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Mystery of the Effective Detective

By General Posts

UNWANTED — unemployed and homeless

Doggone life of the furry government servant

with inputs from Hot Air Cold Love at https://hotaircoldlove.substack.com/

Apparently, dogs are not detectives. This thought crime just got solved.

So, are all the decades of man’s best friend working alongside in forests and mountains, in rain and sunshine, in war-zones and disaster rescue efforts, the hound that will follow “his master’s voice” to hell– all just myth, legend and an old husband’s tale?

As per the research and the statistics, the dog’s days of working as a police dog are over. Maybe now — the customs officer will have to smell your luggage and bark orders if deemed unfit for boarding your flight. Maybe its the humans who are causing the loss of canine jobs (which is my gist of the new report mentioned below)??

Can you imagine all the working animals replaced with humans instead of machines? No more canary in a coal mine. No more snakes eating rats in paddy fields. No more ox ploughing farms, no more donkeys or mules carrying fool’s gold (also called simply as a fool), no more horse carriages nor armed cavalry, no legionnaire crossing deserts on a camel….

So what would you write? A western or a historical fiction or a scifi or a satire or just adopt a rescue dog to play with during writer’s block? Well, he could take you out for a walk and we know that’s always good for creativity (New Yorker story link).

Anyways, chew on this news for now!

Police Say Dogs Help Solve Crimes. Little Evidence Supports That.

In 2020, Salt Lake City abruptly terminated its canine unit for pursuing and apprehending suspects. Not much changed.

https://undark.org/2023/07/24/police-say-dogs-help-solve-crimes-little-evidence-supports-that/

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Wyoming Republicans Propose Ban on Electric Car Sales

By General Posts

from https://www.newsmax.com

A group of Republican state legislators in Wyoming have proposed a ban on electric vehicles in the state until 2035 in an attempt to protect the oil and gas industries.

A group of Republican state legislators in Wyoming have proposed a ban on electric vehicles in the state until 2035 in an attempt to protect the oil and gas industries.

The bill, which was introduced on Friday, states: “The proliferation of electric vehicles at the expense of gas-powered vehicles will have deleterious impacts on Wyoming’s communities and will be detrimental to Wyoming’s economy and the ability for the country to efficiently engage in commerce.”

Wyoming state Sen. Jim Anderson, a Republican and one of the bill’s sponsors, told The Cowboy State Daily that the legislation came after several states moved to ban the sale of gas combustion cars, and noted that if the measure passes, “The Legislature would be saying, ‘If you don’t like our petroleum cars, well, we don’t like your electric cars.’ ”

Co-sponsor Sen. Brian Boner said that the resolution would be a symbolic measure, but that it would still be meaningful.

“One might even say tongue-in-cheek, but obviously it’s a very serious issue that deserves some public discussion,” Boner said.

“I’m interested in making sure that the solutions that some folks want to the so-called climate crisis are actually practical in real life,” he added. “I just don’t appreciate when other states try to force technology that isn’t ready.”

 

Buell® Announces Upcoming Job Openings for Q1 of 2023

By General Posts

Buell® Announces Upcoming Job Openings for Q1 of 2023 based in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Buell Motorcycles, a Grand Rapids, Michigan-based manufacturer of high-performance motorcycles, is looking to add skilled and motivated individuals that have a passion for building exciting new products, contributing to a dynamic work environment, and becoming part of the Buell team.

“We are excited to take another big step forward in the continued growth of Buell. Today that big step forward is growing the Buell team here in West Michigan,” said Steve Laham, Chief Products, Development & Strategist Buell Motorcycle Co. “The Buell team’s expansion is in a multitude of areas of growth and will allow us to continue providing high performance motorcycles in the marketplace.”

Over the next three months, Buell will be hiring full and part-time employees across multiple areas within the company including:

  • Engineering
  • Manufacturing Operations
  • Digital Marketing Specalist
  • Production Staff
  • Painting Professionals

Prior skills and experience are a plus, but not a must with the right enthusiasm, self-motivation and a willingness to contribute to a dynamic work environment, and becoming part of the Buell team.

“We’ve built out an excellent senior leadership team with deep experience across the motorsports and transportation industries that all have a passion for two-wheeled products.” said Bill Melvin, CEO of Buell Motorcycle Co. “We are looking towards the future of the company and will continue to grow our team here in Grand Rapids to keep up with demand and develop some new exciting products.”

With formal job postings expected in Q1 of 2023, interested parties can submit their resume and position of interest to careers@buellmotorcycle.com.

Buell is back and delivering performance and excitement at every turn. For future Buell updates, follow our news page on our website and our social media pages.

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Polaris factory decisions controlled by Supply Chain Bottlenecks

By General Posts

By Bob Tita from https://www.wsj.com

Supply Chain Bottlenecks Drive Factory Decisions at This Maker of Boats, Motorcycles, ATVs.

Polaris is changing manufacturing processes on the fly to adapt to parts shortages; ATVs missing seats, snowmobiles without shocks.

Polaris is juggling 30 or so supply-chain constraints for its ATVs, motorcycles, snowmobiles, boats and utility terrain vehicles.

Like other manufacturers struggling with wobbly supply chains, sports-vehicle maker Polaris Inc. is deciding what to produce based on what parts it has on hand.

Polaris is changing its manufacturing and sales strategies on the fly to cope with shortages of materials and parts and an unreliable global transportation system that has disrupted precise production planning.

The company said it is juggling 30 or so supply-chain constraints for its all-terrain vehicles, motorcycles, snowmobiles, boats and off-road utility vehicles. Polaris changes its plans sometimes daily for what it produces. The company switches models for a while as supply-and-logistics managers scrounge for parts and materials for other models it is unable to build.

When there aren’t enough seats in the supply pipeline to produce four-seat versions of utility terrain vehicles because of a shortage of foam padding, for example, Polaris shifts production to two-seat or three-seat models. When more seats become available, factories circle back to four-seat models or add the missing seats to vehicles that have already been assembled.

“If you’re mixing and matching, eventually you’ll attain a good product mix,” said Kenneth Pucel, operations chief for the Medina, Minn.-based company.

Companies spent decades conditioning their supply chains to deliver just enough components and materials to match production schedules to hold down costs for storing parts. The absence of backup stocks of parts left manufacturers more exposed if a few large suppliers couldn’t deliver on time.

Tight markets typically provide opportunities for some companies to siphon customers away from competitors. But retail dealers say the supply-chain disruptions, transportation bottlenecks and labor shortages for manufacturers are now so pervasive that it is hard for anyone to capitalize. Polaris dealers sold out and the company couldn’t resupply them at their normal levels; instead, customers are now placing deposits on orders sent to factories.

Polaris shipped out some snowmobiles to dealers without shock absorbers and had dealers install them later when supplies recovered.

Chris Watts, owner of America’s Motor Sports dealership in Nashville, Tenn., said he carries Polaris and other brands. But his stocks of those brands are mostly depleted as well. “Customers are buying whatever they can get their hands on,” Mr. Watts said.

Like many manufacturers, Polaris had an unexpected surge in sales during the Covid-19 pandemic. When restaurants, movie theaters and fitness centers closed, consumers shifted their spending to boats, motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles and other outdoor vehicles. Polaris’s retail sales in North America last year grew by 25% from 2019 and increased by 70% in the first quarter from last year.

Polaris, which last year had sales of $7 billion, has a leading share in off-road vehicles with about 40% of the North American market, according to industry analysts.

Before the pandemic, Polaris could increase orders to its parts suppliers when needed. But this time, suppliers were less responsive. After a weekslong shutdown of factories last spring to slow the spread of the Covid-19 virus, stocks on hand were depleted. Making matters worse were clogged ocean ports, the freak winter storm that struck Texas in February and a ship blocking the Suez Canal that delayed vessels hauling shipping containers with Polaris’s parts and products from Asia.

Polaris said it devised workarounds to ease the company’s reliance on the hardest-to-get components, including semiconductor chips used in vehicle gauges. The company said its engineers redesigned the gauges on the fly to operate with different chip sets that are more readily available than the chips the company had been using.

When the supply of foam for seats tightened following the storm in Texas in February, Polaris built vehicles without seats for weeks and installed them later when resin for making plastic foam became available again.

About one-third of the vehicles coming off the company’s assembly lines are being held back until missing parts arrive, the company said. That is about twice the volume of new vehicles that typically need to be reworked.

The availability of shock absorbers has been particularly erratic. When shocks for snowmobiles ran out during the fall production season, Polaris shipped some snowmobiles to dealers without them and sent the shocks later for the dealers to install.

“It wasn’t efficient from a cost standpoint, but it bought us time,” Chief Executive Michael Speetzen said.

Shock absorbers for single-seat all-terrain vehicles became so scarce late last year that production managers at the Roseau, Minn., plant switched to a two-seat variant of the four-wheel motorcycles instead that used different but available suspension components. The production lines at the factory that welded metal frames and produced plastic moldings for ATVs were reset overnight to allow production of the two-seat models to begin the following morning.

“You pivot away from parts shortages. Our team is good at building what we can,” said Mr. Pucel.

Mr. Pucel said at least 10% of the company’s suppliers have been under stress since the pandemic, often struggling to obtain enough materials from their own suppliers or to come up with the money needed to purchase additional equipment to increase production. He said the number of suppliers struggling would be greater if Polaris hadn’t culled underperforming companies from its supplier base a couple of years before the pandemic.

Polaris has intervened to purchase equipment and materials for some suppliers in exchange for reduced prices. When production of plastic resin in Texas stopped because of the February storm, Polaris allocated some of its own resin to its suppliers.

In anticipation of extended higher demand, Polaris is expanding its Monterrey, Mexico, plant where some of its most popular utility terrain vehicle are assembled. The company is increasing boat production at its Elkhart, Ind., plant and reopening another in Syracuse, Ind. It has hired about 1,000 more employees in the past year, a 7% increase in the workforce.

Maintenance on equipment and rush jobs to realign assembly lines to produce different models often happen overnight or on weekends. Disruptions in production and the social-distancing procedures in plants because of Covid-19 have been rough on employees.

“The whole organization has been on high alert,” CEO Speetzen said. “It’s one of the things I worry about.”

Tariff truce may spare iconic US products from huge price hikes

By General Posts

by Jenny Leonard from https://financialpost.com

U.S. and EU Set to Reach Temporary Tariff Truce Over Metals

Iconic American products affected by EU countertariffs include Harley-Davidson Inc. motorcycles, Levi Strauss & Co. jeans and bourbon whiskey. Business associations and lawmakers have asked that the U.S. lift the duties, saying they do more harm than good.

The Biden administration is set to announce it’s reached a truce in a dispute with the European Union over metal tariffs, sparing iconic products such as U.S. bourbon whiskey from a doubling of EU duties next month, people familiar with the matter said.

A resolution could be announced as soon as Monday, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the talks are private.

At issue is a high-profile dispute that started in 2018 under former President Donald Trump, in which the U.S. imposed duties on steel and aluminum from Europe, Asia and elsewhere over risks to American national security. The EU has since retaliated and on June 1 was set to double tariffs on a list of American products to 50%.

Under the agreement with the Biden administration, the EU will refrain from increasing those tariffs and both sides will engage in a dialog on steel overcapacity, according to the people.

The European Union had previously proposed to suspend all duties on each other’s products for six months while negotiations on a long-term solution continue.

“We can only reiterate that the EU remains committed to finding a solution with the U.S. to the unduly justified tariffs on steel and aluminium and to working with the U.S. in tackling the root cause of the problem, which is the global steel overcapacity,” a spokesperson for the European Commission said on Saturday.

Negotiators on both sides of the Atlantic are working to eventually remove the tariffs but are not yet ready to do so, the people said.

Spokespeople for the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative and Commerce Department didn’t respond to requests for comment.

President Joe Biden will participate in a U.S.-EU summit in Brussels next month during his first foreign trip as the nation’s leader. Biden and his European counterparts are set to discuss trade cooperation, the White House said.

Trump imposed the 25% steel tariff, along with a 10% duty on aluminum imports, in March 2018, using an arcane national-security provision in a 1962 trade law to justify the move. Some countries, including Brazil and South Korea, negotiated deals to avoid the tariff, and Trump dropped the duty for imports from Canada and Mexico. But the tariffs still apply for much of world.

The tariffs in place “have already exacted a heavy toll from U.S. businesses and the workers they employ,” John Murphy, the senior vice president for international policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, said in a statement Friday. He noted an almost 40% drop in U.S. spirits exports to the EU since the duties came into place.

In a Senate Finance Committee hearing Wednesday, U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai defended Trump’s metals tariffs. They “have really roiled our economy, but were necessary to address a global overcapacity problem driven largely but not solely by China,” she said.

The U.S. has achieved its goal of blocking subsidized Chinese steel from the American market through other tools such as anti-dumping and countervailing duties, Murphy said. Separate tariffs imposed via section 301 of the Trade Act, under which Beijing’s practices were deemed unfair, have also deterred shipments, he said.

Chinese steel imports now account for less than 1% of U.S. steel consumption, Murphy said.