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The IIHS: When a New Study is Not New and Not a Study

By General Posts

By Gary Biller, NMA President

Every two or three years, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) splashes the media with a recycled report of how many deaths have occurred due to raised speed limits. And reporters dutifully echo it as gospel because sensational headlines like, “Speed limit increases are tied to 37,000 deaths over 25 years,” grab attention and generate views.

That is the current press release title from IIHS for a just-issued report that is a rehash of a similar effort from 2016. The claim from the insurance industry advocacy group made back then, with uncanny precision for a methodology based almost entirely on assumption and extrapolation, was that 32,894 people died from higher speed limits since the 55 mph National Maximum Speed Limit (NMSL) was repealed. This skeptical review of that IIHS claim three years ago could serve just as well in critiquing the 2019 IIHS repeat of the “speed kills” mantra.

Perhaps my favorite quote in the current reporting of the IIHS release is this from Axiom’s “Slow the hell down:”

“ ’Every time you raise speed limits, you see more deaths,’ said IIHS vice president for research and statistical services Charles Farmer.”

It isn’t necessary to stretch our advocacy muscles even a tiny bit to show this as provably false. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System Encyclopedia publishes annual highway fatalities rates. Speed limits have climbed steadily since the full repeal of the NMSL in 1995, commonly reaching 75, 80 and even 85 mph, and yet fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled have plummeted:

1995                1.73
2000                1.53
2005                1.46
2010                1.11
2015                1.15

The 2017 fatality rate of 1.16 marks a 33 percent reduction over the past 22 years. Mr. Farmer sees statistics differently than most, but then again, that is evident in how his organization reports its conclusions.

To see who benefits from the posting and enforcement of lower speed limits, look no further than the list of auto insurers that wholly fund the IIHS.

As TheNewspaper.com observed about the 2016 IIHS report, “. . .there is a financial reason for the insurance industry’s advocacy of artificially low speed limits. Every ticket issued on an underposted road raises the insurance premium for the ticketed driver, increasing the industry’s profit.”

What was true then is true now.

Salt Torpedo Action Update Chapter 16

By General Posts

Making Move on Everything!

The last few weeks have been interesting and challenging. We are actually getting close to watching the Salt Torpedo sit on its own three wheels with the help of Yelvington Shocks.

This week we could finish the steering system. We could link the steering with the wheels. We could have a gas tank mounted. We are getting damn close to making a battery mount, and then hooking up the drive line for a run around the block.

READ the True Story of the First Streamlined trike to be registered for Bonneville Salt Flats racing. CLICK HERE.

Join the Cantina. Check out the new Hal Robinson Tee-shirts and 5-Ball Racing Special Op Vest.

http://shop.bikernet.com/

Ride Forever!!!

Yamaha Expects India to Become its Largest Production Base in 5 yrs

By General Posts

Markets in Indonesia, Vietnam saturating; India priority No. 1, says top executive.

Japanese auto major Yamaha Motor Company (YMC) expects India to overtake Indonesia to emerge as its largest base in terms of production output in the next five years.

“India sells more than 20 million two-wheelers annually and the numbers are growing. Our company’s market share is in single digits. We want to improve this. There is a lot of opportunity,” says Yamaha India Chairman Shitara.

Two-wheeler sales in India increased 6.95% to 19,740,727 units till February this fiscal. In the same period, India Yamaha Motor’s sales remained largely flat at around 732,006 units. The company additionally exported 226,010 units.

Yamaha Motor India’s group chairman Motofumi Shitara was speaking on the sidelines of the launch of MT-15 priced at ₹1.36 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi).

“India is priority number one for us worldwide. We aim to have production volume of 2.5 million units in India in the next five years,” he said.

Going ahead, Shitara said the company would steer clear of the mass segment and focus on launching premium motorcycles in the domestic market. The company has also commenced a study on introducing electric two-wheelers in India.

Shitara is currently defining the mid-term roadmap for the company till 2025 to lay the foundation on how the brand Yamaha takes shape the country. Apart from growing volumes, Shitara said a focus area for him is to project a strong image for the Yamaha brand in the local market.

Yamaha MT-15 was launched on Friday – a 155cc bike with liquid-cooled four-stroke engine mated to a six-speed transmission. MT-15 is priced at Rs 1.36 lakh ex-showroom. It has ABS and fuel injected variable valve actuation (VBA).

On the idea of electric motorcycles, the Yamaha Chairman says – “Three points are important, one is performance. Second, is price control. And third, infrastructure for battery charging. These three issues we should answer (for electric vehicles to take off)”, Shitara said.

Zero introduces bold new SR/F Electric Streetfighter

By General Posts

Zero launched a new SR/F streetfighter in Amsterdam, which claims to deliver an attractive blend of “industry-leading power, control and connection.”

It is a tangible improvement in range capability and recharging time, along with new styling that brings its electric powertrain with sharp and conventional – naked streetfighter looks.

The Californian brand leaps forward making electric motorcycles look and perform in a way more appealing to both new and largely electric-phobic existing bikers.

Vice President of Product Development, Brian Wismann, said: “The bike was inspired and influenced by the same things that inspire designers that are working on internal combustion bikes. “I don’t want anybody to think that this was meant to look like an electric Ducati, or Triumph – it’s not a derivative design, but having an understanding of where this cultural reference for having beautiful machines comes from and then integrating some of those design elements into the SR/F are pertinent in describing why it looks as good as it does.”

New Zero SR/F specs

  • 200-mile range potential
  • One-hour charge to 95%
  • Makes 110bhp / 140lbft
  • Two models available in May
  • Weight is 226kg

Zero’s new SR/F has the power and charm to attract regular street racers. The torque makes this a serious streetfighter.

The model uses Zero’s new ZF75-10 motor, coupled to a ZF14.4 lithium-ion battery. The powertrain uses air-cooling to improve longevity. It eliminates many routine maintenance jobs. A single charge is claimed to have the potential to deliver a 200-mile maximum range when ridden at town speeds, using Zero’s Power Tank, which arrives in Autumn 2019.

The innovative Rapid Charge System works on the large and growing network of Level 2 charge stations and provides a platform that allows for up to three independent charging modules. This means the SR/F can boast the fastest recharge capacity in Zero’s existing line up. It gives a maximum charging performance of empty to 95% charged in just one hour.

SR/F’s Cypher III operating system knits Zero’s next-gen app and dash to the well-proven Bosch Motorcycle Stability Control (MSC) system, ensuring the rider isn’t caught out by an over-eager right wrist or brake lever action. Zero SR/F has ABS and a host of electronic safety kit to ensure rider safety on the mean streets it is meant to race on.

The attractive dash can connect to a new app controlled by the rider. Rider modes on offer comprise Street, Sport, Eco, and Rain, and there are up to 10 programmable custom modes available.

Brembo’s electronic braking AI acts on JJuan calipers front and rear. The frame is a steel-trellis with concentric swingarm that’s claimed to help transfer the torque to the tarmac with the most mechanical grip possible. Both the battery and motor act as stressed members as well.

The new connected app also allows the rider to monitor their SR/F for: Bike Status & Alerts, Charging data, Ride Data Sharing, System Upgrades and Updates.

The first system of its kind on a production motorcycle, the status checker means owners can see information on charging interruptions, get unexpected motion notifications, and use the ‘Find my Bike’ function to see if their bike is where it should be.

The data captured on rides includes bike location, speed, lean angle, power, torque, charge and energy used/regenerated.

All the data is private unless the rider chooses to share it. The full suite of app functions are free at purchase, and for two years thereafter. Riders can opt out altogether if they so desire.

The two models will come in Seabright Blue and Boardwalk Red colourways, and are expected to be ready to plug in from May 2019.

Rewaco Trikes USA : Thrilling Threesome

By General Posts

Rewaco Trikes USA : Thrilling Threesome
Innovative Triking from a German company blows out the competition
by Ujjwal Dey

I have seen the future of Trikes in America and it is called REWACO. Incredible trikes and a pro-range of models with the bonus benefits of customization, comfort, ready-to-tour, financing and eye-candy.

The optional Power-Shifter on the handlebar – operated on demand in ″SP-Sport-Mode″ – can turn this sweet regal lamb into a speedy mile-hungry wolf.

The broad classification after selecting a purchase model is:
1. Engine Variations
2. Equipment Packages such as Classic or Dynamic
3. Colors
4. Choice of Wheel set in Alloy
5. Further Special Options to make you drool on its fender, frame extenstion, footrests, ABS, handlebar, navigation system, safety lock system, etc.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FEATURE ARTICLE

BMW Engine Trikes: Campagna Motors T-Rex

By General Posts

BMW Engine Trikes: Campagna Motors offers luxury, performance & style
Part One of a detailed profile of Campagna Motors Trikes
by Ujjwal Dey

Did you know that the T-REX has been commercially available since the early 1990s.

Riding the T-Rex will make you feel like you own your personal Formula 1 Race Car for everyday city streets and highways, wiht 1.3 G, which is difficult to obtain even in a mainstream production car. It’s just 5 inches from the ground. It is wide, maybe wider than some production cars. Going top gear will push you back in the seats like a rolling rollercoaster through city streets. This however is not a car. It is a motorcycle.

Basically if you are not a regular motorcycle rider then you will be scared shitless on a T-Rex at full throttle, so close to the road, neighbouring truck wheels and your own bouncing front wheels.

No matter what your riding or driving background, T-Rex is a unique experience unmatched in speed and control. It is literally a street legal Formula 1 racetrack vehicle.

READ THE FEATURE ARTICLE CLICK HERE.