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Man robs Historic Harley Davidson, Topeka police find within 24 hours

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by Mark Feuerborn, Kelli Peltier from https://www.ksnt.com/

TOPEKA, Kan. (KSNT) – A local motorcycle vendor and museum thanked the Topeka Police Department after a man stole cash and property from their building.

29-year-old Floyd Earl Taylor III, the man accused of breaking into Harley-Davidson in Topeka, is in jail.

Harley Davidson of Topeka’s general manager, Eli Geiger, said a burglar broke in on Monday night.

“It was a sinking feeling. You know it’s a terrible feeling,” Geiger said.

The burglar got away with money, merchandise, and even took items belonging to employees.

Police were able to find the suspect the next day.

“The detective work was spot on, they were quick and very thorough and led to an arrest,” Geiger said.

Officers arrested Taylor on Tuesday at the Capitol Plaza hotel and found all of the stolen items.

Taylor faces charges of burglary and theft of items and cash totaling more than $1,500, according to his booking record. Taylor also faces an additional charge for possession of a controlled substance.

Taylor is in the Shawnee County Jail on a combined $20,000 bond.

Prescott man gets 4 years in prison after high-speed chase on stolen motorcycle in Ohio

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from https://www.dcourier.com

ZANESVILLE, Ohio — A 20-year-old Prescott man was sentenced to four years in prison after leading officers on a high-speed chase through two counties in Ohio last week.

Andrew Johansen was sentenced Monday after pleading guilty to three felony counts.

According to prosecutors, some time before Dec. 11 Johansen answered an ad for a motorcycle for sale in Canton, Ohio. He asked to test drive the motorcycle and drove away with the bike.

On Dec. 11, an officer tried to stop a silver Honda motorcycle on I-70 in Cambridge, Ohio. The driver, later identified as Johansen, refused to comply and sped away, reaching speeds of up to 130 miles per hour.

After leading officers and state troopers on a high-speed chase that continued on and off the interstate and through heavy traffic, Johansen eventually lost control of the motorcycle and was taken into custody, police said.

In a statement to media, Ohio State Patrol said they suspected the cold weather affected Johansen’s ability to control the bike. According to the statement, Johansen’s first words to law enforcement were, “I’m cold.” Officers on the scene noted that Johansen was shivering and displayed symptoms of hypothermia at the time of his arrest.

According to Arizona court records, Johansen has a criminal history in Arizona. Since 2017, he has been charged with unlawful flight from pursuing law enforcement, fraudulent schemes and artifices, shoplifting, trafficking in stolen property, failure to appear in court and possession or use of drug paraphernalia. The past charges were filed in Prescott Valley and Yavapai County.

Due to a recent conviction and probation status in Arizona, Johansen agreed to waive his investigation and move to sentencing. He was sentenced to four years for failure to comply, receiving stolen property and obstructing official business.

According to a report by the Zanesville Times Recorder, Johansen apologized to the court and his family at his sentencing hearing.

“I’ve hit rock bottom and I have a long road ahead of me in incarceration,” Johansen said. “I hope to use it to my benefit.”

Prairie Grove PD Ends Motorcycle Chase After Speeds Exceed 160 Mph

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by Nayely Palafox from https://5newsonline.com

PRAIRIE GROVE, Ark. (KFSM) — The Prairie Grove Police Department was in a high-speed motorcycle chase that they ended because the motorcycle’s speed was deemed unsafe to continue.

At approximately 9:06 p.m. last night (Dec. 14), Officer Franks attempted to make a traffic stop on a blue “sport” style motorcycle.

The motorcycle had been traveling westbound on Hwy 62 at approximately 70 mph on a 55 mph zone.

The motorcycle passed the officer and accelerated rapidly to 80 mph.

Officer Franks turned on his lights and siren and the motorcycle began to pull over. Before the motorcycle completely stopped, it made a u-turn in front of the officer, flipped him off and sped away turning eastbound onto Hwy 62.

The high-speed chase then began with the motorcycle reaching speeds of an estimated 160 mph. Sargeant Belew immediately joined the pursuit and Officer Cluck joined soon after.

The motorcycle continued into Farmington where Farmington Officer Talley and Detective Collins joined to assist.

The motorcycle sped through multiple intersections driving around slower moving traffic with “no regard to safety or human life,” according to Prairie Grove PD.

The pursuit continued into Fayetteville where the chase led the officers northbound onto I-49. Once they hit the interstate, the motorcycle reached speeds that officers deemed unsafe to continue the pursuit.

They decided to end the chase near Porter Rd. exit and AR State Police were notified.

Police link South Canberra incidents to outlaw motorcycle gangs

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by Michael Weaver from https://the-riotact.com/

A police taskforce believes a number of shootings and arson attacks committed in South Canberra during the last three months are linked to outlaw motorcycle gangs.

ACT Policing’s Taskforce Nemesis is targeting criminal gang activity in the ACT and believes at least five incidents between September and November this year are linked to outlaw motorcycle gangs.

An ACT Policing spokesperson said at least one of these incidents targeted a home with no known links to outlaw motorcycle gangs.

“We are urging anyone with information or footage of these incidents to contact police, as even a small piece of information may help with inquiries,” the spokesperson said.

The following instances of suspected outlaw motorcycle gang activity are being investigated:

  • About 9:55 pm on 26 September 2019: gunshots were fired at a house on Fraenkel Street, Monash
  • About 10:20 pm on 29 October 2019: gunshots were fired at a house in Fink Crescent, Calwell
  • About 10:40 pm on 29 October 2019: an incendiary device was thrown at a house in Pockett Avenue, Banks
  • About 10:55 pm on 20 November 2019: an aggravated burglary and arson occurred at a house in Chirnside Place, Kambah
  • About 10:10 pm on 25 November 2019: three cars were set on fire at the same residence as a previous incident in Fraenkel Street, Monash.

Police believe these incidents were all specifically targeted and are related to outlaw motorcycle gang activity.

“Officers from Taskforce Nemesis will continue to relentlessly pursue criminal gangs who seek to disrupt the safety of Canberra suburbs,” an ACT Policing spokesperson said.

 

York City Police Department receives motorcycle donation

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by Valeria De Leon from https://fox43.com

York – It’s the season of giving and one York County police department has a new ride thanks to a local organization.

America’s 911 Foundation donated a brand new 2019 Harley-Davidson police motorcycle to the York City Police Department on Saturday.

Each year, the organization gives away a motorcycle to police departments, this one is the 20th one they have donated to police.

Chief Troy Bankert York City Police said the motorcycle unlike a vehicle, helps them spark a conversation with the community and better their relationship.

“It gives us a good opportunity to interact with the community without being inside of a car, it’s more personal but at the same time it lets us have some mobility,” said Chief Bankert.

“These are people who protect us and put their lives on the line every day,” said Roger Flick, America’s 911 Foundation promotions manager, “and they want to keep their community safe and we want to help them do that.”

The organization also holds a motorcycle ride to remember those who lost their lives on September 11th.

The York Police Department takes part in that ride, so organizers said they were more than happy to announce the winners of this year’s raffle.

SA Police launch first solo road safety campaign with a focus on the safety of motorcyclists

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by Steve Rice from https://www.perthnow.com.au

Motorcycles – there’s a lot riding on it. SA Police’s first solo road safety campaign intermingles the process of starting a bike with candid moments of a father’s life. You’ll ride slower after this.

The campaign – the first since the Motor Accident Commission was wound up in June – focuses on motorcycle riders and specifically men, who are most at risk while on the road.

It emphasises the need for them to return home safely and shows a variety of invaluable life elements – partners, children and pets – that would be lost if they died.

Police say riding motorcycles is a dangerous form of transport because of low visibility and minimal protection on the roads and that men are over represented in casualty crashes.

Motorcyclists comprise 15 of the state’s 89 road fatalities so far this year, compared with 10 for the whole of 2018.

The greatest representation of motorcycle-related serious injuries last year were men aged 50-59 followed by men aged 30-39.

SA Police acting Assistant Commissioner Dean Miller said the campaign aimed to address attitudes towards motorcycle riding.

“Police are committed to improving road safety to reduce road deaths and serious injury crashes on South Australian roads,” he said.

“We believe this is a very balanced approach to changing road user behaviour, particularly for motorcyclists. It contributes to our overall goal to make our roads safer for every road user.”

Police Minister Corey Wingard said the campaign was hard-hitting and would make an impression on motorcycle riders.

“We as a Government needed to look at better ways of tackling road safety,” he said.

“SAPOL is in a unique position when it comes to road safety issues as they see first-hand the trauma that can occur on our roads.

“I applaud SAPOL for this powerful campaign and I’m hopeful it will resonate with all those who see it.”

The campaign production also generated 47 locals jobs and injected money back into the South Australian economy.

Texas Bikers Stop VFW’s No MC Colors Policy

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from https://www.motorcycleprofilingproject.com/

The National Council of Clubs, representing the interests of motorcycle clubs and thousands of their members in every state in America, is both concerned and appalled at recent reports of Veterans organizations, including some VFW, American Legion, and Eagles posts, among others, denying access to individuals expressing membership in motorcycle clubs.

So what’s the solution? The Texas Council of Clubs & Independents recent campaign in response to a policy of discrimination announced by the state VFW serves as an example of a successful strategy for others facing similar acts of discrimination by private Veterans organizations in their states.

Texas VFW General Orders of discrimination

Dated October 2019, the Department of Texas VFW sent General Orders to all VFW Posts throughout the state outlining a new written policy which includes a provision excluding all 1% MC members, employing gang labeling, from VFW events and property.

The TCOC&I quickly became aware of the General Orders through local VFW posts in numerous areas of the state and immediately began a campaign responding to the new policy of discrimination. Motorcycle clubs have a long history of having events at VFW posts, many motorcyclists are members, and relationships are strong in many places in Texas, as they are throughout America.

TCOC&I uses social media to apply pressure

Representatives of the TCOC&I began spreading the VFW letter through social media channels. Thousands in Texas and across the country became aware. On October 9th, a direct response from the TCOC&I in the form of a formal letter was sent to the Texas VFW outlining the community’s request that the policy be reversed. The TCOC&I emphasized the historical ties between the MC community and VFW’s throughout Texas. 38% of the club community are Veterans, more than five times the national average. MC meetings, benefits, and social events are a common occurrence.

According to a TCOC&I representative, this letter resulted in a meeting between representatives of both the Texas VFW and TCOC&I, including the local Austin VFW President. On Saturday, October 12, 2019, the TCOC&I emphasized the importance of not allowing the actions of the few influence how the VFW regards all motorcycle clubs, including 1%’ERS, and how they are treated. The TCOC&I also made a formal request for written explanation of the specifics that led to the General Orders and confirmation of a policy reversal. VFW representatives committed to bringing the TCOC&I’s concerns to Keith King, Texas VFW State Commander.

The Texas VFW reverses policy of discrimination

On October 22, 2019 Paul Landers, representing the TCOC&I, reached out to the Texas VFW for an update or statement following the October 12 meeting. Landers was notified that King would meet the following day to personally discuss the General Orders at Issue.

After meeting on October 23 the VFW State Commander opened his mind and listened, according to. Landers.

“King explained that the policy was due to publicized incidents of violence and 1% MC’s in Texas. But after listening to our perspective he changed his perspective. The actions of the few should not impact the rights of the whole. King agreed to a written policy change that does NOT exclude MC’s and 1% clubs from VFW property”, says Landers.

A model response to discrimination

The TCOC&I serves as a model example on how to respond to Veteran organization discrimination against the motorcycling community.

First, social media channels were flooded with the VFW’s General Orders in order to increase awareness and generate independent complaint streams. The more individuals that reach out and complain means the more leverage an official complaint will have.

Second, an official complaint and request for policy reversal was drafted and sent to the Texas VFW. The complaint outlined the close connection between MC’s and Veterans and argued the VFW is profiling and discriminating against the very people they exist to serve.

Third, meetings were arranged with VFW representatives in order to resolve the issue. Capable spokespersons persuaded the VFW to not punish all MC members for the actions of the few. The final result was a reversing a discriminatory policy.

The entire TCOC&I campaign was implemented and completed within days of the original letter being sent by the VFW. The campaign was cost-free and 100% relied upon active volunteer participation.

Conclusions

The shortsighted policy of excluding MC’s from Veteran’s organizations is appalling and unacceptable. Many in the MC community are loyal veterans, and Americans, and should not be the target of discrimination at home, particularly at the hands of other Veterans.

The TCOC&I blueprint can be modeled and implemented anywhere, in any state. No need to recreate the wheel.

Silence is consent.

Hundreds of drunk scooter riders lost their licenses at Germany’s Oktoberfest this year

By General Posts

21 September 2019, Bavaria, Munich: “NO E-Scooter” is on a sign on the way to the Oktoberfest, next to it there are E-Scooters parked. The largest folk festival in the world lasts until 6 October.

by Zac Palmer from https://www.autoblog.com

Drinking and riding carries the same penalty as drunk driving

Oktoberfest just wrapped up in Munich, and surprisingly, there’s some pretty alarming transportation-related news coming from it. Ride-sharing scooters and drunk party-goers don’t make for a good combination, but that’s exactly what German police had to fend with throughout the 16-day-long event.

According to German news outlet Deutsche Welle, and picked up by The Drive, local police say they caught 414 people riding scooters while under the influence. Of those, 254 riders had their driver’s licenses revoked on the spot. Germany treats scooters the same as cars, so there are serious consequences for not following the rules of the road — similar to America, there are repercussions for drunk driving. What remains unreported is how many accidents or injuries occurred as a result of all the drunk scootering.

German police were on high alert when it came to the scooters, as they were just unleashed on the public in June this year. The numbers are slightly better for folks who were driving an actual car in the city of Munich during the festival. Police found 315 drunk drivers and forced 215 of those to give up their licenses immediately.

Millions from all over the globe attend Oktoberfest every year. Beer is consumed in copious amounts in massive beer glasses known as steins — the only size of beer served in the beer tents amounts to 33.8 ounces. Drinking tasty German beer and singing all day may have given some folks a little too much confidence to pilot an E-scooter home rather than walking like the rest of the crowd. Police did a great job of keeping the scooters from entering onto the Oktoberfest grounds, banning their use during the festival itself.

We’ll leave you with a few fairly obvious words of advice: Don’t drink and scoot at the same time. Traveling at the pace of a brisk jog is not worth losing your driver’s license.

Hogs & Heifers served eviction notice, owner vows to keep fighting

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by Joe Bartels from https://www.ktnv.com

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — The Downtown Grand is in a downtown dispute with its tenant Hogs & Heifers. Now the bar has been served an eviction notice and a cease-and-desist letter.

13 Investigates has been following the situation since July when owner Michelle Dell was at odds with her landlord over the use of 3rd Street between Stewart and Ogden in downtown Las Vegas.

Ultimately, the parade and gathering went on as scheduled, but then a new issue emerged.

“For me, I’m fighting the fight of my business, I’m fighting for the 40+ people I employ,” said Dell.

Dell says just 5 days after the Patriot’s Day parade and gathering she hosted, she received a 30-day notice to quit her lease.

The paperwork provided to 13 Investigates shows the bar was required to vacate the premises by mid October.

“I made a massive investment, I changed my entire life to be in [Las Vegas] and I have built a thriving business, I have been a solid contributor to our community and I love this neighborhood,” said Dell, who relocated from New York to start her bar in 2004.

On Tuesday, Dell received a second notice which demanded she stop speaking out against the Downtown Grand.

The letter claims Dell has made and continues to make false statements against the Downtown Grand on both her social media accounts and in the news media.

“On the eve of our 14th anniversary, they have sent us a cease-and-desist letter, claiming I am running a concentrated media campaign to disparage them,” said Dell.

A judge will try and sort things out next month when both sides are scheduled to be in court.

According to documents obtained by 13 Investigates, the courtroom confrontation has been building for years.

Lawyers for the Downtown Grand say Dell and her clientele have been less than ideal, writing in court filings:

“H and H has created an unsafe environment that has consistently spilled into the common areas surrounding the bar.”

“H and H routinely uses a megaphone and vulgar language to solicit pedestrians and guests of neighboring properties into its bar.”

“Numerous police and incident reports have been filed, documenting the dangerous events that are permitted and sometimes encouraged by H and H.”

13 Investigates asked Dell about the incidents and while she admits there have been troubles, including bar fights, she and her security team keep the peace and involve police when necessary

A search of online crime reports show at least 30 incidents ranging from disturbing the peace, to assault, and indecent exposure in the 200 block of 3rd Street within the past 6 months.

13 Investigates reached out to the Downtown Grand’s public relations representative but a did not receive an immediate response.

Dell says she is not backing down and she will fight the battle in court.

Extra staff hired, jail space prepared for Sturgis motorcycle rally

By General Posts

STURGIS, S.D. — Law enforcement agencies in Meade and Pennington counties are hiring more officers, temporarily opening a second jail and keeping a courthouse open seven days a week for the Sturgis motorcycle rally and the hundreds of thousands of free-wheeling visitors it will attract over the next several days.

“We’re already busy,” Sturgis Police Chief Geody VanDewater said before the rally officially began Friday, Aug. 2.

VanDewater wouldn’t say how many temporary officers he hires but said they come from South Dakota, North Dakota, Colorado, Minnesota and other neighboring states. Some are working the rally for the first time while others, like one officer who is returning for his 41st rally, are repeat visitors.

Permanent officers will continue to work 12-hour shifts with no days off during the 10-day event, VanDewater said.

Meade County Sheriff Ron Merwin also hires temporary deputies, mostly relying on the office’s own reserve deputies and officers with Game, Fish & Parks. The Pennington County Sheriff’s Office hired eight deputies from South Dakota and neighboring states and will also have about 10 of its reserve deputies working full-time, said Chief Deputy Willie Whelchel.

The eight temporary deputies are assigned to two-person foot patrols in the office’s contract communities of Wall, New Underwood, Keystone and Hill City, Whelchel said.

The Rapid City Police Department didn’t hire extra staff and isn’t requiring its officers to work overtime as they have in past years, said Captain James Johns.

During the rally, the Meade County court remains open during the weekends and the old jail — located in the basement of the courthouse across the parking lot from the new jail — is reopened, Merwin said. Extra staff from the area is hired to help the corrections officers, but they don’t carry handcuffs or weapons.

The old jail has large group cells made of “old iron bars” and “doors that clang and bang” that hold about 25 people, Merwin said. When people are arrested, they’re first brought to the old jail to be booked and detained until their court date the next morning. Guards take away their belts and shoes for safety reasons, but let them wear their street clothes. If defendants can’t make bond, they’re moved to the new jail.

“Every day, we clean out the old jail and get ready for a new batch,” Merwin said. “It is quite a procedure. It’s been working for years and everybody is pretty conscientious about everybody’s rights, and we try not to do anything different than we do any other time of the year.”

The Pennington County court functions as normal during the rally and while no extra jail staff is hired, workers aren’t allowed to take vacation or do any special training, Whelchel said.
Enforcement priorities

“You name it, we have it here,” VanDewater said about the crimes he sees during the rally.

But he said the most common issues Sturgis police officers deal with are people parking where they’re not allowed to, followed by drunken driving and drug use.

Cars and motorcycles illegally parked in alleys, handicap spots and other off-limits areas are ticketed and towed to impound lots, the police chief said. “If we just leave them there, we’re not fixing the problem.”

“We allow officer discretion. We just ask that the issue is addressed,” VanDewater said when asked if his officers have to let some violations slide since they’re so busy. “We give more verbal warnings than we do citations.”

VanDewater said officers may give warnings to people urinating in public, carrying open alcohol containers and breaking traffic rules by speeding or not wearing a seat belt. But anyone charged with violent crimes or DUIs will be arrested.

“They will go to jail, and we don’t need them hurting themselves or especially someone else,” he said of drunken drivers.

James said most of the Sturgis activity in Pennington County takes place outside city limits, on the highways, and in Wall and the Mount Rushmore areas. Rapid City officers are mostly focused on road safety and noted some popular stores and venues, such as the Harley-Davidson dealership in Rapid City, provide their own security. He said the department’s goal is to make sure things go smoothly and seem normal for those who work and live in Rapid City.

Pennington County deputies focus on traffic safety and stopping drunken drivers as they prepare for six or seven major motorcycle rides that cross through the county, Whelchel said. Deputies make sure they’re visible and stationed around the county so they can quickly respond to emergencies.

“We want to be able to save lives. That’s our goal every day we come to work,” he said.

Whelchel and James agreed that it’s important to distinguish between those who are recklessly breaking traffic laws and those who may make a mistake because they’re tourists who aren’t familiar with the area.

“We got to help educate folks and guide them,” Whelchel said.

James and VanDewater said they’re not worried about how the rally will be impacted by South Dakota’s new law that says permits aren’t needed to carry a concealed weapon. They said officers are already trained to act as if anyone could be armed.