorcycles from the car world, and riders are accepting them.

“For a while, ABS was very special for riders. We’d hear it all the time. Customers would say ‘oh, I have it in my fingers, I have it in my hands.’ No way. ABS is very important,” Domenicali stressed.

Ducati will offer the Streetfighter V4 in two variants when it releases the model in early 2020. The more hardcore V4 S version gains an upgraded Öhlins suspension and weight-saving forged rims provided by Marchesini. Pricing start at about 16,000 euros, a sum that converts to nearly $18,000, but full information about the American version will be released in early 2020.