Skip to main content
Tag

DIY

Battery Maintenance 101

By General Posts

This is a 6-Volt Battery Tender for Vintage batteries.

And How to Use Tenders
By Bandit, Jason Mook, Battery Tender Crew, and Jeff Holt

How to use battery tenders? We are on the hunt.

A friend kept his bike on a tender 24/7. But when he rode to his girl’s house and spent the night, the bike was dead in the morning.

Jason Mook, the owner of Deadwood Custom Cycles recommends putting your bike on a charger or tender once a week, charge it and then unplug it.

CLICK HERE To Read this Tech Article only on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Five Tips for a Time-Sensitive DIY Job

By General Posts

Learn to tackle your next time-sensitive project with confidence
by Kyle Smith from Hagerty.com

The garage is a strange place.

Some projects you tackle with all the time in the world, and others are on a deadline tighter than ten-year-old denim. Anyone that has rushed to wrap up a project understands the stress and frustration that accompanies a time crunch.

Click Here to Read this Tech Tips on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

DIY: Building your own Electric Motorcycle

By General Posts

from https://www.financialexpress.com

How to build your own 150 km/h electric motorcycle: DIY instructions for $ 10

There’s also a list of tools and parts you’ll need, including a 72V motor and a GSX-R750 front end. Plus a 32-minute YouTube video for a bit of handholding while you go through the process.

DIY videos work really well on social media, don’t they? Especially since a lot of people have been home for over a year now due to the still ongoing pandemic. So, how about building an electric motorcycle? Right, bring out your welding tools and get to work. Too far? We thought so. But this video and CAD files could be a great help if you are working on an engineering project in college or even setting up an EV startup, that seems to be quite hip in the automotive industry these days.

There have been several books on ‘how to build a motorcycle’ which are not just guides to actually building a bike but also a good read if you’re nerdy about these things. And until recently, you could buy plans for building everything from the frame to engine design.

Now though, technology has raced ahead with computer-aided design. And the good folk at Renewable Systems Technology are offering plans or rather CAD files for $10 for building an electric motorcycle that can do 150 km/h. The website adds that the build should cost around $5,000.

There’s also the 32-minute YouTube video above detailing the process and of course, there’s a long list of parts and tools you’ll need. The build in the video uses a 72V motor and a GSX-R750 front end.

We don’t have any mechanical engineers on our team so we can’t vouch for if the instructions will hand you a multi-million dollar idea or a recipe for disaster but surely there’s a lot to learn.

From the Website: https://renewablesystemstechnology.com/electric-motorcycle.html

This bike is equivalent to a 100-150cc gas powered bike with a top speed of 75 mph (120 km/h) @ 72V and a range of 60 miles (100 km).

The plans are now available for download. As mentioned previously, there is no step by step build guide for this build, just a .pdf with dimensional drawings and the 3D Sketchup CAD. It’s not really a project for beginners, and I don’t think experienced builders need me to explain step by step how to work the materials, so I kept it simple this time. But I did set up scenes in the CAD with dimensions for all of the components, so it would be worth while to get Sketchup (or use the free web version) and refer to the CAD for a better look at the details and dimensions vs the .pdf drawings.

 

How to Handle the Four Most Common Road Emergencies

By General Posts

You are out on the Highway, enjoying your getaway when suddenly your motorcycle stalls. What to do? Fortunately, the four most common road emergencies can usually be prevented by regular inspection and maintenance, but here’s what to do when that doesn’t work. FROM www.ridermagazine.com

1. Out of Gas
Run out of gas on the road and you’ll need a donor bike and a transfer device. To siphon, the fuel level in the donor bike must be higher than the level it will reach in the recipient bike; place the donor bike on a curb or rise. Carry a siphon hose, at least three feet of flexible, transparent hose that is easy to coil and stow under a seat or in a fairing pocket. Get one with a squeeze bulb and you won’t need to undergo the potentially disgusting ritual of siphoning raw gas with your mouth.

To avoid mouth siphoning immerse the hose deep into the donor bike’s fuel supply, cap the other end with your thumb and begin to slowly draw out the hose and lower it into the recipient bike’s fuel tank. Remove your thumb once the level of fuel in the hose drops below the top level of the fuel in the donor bike (that’s why a transparent hose is best), and the fuel will begin to flow.

If this is not possible, drain fuel into whatever is handy, such as a beverage container, sidecover or tool tray by removing a fuel line and turning on the petcock. This may not be possible if the donor bike has a vacuum-flow system. Rinse the container thoroughly with gasoline, and be certain ol’ Jimbo ain’t lightin’ up during this procedure.

Tools: Siphon hose

Prevention: Check the gauge, dummy! Zero your bike’s trip odometer when you fill up, and it will show the elapsed mileage.

2. Flat Tire:
Establish whether your bike has tube or tubeless tires. For the past few decades, most bikes with cast wheels have carried tubeless tires, while most with wire spoke wheels have had tube-type. If it’s a tube-type, you’ll have to “break the bead,” pull the tire away from the wheel (pack tire irons) far enough to expose the puncture in the tube. This may mean removing the wheel from the bike. Roughen the area around the puncture with the tool supplied in the patch kit and apply cement. Wait momentarily till the glue becomes tacky, and apply the patch.

For a tubeless tire, it’s only necessary to remove the nail and insert the tool from the patch kit to enlarge and roughen the hole. Cover a plug with cement and insert. Cut off excess and add air. The three methods of doing so are with CO2 cartridges, an electrical pump that runs off the battery and a hand pump.

Tools: Toolkit, tire patch kit, tire irons, air supply

Prevention: Inspect tire tread frequently for depth and foreign objects, and check pressure regularly. The last 10 percent of tire life results in 90 percent of the problems.

3. Low Oil:
Suddenly the oil light comes on. You’re a quart low—oops! Rodney has a quart along, but your bike runs that expensive 20W-50 synthetic bike oil and his is 40W cheapo car oil. Can you mix them?

The answer is yes. Considering that the alternative is either serious engine damage or sending someone on a 100-mile goose chase, mixing will not harm the engine, though it will dilute the properties of the high-quality oil. Change oil and filter at your earliest convenience.

Tools: Rag, funnel, extra quart

Prevention: Check oil

4. Sudden Engine Stop, Reason Unknown
A sudden engine cutout usually boils down to fuel or electricity. Check fuel supply, check for a clogged gas cap vent (does opening the cap suddenly and temporarily “solve” the problem?) or fuel filter. If your bike is carbureted and there’s fuel in the float bowl(s), the problem likely resides elsewhere.

Turn on the ignition and see if your bike has lights, horn and starter. If not, check that battery cables are tightly connected and clean. If your battery isn’t maintenance-free, are the cells properly topped up with distilled water? Spray WD-40 on the sparkplugs, wires and coils to displace any water.

If the lights and horn are strong, check fuses (know your bike’s fuse box location, and carry spares). With a clip lead and light, clip the lead to ground (a piece of bare metal on the engine) and place the point on either side of the fuse with the ignition on. If there’s power on both sides, the fuse is good.

If the starter cranks but the engine does not start, use the clip lead to establish if there is juice at the coils. If so, pull the spark plugs and establish if they’re sparking. If not, trace the wires back to the last place where there was electricity, then inspect upstream for bare wires or breaks. Listen and watch for obvious stray sparks. Wrap broken wire with tape to get you home.

Tools: Clip lead, electrical tape, fuses, WD-40

Prevention: Pray

And, of course, whenever you go for a ride, carry a cell phone, credit cards and some spare cash–sometimes calling in the cavalry is your only option. It’s also a good idea to have coverage with a roadside assistance plan, such as the one that’s included with annual membership at the American Motorcyclist Association.

Back To Basics – How To Change A Rear Tire

By General Posts

Andie’s Garage: The How To’s for Basic Maintenance On Your Motorcycle

I want to share with you the basics of repairs so you can decide if you want to tackle it yourself, or just simply know what happens when you take it to someone else to get repaired.

I like to smoke tires, not drugs! The down side to this addictive behavior? Always replacing rear tires!

Not only do I complete a burnout before each and every pass I make on the drag strip, I like to do them for fun!

CLICK HERE TO READ A HOW-TO GUIDE TO CHANGING YOUR REAR TIRE

Join the Bikernet.com Cantina today for more exclusive Tech and News.