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Annual Motorcycle Ride for Toys for Tots to Begin October 24

By General Posts

by Allison Keys from https://www.krqe.com

On Sunday, Oct. 24, the 17th Annual Ride for Toys for Tots will kick off the season.

Toys for Tots begins collections for holiday season during motorcycle run.

As a child, there is nothing quite as exciting as waking up on Christmas morning with presents under the tree. However, not every child gets to experience that feeling.

The Toys for Tots campaign works to change that. Assistant Program Coordinator Paul Caputo and Maj. Mike Schroeder discuss the campaign and how it’s making a difference in the lives of local children.

A program by the US Marine Corps Reserve, Toys for Tots strives to collect new, unwrapped toys during October, November, and December every year and to distribute them as Christmas gifts to children in need within the community.

On Sunday, Oct. 24, the 17th Annual Ride for Toys for Tots will kick off the season at the Super Walmart located on 528 and Enchanted Hills. Registration for the motorcycle ride starts at 9 a.m. with a ride to Thunderbird Harley-Davidson at 5000 Alameda Blvd. for an afterparty. The entry fee to the event is an unwrapped gift.

For more information on how to get involved with the program, visit https://toysfortots.org/.

If you’d like to put a donation box for toys at your business, call Paul Caputo at 505-975-2033.

WATCH: Full interview with Toys for Tots Asst. Program Coordinator Paul Caputo and Maj. Mike Schroeder

Turning a Cuddly Honda Super Cub into a Beast

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Cuddly Honda Super Cub Turns Into Beast, Looks Meaner Than Some Harley-Davidsons

Like it or not, even the many fans of the Honda Super Cub have to admit this particular two-wheeler is not exactly custom material. The underbone machine is a huge customer favorite, but most of the time we don’t get to see the results of investments made in customization processes.

The Super Cub is one of the longest-running nameplates in the Japanese bike maker’s portfolio. It was introduced all the way back in the late 1950s, and since that time, it sold over 100 million units, becoming in effect the world’s most-produced motor vehicle (and that includes cars).

Given the huge number of them on the market, it was only natural for some owners to customize their rides even if, as said, we don’t get to see such projects all that often. Yet this week, thanks to a garage called K-Speed, we’re treated to exactly that, a too-good of a Super Cub not to discuss.

The Japanese say this is their first custom Super Cub C125, but even so, they seem to have nailed a look that might even put some Harleys to shame. The conversion rides closer to the ground than its stock siblings, the front end has been completely restyled, and much larger wheels than we’re used to were fitted front and back.

The rear end has been chopped as well, making the motorcycle look more like a vintage bike than an overgrown scooter. The black paint spread head to toe enhances that impression even more.

Click Here to See Details of this custom Honda Super Cub by K-Speed.

K-Speed says no changes were made to the thing’s engine and brakes, but even so, the price is about three times higher than that of a stock machine. Whereas, for instance, you could buy the 2021 Super Cub C125 for just under $4,000, this one has a retail price of over $13,000.

Visit K-Speed Website at: https://k-speed.com/

Buell Motorcycle introducing new Buellvana® online reservation system

By General Posts

Buell is back and introducing Buellvana®, the new online reservation system making it easy to reserve, buy, and ride a new Buell.

Buellvana® Reservation System Goes Live Nov. 1, 2021

Grand Rapids, Mich. – Buell is Back…and on Monday, November 1, 2021, is introducing the new Buellvana® online reservation system allowing customers to reserve a production slot for their new Buell motorcycle.

In today’s digital world, customers expect simplicity when placing an order along with easy delivery. Buellvana® achieves both in an innovative way for customers and dealers. In 3 simple steps, customers can 1 – Reserve a production slot for $25, 2- Confirm their configuration, and 3 – Make final payment and arrange local delivery.

“We have tested the Buellvana model over the last 3 years and it works flawlessly,” said Bill Melvin, CEO of Buell Motorcycle Co. “Customers want an easy transaction and product delivered right to their community. Dealers want satisfied customers, a manufacturer that helps them solve issues, with an opportunity to maintain their profit margin. Buellvana achieves that and will be a model of the future for manufacturers.”

What is Buellvana®? Well, if nirvana is owning and riding a Buell, then Buellvana® is the ease of purchasing a Buell Motorcycle. The new Carbon Fiber Hammerhead 1190 will start at $18,995 retail, the Carbon Fiber 1190 SX will start at $17,995 retail, and increase with additional options, including an option for an extended warranty.

Here is how it works in three easy steps:

1. Go to www.BuellMotorcycle.com and place a $25 dollar reservation for a production slot, plus receive a limited-edition Buell hat.

2. When your production slot nears, the Buell sales team will call to discuss and confirm the exact model configuration. In addition, your local delivery location and local service dealer will be identified.

3. Ready for delivery. The Buell sales team will call to finalize payment and arrange delivery of your new Buell Motorcycle.

It’s that easy, it’s Buellvana®.

Production will begin in November, so reserving a production slot early will ensure customers get to the front of line. Want to wait until Spring for delivery…customers can do that too!

“Buell fully understands the customer’s need for a local servicing dealer and its importance to customer retention success. We also respect and are committed to building a strong service network to support our customers. Buellvana achieves that,” said Steve Laham, Chief Products, Development & Strategy officer. “With the rapidly changing nature of consumer online behavior, and demand for more choice, Buellvana is a more effective use of resources while satisfying the service dealer and our customers’ desires.”

Buell is back and introducing Buellvana®, the new online reservation system making it easy to reserve, buy, and ride a new Buell.

For future Buell updates, follow our news page on our website and our social media pages.

Website: www.BuellMotorcycle.com

Zakar Event Center Named Site of Vance & Hines Off-Road Proving Grounds

By General Posts

Zakar’s professionally built terrain park allows for product testing and demos

California City, CA – October 21, 2021 – The Zakar Event Center and Terrain Park, a subsidiary of RawHyde Adventures, has been named the site of the Vance & Hines Off-Road Proving Grounds (ORPG). As the aftermarket exhaust manufacturer continues to invest in the growing off-road and adventure motorcycle spaces, the ORPG will serve as the company’s private site for product development and testing.

Situated on 100 acres in the heart of the Mojave Desert, Zakar is an ideal location for the new ORPG, offering the Vance & Hines team immediate access to Zakar’s professionally-built terrain park as well as the area’s hundreds of miles of off-road trails.

“We are focused on bringing Vance & Hines exhilaration to all types of off-road riders. Our new proving grounds is an example of our commitment to create a steady flow of great products for off-road fans,” explained Vance & Hines President, Mike Kennedy.

The announcement came on the heels of the introduction of new Vance & Hines exhaust products designed for the adventure motorcycle segment.

“It is refreshing to see a company with the history and pedigree of Vance & Hines invest in the Adventure community,” remarked Jim Hyde, founder of RawHyde Adventures and Zakar Event Center. “ADV riders are all about performance, and to know that the new exhaust for the BMW R 1250 GS is just one of many products to come shows that Vance & Hines is committed to helping grow our space.”

To learn more about RawHyde’s new Zakar Event Center, visit www.zakar-events.com. For additional questions or to get a quote for your event, call (702) 209-8503.

About Zakar Event Center
Zakar, a RawHyde Adventures company, is an Overland Terrain Park and Event Center situated on 100 acres in the Mojave Desert, just two hours north of Los Angeles. In all of North America there is no place like Zakar, an off-road focused motorsports venue offering a full range of hospitality services as well as a professionally built terrain park for training, testing or product demonstrations.

For more information visit www.Zakar-Events.com.

The Nuts Bikernet Weekly News for October 21, 2021

By General Posts

Bedroll from 5-Ball Racing Gear

Bandit says, “Let’s ride, no matter what.”

Don’t ever give up on Freedom. It works.

— Bandit

The Bikernet Weekly News is sponsored in part by companies who also dig Freedom including: Cycle Source Magazine, the MRF, Las Vegas Bikefest, Iron Trader News, ChopperTown, BorntoRide.com and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum.

Click Here to Read the Weekly News only on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

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First Ride Review of 2022 BMW R 18 B

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

A Tour(ing) De Force – Conquering California’s coast with a Bavarian bagger.

BMW made no bones about moving in on the Harley-dominated cruiser market when it launched the R 18 in April, 2020. Drawing from the Motor Company’s Softail Slim, the Bavarians literally took a page out of Harley’s book to attract buyers. BMW then returned to the well in October, 2020, introducing the R 18 Classic. Equipped with leather bags and a large windshield, the variant shared more than a moniker with Harley’s Heritage Classic.

That first offensive wasn’t BMW’s endgame, however. To truly hit the Harley where it hurts, the company went after the Bar and Shield’s bread and butter: the grand touring segment. Released in July, 2021, the R 18 B added long-distance comfort and convenience to the platform’s repertoire. BMW did more than just slap on a full-size fairing and hard bags though. The House of Munich re-engineered the chassis to suit the cruiser’s new touring ambitions as well.

A 19-inch front wheel steps in for the R18’s 16-incher, the rake tightens to 27.3 degrees, and the wheelbase shrinks to 66.7 inches. That revised double-loop frame not only accommodates two-up touring but also lightened the standard model’s heavy steering. BMW addressed another common R 18 complaint when it increased the bagger’s rear suspension travel to 4.7 inches while adding position-dependent damping and hydraulically adjustable ride height.

The advanced technology doesn’t stop at the tail end though. The new front fairing houses the IMAX of all motorcycle displays, a 10.25-inch-wide, HD resolution (1920 x 720) TFT dash. On the left switchgear, BMW’s trademark WonderWheel makes its R 18 debut, allowing riders to scroll through the bike’s diagnostics, settings, and available navigation. The Marshall stereo system encourages users to jam out to local radio stations or Bluetooth-connected media while the optional radar-assisted adaptive cruise control outfits the R 18 B for the long haul.

Improved geometry and cutting-edge tech may lead BMW’s latest charge, but the Beemer still has to stand up to the class benchmark: the Harley-Davidson Street Glide. With that gold standard in mind, we set out for a 1,100-mile trip up the California coast to test whether the new BMW R 18 B is a checkmate in a brewing battle of the baggers.

On Tour
Despite all the changes that went into the R 18 B, the big-bore boxer remains unchanged. The air/liquid-cooled, 1,802cc opposed twin still produces 116 ft-lb of torque (at 3,000 rpm) and 91 horsepower (at 4,750 rpm). For that reason, the Beemer shines between 3,000 rpm and 4,000 rpm. Within that range, the bagger pulls like a freight train, but as the torque curve dives, the R 18 B’s direct throttle response trails off as well. Beyond the 4,000-rpm mark, the burly boxer still chugs up to its 5,500-rpm redline, but without all the gusto found in the mid-range.

Though the R 18 B idles at around 1,000 rpm, riders have to coax the 1.8-liter engine up to 2,000 rpm, or else it stutters and bogs away from the line. Lean fueling (due to modern emissions standards) may be the root of the issue, but riders can manage takeoffs with a conservative clutch hand and a liberal right wrist.

The narrow powerband may be a limiting factor, but the mid-range also dampens the boxer’s raucous vibrations. In the lower gears, the vibes are most prominent, buzzing through the bars and mini-floorboards. At highway speeds, however, the sensation is much more tolerable.

At 70 mph in sixth gear, the R 18 B lumbers along at a steady pace, though throttle pick up slightly lags. As a result, I regularly cruised at highway speeds in fifth gear to stay within the 3,000-4,000-rpm sweet spot, which yields the best passing power for emergency situations. While the power pulses and delivery presented challenges, the optional adaptive cruise control (ACC) smoothed out all the rough edges.

The Bosch-developed system operates similar to standard cruise control, but with a following distance button at the right switchgear, the rider remains in control of the semi-automated functions. Even in the closest setting, the three-second buffer between the BMW and the vehicle ahead leaves enough time for the evasive maneuvers. If that following distance is too close for comfort, two additional settings enable users to extend that cushion to a more cautious gap.

On the open road, ACC proved invaluable. Those familiar with motorcycle cruise control systems know that the technology not only covers ground in the most efficient manner but also provides much-needed rest for the rider’s right wrist. With ACC, on the other hand, the user is even freer to set it and forget it. Gliding down the road at 75 mph, I regularly let the system take me along for the ride while I added intermittent steering inputs. Even when a car cut into my lane, the R 18 B throttled down to a comfortable 65 mph in a matter of seconds to maintain my buffer zone.

In those situations, ACC kicked in immediately but not abruptly. I never felt like I (or the system) was out of control. Of course, pulling in the clutch or brake lever disengages the cruise control, but users can also override the system with extra throttle if they need to escape a hairy situation. The ACC is also quite intuitive, slowing to the set speed after a throttle burst or ramping up once the vehicle ahead switches lanes.

The system not only accurately distinguishes between cars in neighboring lanes, but if the fairing-integrated radar detects a vehicle ahead picking up speed, it proportionately adds throttle as well. In its category, BMW’s R 18 B is the first to adopt the Bosch-developed ACC and that gives the Bavarian bagger a definite edge in technology. However, there’s more to touring than gizmos and gadgets, and the R 18 B brings its own bag of tricks to the party.

Every Twist And Turn
While the standard R 18 favored a stance and style perfect for bar-hopping, BMW had to outfit the touring variant for cross-country travels. To make the handling more responsive, the firm steepened the bagger’s rake by more than five degrees. The 19-inch wheel may seem counterintuitive to those goals, but the R 18 B changes direction with the slightest input at the handlebars.

Shod in Bridgestone Battlecruise H50 tires, the larger front wheel and 49mm fork did a commendable job of communicating the differing road surfaces. From super slab interstates to gravel-strewn backroads to tar-snaked twisties, I always understood the bagger’s available grip. At lean, the front end was just as accurate, providing predictable feedback and response. However, it’s hard to shower the rear suspension with similar praise.

The R 18 B’s updated monoshock certainly improves on the standard model’s harsh rear end. With just 3.5 inches of travel, the original shock sent each bump and pothole straight through the rider’s back. To atone for that oversight, BMW jacked up the bagger’s back end to 4.7 inches of travel, delivering an ultra-plush ride. The Beemer practically negates all road irregularities as a result, smoothing out even the hardest hits. Unfortunately, the soft rear end and direct front fork don’t always get along.

At tip-in, the R 18 B is planted and predictable. Conversely, if the rider deviates from the original line or encounters mid-corner bumps, the rear wallows with a slight undulating action. As a result, the feel out back becomes vague and disconnected. If you select and stick to a line throughout the curve, the bike plows right through without so much as a wobble. Unfortunately, unforeseen adjustments quickly expose the buoyant back end. Of course, we don’t expect a bagger to hustle around corners, but a manually adjustable monoshock could go a long way to addressing the issue.

It’s a similar story with the brakes. The dual four-piston calipers and twin 300mm front discs provide enough stopping power in the end, but they don’t provide much in the way of initial bite or feel. For those that favor the front brake, BMW’s system distributes a portion of braking power to the single four-piston caliper and 300mm rotor out back as well. The linked brakes help shed speed more efficiently, but you can also feel the system borrowing braking power at the lever. That’s a disconcerting sensation when you’re descending a steep hill. Luckily, the rider aid only intrudes in select situations and heavy braking zones.

Comfy Confines
Even if the R 18 B’s bag of tricks is a mixed bag, the infotainment system draws from BMW’s industry-leading interface. Unlike the R 18’s stripped-down controls and throwback circular speedometer, BMW throws the kitchen sink at the bagger’s new fairing. Four analog gauges report remaining fuel, speed, rpm, and voltage while the 10.25-inch TFT boasts enough room for a dual-pane layout. Using’s BMW’s intuitive Wonder Wheel and menu button, the user can access trip data, local radio stations, smartphone media, navigation, and bike settings.

While the system puts endless options at the rider’s fingertips, navigating those options with the Wonder Wheel and menu button can become cumbersome. Accessing certain submenus requires punching the menu button while others involve a lateral press on the Wonder Wheel. With practice, your left thumb develops the muscle memory necessary for jumping through the folders quickly, but a simplified interface would also speed up the process. Additionally, the turn Wonder Wheel is located next to the turn signal switch, and I embarrassingly pushed the wrong control during many a left-lane change.

As for the infotainment system’s performance, the Marshall speakers deliver crisp, clear audio. With two fairing-mounted speakers and optional subwoofers in each bag, the sound literally envelopes the rider. During testing, the system worked seamlessly with Apple iOS devices but frequently encountered connectivity issues with Android smartphones. Upon connecting, the interface offered full operation of the phone’s media, but functionality would suffer after a second startup. Disconnecting and reconnecting the device restored full control to the rider, but I eventually switched to the radio to avoid the hassle.

The rest of the R 18 B’s cockpit prioritized comfort and convenience as well. With wide buckhorn bars sweeping back to the rider, the upright position suits long-distance road trips. The broad fork-mounted fairing mitigated buffeting but the short windshield left turbulent air dancing on the top of my helmet. A taller windscreen from BMW’s catalog will easily remedy that situation for taller riders, but anyone under five foot, eight inches will be just fine with the stock shield.

Further back, BMW raised the seat 1.1 inches over the standard model’s saddle to relax the bend at the rider’s knees and the adjustment worked. Due to the massive outboard cylinders, the bagger’s legroom hasn’t increased over the R 18, but the taller seat does help relieve stiff knees during long journeys. On the other hand, extra padding on the touring seat would have gone a long way as well, but my bony back end typically endured the 225 miles between fill-ups.

The features that I can’t praise enough are the heated seat and hand grips. During my travels, I hit spots of rain and heavy winds. The chill temperatures eventually receded by the afternoon, but the five-level heated accessories allowed me to maintain my mileage quota in relative comfort. The premium features made the long stints in the saddle more enjoyable than ever, but they all come at a price.

Bringing It Home
Starting at $21,495, the 2022 BMW R 18 B slightly undercuts the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide’s MSRP ($21,999). However, BMW’s Premium Light Package (hill start assist, adaptive headlight, reverse assist, and Marshall subwoofers) tacks on $2,300. The Select Package (alarm system, locking fuel cap, heated seat, tire pressure monitor, and electric bag locks) adds another $1,275 to the price tag. Throw in Roland Sand Designs milled cylinder covers, an engine housing cover, a two-tone black wheelset, and Vance & Hines slip-ons, and the asking price swiftly approaches $30,000.

Many riders will opt for the base package, but a fair share will also order the works, and for good reason. Features such as the tire pressure monitor system, heated seat, and Marshall Gold Series Audio amplify the R 18 B’s touring chops. However, it’s a solid package in stock trim. No, the new Beemer isn’t a death blow to Harley-Davidson, but it’s a worthy competitor. At 877 pounds, it has 22 pounds on its main rival, but it’s also the only bike in the category to offer adaptive cruise control and a 10.25-inch TFT display. The R 18 B may not be BMW’s endgame either, but it definitely changes the game for bagger customers.

Kawasaki Unveils Gas-Electric Hybrid Prototype Motorcycle

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Kawasaki Lifts Cover On Its Gas-Electric Hybrid Prototype Bike

A peek behind the curtain/fairings.

We’ve been following Kawasaki’s hybrid motorcycle development since the firm filed patents in July, 2019. By November, 2021, Team Green gave us a peek at its progress with a short video laying out the philosophy behind the project. Then, an April, 2021, patent revealed Kawi’s new 48V hybrid battery design. Now, Kawasaki has pulled back the curtain (and the fairings) on its latest hybrid build while committing to a 2025 gas-electric hybrid production models.

Due to the chassis, front headlight configuration, and exhaust system, the prototype looks like it’s based on the Ninja 400. Kawasaki hasn’t officially confirmed our suspicions, but leveraging the entry-level sportbike aligns with current hybrid technology limitations. In automobiles, it’s easier for manufacturers to pair electric and internal combustion powertrains. In motorcycles, however, space is a much more limited resource. As a result, the firm couples its existing small-capacity parallel twin with a compact electric power unit.

From the beginning, Kawasaki has developed its hybrid project with the idea that riders would utilize the powertrains in different environments. The internal combustion engine suits highway riding, while the electric motor works best in urban environments. On a twisty road, both would work in concert to deliver the best of both worlds. It seems like the small-bore Ninja-based prototype would satisfy those requirements while also providing enough room to accommodate the new apparatus.

Of course, with two powertrains, the transmission will have to play nice with both systems, and Kawi’s automated gearshift smooths that transition. The new feature consists of an automated clutch, servo-powered shifter, and push-buttons for the user to operate. With so many European cities introducing zero emissions zones lately (and only more to come), the hybrid technology may be the perfect happy-medium between holding on to the range and convenience of gas-powered motorcycles while adopting cleaner and more efficient running powertrains.

For some, 2025 may be a long time to wait, but it’s encouraging to see Kawasaki’s project progress at such a rapid rate. Hopefully, we can say the same for the gas-electric hybrid’s acceleration when it hits the market in a few years.

Kawasaki Ninja 400 Based Hybrid Electric Motorcycle Prototype Unveiled

by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Kawasaki is working on a wide range of fully electric and hybrid motorcycles for the next few years

Kawasaki has made some major announcements recently which reveals the intentions of the Japanese superbike manufacturer for the future. The bikemaker has revealed that by 2035, all its models would run on electrified powertrains- either fully electric or hybrid electric vehicles, in major international markets.

In regard to this idea, the company is planning to launch ten new fully electric and hybrid motorcycles by 2025. The first of them was recently showcased at a presentation meeting in Japan. The prototype revealed is slated to be the first hybrid electric motorcycle from Kawasaki.

However, this isn’t the first motorcycle with an electric powertrain to be unveiled by the Japanese brand. Earlier in 2019, Kawasaki had revealed the electric Ninja 300 Concept, called EV Endeavor. Later the same year, the company filed patents for a hybrid motorcycle, images of which floated on the internet. The recent prototype unveiled is expected to be based on the same patents.

Kawasaki Ninja 400 Hybrid Prototype – Details
Going by the images, Kawasaki appears to have used Ninja 400 as the base for the exposed prototype of the hybrid bike. It features a parallel-twin engine which is bolted onto a new tubular steel frame with a large electric motor mounted above the transmission. The electric motor derives its energy from a small 48V battery pack located under the seat.

As per Kawasaki, the hybrid powertrain is equipped with a regenerative feature that tops up the battery when low on charge. Another interesting aspect of this hybrid motorcycle is that within city limits, the bike would completely run on battery and electric motor, cutting out power from the combustion engine. This mode will be useful when some cities introduce zero emissions zones in the future.

Automated Transmission
The bikemaker has equipped the prototype with GPS technology that automatically switches to electric power as soon as the bike enters city limits. Outside the city limits, the motorcycle will draw energy from both the combustion engine and electric motor in order to boost its performance. The entire system is paired with an automated transmission system with buttons for gear shifts.

The setup comprises an automated clutch and a servo-operated shifter that enables gear shifts through push button changes. Other details revealed from the images include a pair of telescopic front forks and rear mono-shock supporting the tubular steel frame. Stopping power is provided by single disc brakes on both wheels while being linked to dual-channel ABS.

Although no exact timeline for its launch has been confirmed, we won’t be surprised if this motorcycle reaches production within a span of a year.

Every Angle of the New BMW R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental in Huge Gallery

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

BMW Shows Every Angle of the New R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental in Huge Gallery

Enough time has passed since BMW pulled the wraps off the new members of the R 18 family, the B and Transcontinental, so the enthusiasm about them might have gone down a bit. In an attempt to remind people these new two-wheelers are ready to hit the roads, the Bavarians threw online yet another huge gallery showing the motorized beasts.

You can enjoy most of them on BMW Website, and you can top them off with the already large set of pictures BMW released when the bikes were unveiled. Before you get into that though, a quick reminder about what these ones are all about.

The R18 came into existence more than a year ago, as BMW’s return to the cruiser segment. Being such an important model, it was gifted with the most “powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production.” Called Big Boxer, it is a piece of 1,802cc in displacement and rated at 91 hp at 4,750 rpm, and a maximum of 158 Nm of torque at 3,000 rpm.

Before the two new models were introduced, the family comprised the standard cruiser and the Classic. And now there are four.

The B, which is supposed to stand for bagger, comes with a low windshield, slimmer seat, and a large fairing. The Transcontinental on the other hand is fitted with a larger windshield, additional headlights, and a top case at the rear.

Both hold in their frames the same engine we mentioned earlier, not modified in any way, and are gifted with a larger fuel tank, 10.5-inch TFT screen, and even an area with inductive charging for smartphones. Three riding modes, Rain, Roll, and Rock, are on deck to help riders better navigate their way, and each bike is fitted with automatic stability control and drag torque control.

On the U.S. market, the cheapest R 18 is the standard one, which sells for $15,995. The most expensive is the Transcontinental, priced at $24,995, while the B sits somewhere in between, at $21,945.

New Photo Galleries on Bikernet.com Updated Regularly

By General Posts

There are New Photo Galleries on Bikernet.com Updated With Every New Event

Check Out the Photos by Jack McIntyre at Cantina Section of Bikernet.com

There’s nothing like the warm Florida sun. Daytona Biketoberfest is a classic example of great riding, weather, and a nonstop 4-day long party. From the super-beautiful beer tub gals to the assortment of motorcycles, events, contests, and bands, it’s simply a stunning Bikefest to attend.

This gallery is only from the first Thursday, 10/14/21. Much more to come as out photographers creep around and shoot everything & everyone, especially the sun-tanned skin of the gals on Main Street.

CLICK HERE To View the Latest Photos from Biketoberfest 2021 on Bikernet.

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