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2020 Zero Motorcycles Zero S review: A naked electric bike

By | General Posts

by Bruce Brown from https://www.digitaltrends.com

Pros
A mature e-motorcycle design
Excellent driving per charge range
No gears, no clutch, no shifting
Powerful brakes and suspension
Inexpensive to fuel and maintain

Cons
Forward-leaning rider posture
Rider and passenger pegs high
Expensive for an entry-level bike

MSRP $10,995.00

Zero Motorcycles‘ 2020 Zero S is the most highly-evolved version of a vehicle with the longest production history in a product class that most people don’t know exists. Most people would be surprised to learn electric motorcycles are on the street today. They’re even more surprised to hear the first arrived over 12 years ago.

Founded in 2006 by a former NASA engineer, Zero Motorcycles’ first production model was the 2009 Zero S, making 2020 its 12th model year. Depending on the buyer’s choice of installed power pack, the Zero S price varies from $10,995 to $18,390. The most powerful (and expensive) Zero S has a 223-mile maximum city driving range.

Design and performance

I asked Zero Motorcycles to suggest which model in its nine-model 2020 lineup would be the best choice for an e-bicycle rider who wanted to pick the Zero as their first motorcycle. After discussing the lighter, taller, more off-road-bike-looking Zero FXS, I decided on the Zero S with the lowest power battery pack. I tested the base 7.2 kWh Zero S, priced at $10,995, which the company describes as “ideal for the first time rider looking for an entry-level street motorcycle.”

The 2020 Zero S base model ticks the boxes for e-motos. Acceleration is immediate with the S’s full torque on tap from a standing stop. Other than tire noise and a slight whirring sound from the carbon fiber drive belt, the bike is quiet. There’s no clutch and no shifting because there’s only one gear. So, as with most electric motorcycles, you don’t need to know how to use a manual transmission to ride it.

To ride the Zero, just turn the key and wait a few seconds for the indicators on the display panel to settle down. Zero includes two throttle intercepts to protect riders from unintentional acceleration from a standing stop. A motor stop switch on the right-hand grip cuts out power to the motor, and the bike won’t move if the kickstand is down.

The Zero remains silent when it’s on and ready to move. If you’re only familiar with vehicles that have gas or diesel engines, the lack of noise may lead you to think it’s not on. Oh, but it is. It definitely is.

I was cautious with the throttle at first. Electric motors can deliver full torque from a standing stop, so it’s a good idea to approach with caution. However, I’m happy to report you can ride comfortably at slow speeds on the Zero S. The throttle isn’t overly sensitive, with excellent “feel” and granularity.

The Zero S’s regenerative braking slightly recharges the battery when you roll off the throttle. If you’re familiar with engine braking in a car with a manual transmission, regenerative braking feels roughly the same, just quieter.

If you need to stop quickly, the Zero S’ brakes have more stopping power than you may ever need. I found the learning curve for modulating the potent brake system steeper than getting used to the throttle. The Zero S has Bosch ABS disc brakes, with dual 320mm calipers in front, and a single 240mm caliper in the rear.

This nearly-naked sportbike has no fairing and little bodywork covering the functional components. The rider geometry (the relative positions of the handlebar, seat, and rider footpegs) requires a moderately forward-leaning posture. Forward-leaning is excellent for going fast and carving turns and canyons. Entry-level riders with previous experience on a more upright bike will need to adjust, but not as dramatically as with more aggressive bikes.

Speed and range

Motorcycle companies are typically cautious with quoting acceleration numbers. I didn’t time my runs, but I have heard from others Zero riders that 60 mph comes in under 4 seconds. My butt says that’s about right and, speaking as someone who’s not a veteran rider, it was exhilarating.

My test bike, with the basic 7.2 kWh power pack, has a 98 miles per hour (mph) maximum top speed with a sustained top speed of 80 mph. The rated driving ranges for the Zero S with the base power pack are 89 miles in city driving, 45 miles at 70 mph on the highway, and 60 miles combined.

If you are willing to pay for more range, the Zero SR, which is essentially the same bike, has a 14.4 kWh battery pack. The SR starts at $15,495 and boosts the range to 179 miles for city driving, 90 miles on the highway, or 120 miles combined. For the maximum possible driving distance with Zero S models, you can also add the 3.3 kWh Power Tank for $2,895. The Zero SR with the Power Tank is rated for a maximum of 223 miles in the city, 112 miles on the highway, or 150 miles combined.

Note that larger power packs don’t just drive up the price. They weigh more. The 7.2 kWh Zero S weighs 313 pounds. The Zero SR with the 14.4 kWh power pack weighs 408 pounds, and if you add the 3.3 kWh Power Tank for a total of 18 kWh, the weight climbs to 452 pounds.

Your choice will balance cost, range, and weight. You can’t switch power packs or add the Power Tank later, so it’s essential to buy the right power combination from the start.

Charging the battery

The Zero S has a 1.3 kW integrated battery charger and a thick power cable that plugs into a standard 110/220 power plug. Charging the Zero S requires 4.7 hours for a 95% charge, or 5.2 hours to charge 100%. With a $600 optional quick charger, it takes 3.1 hours for a 100% charge, or 2.6 hours for 95%.

A third option is to buy an optional Charge Tank ($2,495). With the Charge Tank, you can plug into a standard Level 2 charge station for a 95% charge in one hour, or 100% in 1.5 hours. Note that you can’t order a Zero S or SR with both the Power Tank and Charge Tank options.

Riding modes and app

The Zero S has two preset performance profiles, Eco and Sport. The profiles control maximum speed, torque, and regeneration levels.

As set by the factory, Eco mode cuts the top speed to 70 mph, limits the torque, and dials up the regen-style engine braking effect. Sport mode unlocks the top speed of 98 miles per hour, full torque, and little or no regenerative braking. You can customize both profiles with Zero’s mobile app.

I rode the Zero S most of the time in Eco mode through suburban neighborhoods, in small towns, and on country roads and highways. The Zero S is well-balanced, so riding slowly is easy. I quickly became used to its smooth throttle operation to roll on speed as desired. The dialed-up regeneration setting in Eco mode meant I rarely needed to use the brakes until I came to a full stop.

It’s quiet. Too quiet?

Electric motorcycles’ are silent, and that can be a mixed blessing. Motorcyclists are used to noise alerting pedestrians and other drivers, but you don’t get that with an electric powertrain. It’s a good idea to locate the horn button on the left grip, so you can alert anyone who needs it.

The upside of running silent is there’s less chance you’re going to disturb your neighbors with the Zero S, and certainly not with the noise. On one of my first rides checking out the bike’s operation, a neighbor used to seeing me on e-bikes came over to check out the Zero S.

“That’s an actual motorcycle?” he asked. I was able to answer without raising my voice over the Zero S’ motor because, of course, it was silent. On a regular motorcycle, I wouldn’t have even heard him unless I stopped and turned off the engine.

Our Take

I thoroughly enjoyed riding the Zero S, and was particularly impressed by its balanced, quiet ride. Seasoned sports bike riders would likely switch right over to Sport mode and fly with it. The power, brakes, and handling are certainly there.

Ease of operation makes the Zero S accessible for beginning riders. My only hesitation is that new riders will need to get used to the forward-leaning riding position.

Is there a better alternative?

In a few years, there will be many more choices for people shopping for electric motorcycles, but Zero already has a 12-year lead. No other company has Zero’s experience and range of current electric models.

The Harley-Davidson Livewire makes fans of most who ride it, and Harley has been showing other concept electric bikes, but the Livewire’s $30,000 price tag limits its appeal. The Lightning Motorcycles LS-218 is the fastest production motorcycle, but starts at $38.888. Both bikes target experienced riders with money to spend.

Several companies make much smaller e-motorcycles, like the Ubco 2×2 and the Cake Kalk OR. They’re more affordable, but often focused on off-road or multi-surface riding, with a lower top speed and less range.

How long will it last?

Zero Motorcycles include a two-year general warranty and a five-year warranty on the power pack. Zero is an established company with dealers throughout the United States, so parts and service shouldn’t be concerns.

Should you buy one?

Yes. If you want an electric motorcycle for recreational riding or commuting, the Zero S is a great choice.

Harley-Davidson’s acting CEO Zeitz sees potential to revitalize motorcycle brand

By | General Posts

Following a tough fiscal 2019 where U.S. Harley-Davidson motorcycle sales were the lowest in at least 16 years, the Milwaukee manufacturer announced Feb. 28 that Matthew Levatich stepped down as president and CEO. Current Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG) board member Jochen Zeitz will serve as acting president and CEO.

Harley-Davidson appoint Jochen Zeitz as president and CEO

Jochen Zeitz also served as the chairman and CEO of the sporting goods company, Puma from 1993 to 2011.

Harley-Davidson board of directors have appointed Jochen Zeitz as acting president and CEO; Matthew Levatich steps down.

American bike maker, Harley-Davidson announced that the board of directors have appointed present board member, Jochen Zeitz as acting president and CEO. Matthew Levatich has stepped down from his role as the president and CEO and as a member of the board.

Speaking on his new role, Jochen Zeitz said, “The Board and Matt mutually agreed that now is the time for new leadership at Harley-Davidson. Levatich was instrumental in defining the More Roads to Harley-Davidson accelerated plan for growth, and we will look to new leadership to recharge our business. On behalf of the Board, I would like to thank Matt for his 26 years of service to Harley-Davidson. He has worked tirelessly to navigate the company through a period of significant industry change while ensuring the preservation of one of the most iconic brands in the world.”

Furthermore, a board committee is being formed, and the OEM will use an external search firm to find a new CEO. Levatich will be assisting the transition through the end of March. As part of this leadership change, Zeitz has also been named chairman of the Board and will remain chairman once the new CEO is appointed. The current chairman of the Board, Michael Cave will be the presiding director.

Zeitz added, “The Harley-Davidson Board and leadership team will continue to work closely together as we search for a new CEO. We have confidence that our combined leadership experience and deep understanding of Harley-Davidson will ensure an effective transition. As a passionate Board Member of Harley-Davidson, I look forward to continuing to work with my colleagues and other Harley-Davidson stakeholders to advance and deliver the company’s strategy and execution during this important time.”

Zeitz has been a member of the Harley-Davidson Board of Directors since 2007 and established the company’s Brand and Sustainability Committee. “I am very fortunate to have spent many years with a company as revered as Harley-Davidson,” Levatich pointed out. “The grit and determination of the employees and dealers and their passion for bringing our brand of freedom to people around the world has always been inspiring. I am proud of what we have achieved during my time as CEO, in one of the most challenging periods in our history, and I am confident that the progress we have made on the More Roads plan will position Harley-Davidson for long-term success.”

Jochen Zeitz also served as the chairman and CEO of the sporting goods company Puma from 1993 to 2011. He was also Puma’s CFO from 1993 to 2005. Zeitz served as a director of luxury goods company, Kering (formerly PPR) from 2012 to 2016. He was a member of Kering’s Executive Committee and CEO of its Sport and Lifestyle division between 2010 and 2012. Zeitz is also a board member of the Cranemere Group and is on the Board of the ‘B Team’ which he co-founded with Sir Richard Branson.

Harley-Davidson Pulls The Wraps Off The 2020 Softail Standard

By | General Posts

by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://autos.yahoo.com/

Well, that didn’t take long. Just a week ago, Dustin was telling you about the impending Harley-Davidson 2020 Softail Standard revival. Today, the Motor Company made its official announcement, and it turns out Dustin’s speculation was right on the money when he suggested that it could be a base model waiting to be customized. Let’s take a look.

The 2020 Softail Standard is intended to bring a stripped-down, minimalist cruiser experience to the Harley-Davidson Big-Twin lineup. If you’re all about that Milwaukee-Eight 107 V-Twin engine, and a smooth, uncomplicated, black-and-chrome aesthetic, then the new Softail Standard might just be for you.

Right out of the box, you’re looking at a straightforward, visually well-balanced bobber. The solo saddle curves up nicely to draw your attention back to that blacked-out, chopped rear fender, while your eye has no choice but to rest on the Milwaukee-Eight that beats at the heart of the whole thing. The two-into-two offset shotgun exhaust harks back to the slightly unbalanced look of the original, but gives it a more symmetrical, finished look. I’d personally go for a slightly bigger headlight, but keep the same shape and finish—and hey, that’s what customization is for, right?

You get a 19-inch front wheel and a 16-inch rear, both laced. The rear mono-shock has a preload adjuster you can access by simply lifting up the saddle. Front and rear disc brakes are standard, and ABS is an available option. The fuel tank has a 3.5-gallon capacity. This newest member of the Big Twin family can be yours for an MSRP of $13,599.

It wouldn’t be Harley without accessories, so you have a choice of four packages to start with. Three of them feature passenger seating and footpegs, and the fourth is all Screamin’ Eagle, all the time. The Day Tripper, Coastal, and Touring Custom packages range in price from $1,049.95 to $1,699.95, and offer different styles and configurations to get out of town with your favorite passenger riding behind you.

Meanwhile, the Performance Custom package runs $1,299.95, and includes Screamin’ Eagle Stage II Torque Kit, Pro Street Tuner, Heavy Breather Performance Air Cleaner, and Street Cannon mufflers.

Zero’s SR/S electric motorcycle promises up to 201 miles of range

By | General Posts

by Steve Dent from https://www.engadget.com
by Alex Perry from https://mashable.com

You can also charge the premium model in under an hour.

Like EV owners, electric motorcycle riders suffer from range anxiety. Zero Motorcycles is trying to alleviate that a bit with a new model, the SR/S. It can go up to 201 miles in the city and 103 miles on highways — better numbers than the last SR/F model all around. Best of all, Zero managed to keep the price just above the SR/F by keeping the same platform and introducing a full fairing to improve aerodynamics.

On top of the full fairing, the SR/S has a more relaxed riding position, but otherwise uses the same battery pack and engine as the last model. As more of a sport touring-type bike, it also weighs about 20 pounds more than the 485-pound SR/F. However, it still goes like heck thanks to a 100 horsepower, 140 foot pound motor, hitting speeds up to 124 mph.

The base SR/S can go 161 miles on a charge or 82 miles on the highway, so to get the extra range you’ll need to add the Power Tank option. It takes four hours to charge the base model with a regular charger, or 1.3 hours with the 6 KW rapid charge option. However, you can speed that up to two hours (regular charge) and one hour (fast charge) with the premium bike.

Other features include the Cypher III operating system that can handles traction control, braking and charging, along with connected capabilities that lets the owner monitor bike status, alerts, system upgrades and more. The SR/S is now available starting at $19,995 (compared to $19,495 for the SR/F), or $21,995 for the premium model. The 3.6 kWh Power Tank option runs an additional $2,895 and will be available starting March 1st.

Zero’s new SR/S electric motorcycle has a new design and increased range

If you want to roam cities and highways in style without relying on a single drop of gasoline, Zero’s newest electric motorcycle might be up your alley.

Zero invited members of the press to an unveiling of its new SR/S e-bike on Wednesday. It has a sleek new design compared to its SR/F counterpart, and was designed with aerodynamics in mind, according to Zero. This should allow 13 percent more range at highway speeds once riders are fully leaned in, the company says.

As far as more detailed specs are concerned, the SR/S boasts 140 ft-lbs of torque, 110 horsepower, and a top speed of 124 mph. Its city range by default is 161 miles, while its highway range is 82 miles. Those numbers are bumped up to 201 miles and 103 miles, respectively, with an optional power tank add-on.

The SR/S comes in both standard and premium configurations. The first, with a 3 kW charger, is $19,995, the second, with a 6 kW charger, is $21,995. That power tank we mentioned earlier is an additional $2,895, so expect to spend a good deal more money than the starting price if you want all the bells and whistles.

Oh, and there are two colors: Cerulean Blue and Skyline Silver. We saw the blue version at the press briefing and it looked, well, blue. One last thing to note is that the Zero SR/S is using level 2 electric charging. It seems level 3 charging is still just a little too prohibitive for Zero’s liking. The standard model takes four hours to go from zero to 95 percent battery, while the premium takes two hours. You can cut that down to merely an hour with the 6 kW charger.

It may cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $25,000 to get the SR/S with everything that makes it cool, but it seems like it might be cool nonetheless. Zero said it ships to dealers immediately, so anyone who wants one should look into their local options.

Indian Motorcycle Introduces 2020 Roadmaster Elite With New Custom-Inspired, Two-Tone Paint Scheme

By | General Posts

MINNEAPOLIS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 4, 2020–

Indian Motorcycle, America’s First Motorcycle Company, today announced the return of the Roadmaster Elite with a limited production of 225 motorcycles. As Indian Motorcycle’s premier touring machine, the 2020 Roadmaster Elite takes craftsmanship to a whole new level and delivers a truly one-of-a-kind touring experience. Powered by the Thunder Stroke 116 engine, the 2020 model pairs modern touring amenities with iconic Indian Motorcycle styling.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200204005372/en/

The new Thunder Black Vivid Crystal over Gunmetal Flake paint with off-set red pinstripes and exclusive red elite badging with matching push-rod tubes delivers a new, meaner and sportier look. (Photo: Business Wire)

Each and every Roadmaster Elite undergoes a meticulous paint process that takes more than 30 hours to complete and is finished by hand. The new Thunder Black Vivid Crystal over Gunmetal Flake paint with off-set red pinstripes and exclusive red elite badging with matching push-rod tubes delivers a new, meaner and sportier look. The 19-inch precision machined wheel under the valanced front fender adds to this look, while still maintaining a classic aesthetic.

While a custom-inspired paint scheme means riders will be seen, an upgraded 600-watt PowerBand Audio Plus system means riders will be heard. The PowerBand Audio Plus system delivers exceptional sound and clarity from high-output fairing, trunk, and saddlebag speakers that are 50 percent louder when compared to the stock audio system. The PowerBand Audio Plus system features an enhanced nine-band dynamic equalizer that auto-adjusts specific frequencies to the optimal level at different vehicle speeds to compensate for road, wind, and engine noise to deliver crystal clear sound quality in every riding condition.

“The Roadmaster itself delivers the ultimate touring experience, but the Roadmaster Elite takes that experience to an even higher level, designed specifically for riders who pay attention to each and every detail,” said Reid Wilson, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle. “Whether riding around town or across the country, the Roadmaster Elite is a statement maker – packed with all the modern touring amenities riders would ever need or want, with an aesthetic that is captivating.”

As Indian Motorcycle’s most powerful air-cooled engine, the Thunder Stroke 116 features a new high-flow cylinder head that delivers class-leading performance with 126 ft-lbs of torque. Additionally, three selectable ride modes, including Tour, Standard and Sport, allow riders to adjust the bike’s throttle response to fit their riding preferences. The throttle map for each ride mode was designed with a specific application in mind, resulting in one motorcycle with three distinct personalities.

Further enhancing the ride is the Indian Motorcycle Ride Command system – the largest, fastest, most customizable infotainment system on two wheels. The seven-inch, glove-compatible touchscreen features turn-by-turn navigation, customizable rider information screens, Bluetooth® compatibility, and pairs with the Indian Motorcycle Ride Command mobile app for remote accessibility to key vehicle information. New 2020 connected features include traffic and weather overlays, so riders can plan their ride to avoid traffic and poor weather conditions. Riders can also plan a ride route with up to 100 points on the Ride Command website and wirelessly transfer it to the bike via Bluetooth.

As standard equipment, the 2020 Roadmaster Elite packs premium touring amenities riders have come to expect from an Indian Roadmaster, including a tank-mounted analog fuel and volt meters, rear cylinder deactivation and full Pathfinder LED lighting with driving lights. With a genuine leather two-up touring seat with individual heating for both the rider and passenger, passenger armrests, heated handgrips, backlit switch cubes, and a power-adjustable flare windscreen, the Roadmaster Elite delivers unmatched comfort and an unparalleled riding experience. Standard amenities include, ABS, keyless ignition, weatherproof and remote-locking saddlebags, a spacious trunk that fits two full face helmets, and over 37 gallons of storage space.

Pricing for the ultra-premium Roadmaster Elite starts at $38,999 in the U.S. and $46,999 in Canada. Available at Indian Motorcycle dealers today.

For more information on the 2020 Roadmaster Elite, or to find the nearest dealer, visit IndianMotorcycle.com and follow along on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Kawasaki Announces New Agreement with Roadrunner Financial to Offer Financing for Credit Builders and First-Time Buyers

By | General Posts

Foothill Ranch, Calif. – Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. is pleased to announce a new financing agreement with Roadrunner Financial to offer competitive near-prime loans to Credit Builders with 550-660+ FICO scores. Roadrunner delivers a revolutionary lender experience through digital applications with instant decisions, comprehensive credit coverage, and unbeatable dealer and customer support.

Kawasaki joins a group of Powersports and Outdoor Power Equipment partners that utilize Roadrunner Financial to bring great finance offers to their customers. The relationship with Kawasaki allows Roadrunner to offer an enhanced program with improved near-prime rates with no fees for dealers.

“Roadrunner Financial is a key addition for Kawasaki and our dealers” said Kawasaki Senior Vice President, Sales and Operations Bill Jenkins. “The focus on a near-prime credit program will offer dealers new opportunities for financing customers on Kawasaki powersports products.”

“Roadrunner will give Kawasaki dealers a new tool to close deals that would usually walk out the door.” When asked about the new financing agreement, Jon Vestal, VP of Sales at Roadrunner Financial said, “We’re very excited to strengthen our relationship with Kawasaki. By targeting near-prime, we plan to deliver significant incremental sales for Kawasaki in 2020 and beyond.”

This new Kawasaki program from Roadrunner Financial will be available to Kawasaki dealers starting March 1st, 2020.

About Roadrunner Financial:
Roadrunner Financial offers financing for customers across the entire credit spectrum. Roadrunner’s credit program suite includes ‘Roadrunner Prime’, ‘Roadrunner Credit Builder’ for customers down to 550 FICO, a first-time buyer program, ‘Roadrunner Lease’, and a pre-owned vehicle program.

Founded in 2016 and based in New York, Roadrunner helps dealers finance more customers by taking the traditional hassles of lending and replacing them with one seamless process that can take as little as a few minutes. Roadrunner’s unique financing experience offers instant decisions, electronic contracting, and financing for more than 10,000 vehicles across 40+ Powersports & Outdoor Power Equipment (OPE) OEMs. For more information, please visit www.roadrunnerfinancial.com.

ABOUT KAWASAKI
Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) started full-scale production of motorcycles over a half century ago. The first Kawasaki motorcycle engine was designed based on technical know-how garnered from the development and production of aircraft engines, and Kawasaki’s entry into the motorcycle industry was driven by the company’s constant effort to develop new technologies. Numerous new Kawasaki models introduced over the years have helped shape the market, and in the process have created enduring legends based on their unique engineering, power, design and riding pleasure. In the future, Kawasaki’s commitment to maintaining and furthering these strengths will surely give birth to new legends.
Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. (KMC) markets and distributes Kawasaki motorcycles, ATVs, side x sides, and Jet Ski® watercraft through a network of almost 1,100 independent retailers, with close to an additional 7,400 retailers specializing in general purpose engines. KMC and its affiliates employ nearly 3,100 people in the United States, with approximately 250 of them located at KMC’s Foothill Ranch, California headquarters.
Kawasaki’s tagline, “Let the good times roll.®”, is recognized worldwide. The Kawasaki brand is synonymous with powerful, stylish and category-leading vehicles. Information about Kawasaki’s complete line of powersports products and Kawasaki affiliates can be found on the Internet at www.kawasaki.com.

Bajaj Triumph motorcycle launch in 2022

By | General Posts

Bajaj and Triumph will introduce new affordable motorcycles in India and abroad under a new partnership.

Bajaj Auto and Triumph Motorcycles have formally announced their new partnership to produce a range of mid-size motorcycles and platforms for the Indian and global markets. The decision was initially announced back in 2017, but the formal agreement was signed only now. The partnership will see a positive impact in either brand’s future business in India as well as abroad.

The long-term partnership agreement follows a non-equity approach under which both brands retain their intellectual property rights. Beyond the operational side of the business, motorcycle enthusiasts have been eagerly looking forward to seeing what the partnership would introduce in our market in due course.

Apparently, Triumph will introduce ‘big bike experience’ while Bajaj continues its expertise at making smaller-capacity motorcycles. Both brands will collaborate on the R&D of each motorcycle and platform, but manufacturing will be done solely at Bajaj’s Chakan facility for all global markets. Eventually, Bajaj will take over Triumph India and introduce the iconic British motorcycle brand to newer markets.

This move will also make Triumph motorcycles much more accessible in the country and have an edge over other premium two-wheeler brands. The first-of-the-line products under the partnership will debut in the Indian market sometime in 2022. There is no news of a bigger-capacity multi-cylinder Bajaj motorcycle yet, but there’s no harm in expecting something of that sort.

With the help of Bajaj, Triumph aims to penetrate further into major Asian markets that are currently dominated by the likes of Japanese motorcycles. In markets where Bajaj does not operate, Triumph Motorcycles will sell the upcoming mid-size products alongside its regular portfolio.

Hence, Bajaj will open doors to a new market in major European nations where Triumph Motorcycles leads. On the other hand, the British motorcycle maker will reap an untapped potential present in the lower, affordable, mass-volume segment. More information regarding the upcoming Bajaj-Triumph products will be shared in the coming months and as the launch timelines close in. The products’ naming will be borrowed from the roots of Triumph’s strong heritage.

While it is too early to confirm the exact specifications and output of the upcoming Triumph-Bajaj motorcycles, the partnership aims to make them “aspirational and affordable” with a targeted ex-showroom price tag starting from under Rs 2 lakh. Currently, the Royal Enfield 650 Twins are the most desirable mid-size motorcycles available in foreign markets that offer superior value for money.

With the introduction of the new range of products under the alliance, major rival brands such as Royal Enfield, Harley-Davidson, etc., might have to worry a bit. Harley-Davidson has already anticipated such a scenario and is working on a 338cc motorcycle for the affordable segments in the Asian market.

Royal Enfield 250cc motorcycle to be called Hunter ?

By | General Posts

by Nithyanandh Karuppaswamy from https://www.rushlane.com/

It is no secret that Royal Enfield is working on a whole new range of next generation motorcycles.

Recent reports suggest that the retro-classic specialist is planning to tap into new audience bases. The Chennai-based two wheeler maker is reportedly working on variant extensions to specifically target women and youth.

The recent trademark application by Royal Enfield adds gravity to these claims. The trademark ‘Royal Enfield Hunter’ has been filed by the company and this could be used as a nameplate for one of the new products.

It is too early to speculate on the body style or displacement class of the new thumper in question but if we were to wager, we would put our money on a youthful variant off the new J modular platform which will also underpin the next generation Bullet, Classic and Thunderbird families.

The 2020 Royal Enfield Classic and Thunderbird prototypes have been testing extensively in public, giving us a fair idea on what sort of hardware to expect. The motorcycles receive all new engine, improved frame and continue to employ conventional suspension arrangement (telescopic front fork and gas-charged twin rear shock absorbers). While the bodywork retains the RE identity, every panel seems to be reprofiled subtly to impart a fresh appeal.

Needless to say, the new RE range will feature BS-6 compliant engines. The company is not likely to deviate drastically from the existing displacement classes but considering that the engines are all-new, expect some slight differences in the numbers. Fuel injection will be standard across the range and outputs are expected to increase considerably. Off course, most models will have dual-channel ABS as standard while low-cost variants could settle for single-channel units.

Royal Enfield will start its BS-6 campaign by updating the 650 Twins (Interceptor and Continental GT). The existing Classic 350 will also receive BS-6 update, signalling that the next gen models will not be launched before April 2020. Reports suggest that 500 cc models will be discontinued until their successors are ready sometime in the later part of year.

Like most other two wheeler OEMs in the country, Royal Enfield has been going through a rough patch due to general industry slow down. The new range of products will hopefully help the brand pick up pace.

All-Terrain Adventure Bike from Harley-Davidson

By | General Posts

With Pan American 1250 – Harley Davidson breaks the Hog rules again

The Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 was announced for launch in 2021 and the company’s Instagram suggests we might be able to see this breakthrough bike in dealerships in 2020. First offered for inspection at EICMA show 2019, the excitement is visible and strong.

Brad Richards, Vice President of Styling and Design of H-D mentioned in an interview that they have built a Jeep with two-wheels.

H-D is entering new market segments with two new middleweight models. One is the Pan America 1250 adventure and the other is a 975cc Bronx streetfighter. New Revolution Max engine will be offered in two displacement sizes. A smaller, 975cc engine will power the upcoming Bronx streetfighter, whereas a bigger 1,250cc will power the Pan America.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FIRST FEATURE OF PAN AMERICA

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Kawasaki ZX25R rev sound video – All the way to 17k RPM

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by Abhinand Venugopal from https://www.rushlane.com/

The upcoming Kawasaki ZX-25R hit all headlines in the motorcycle world about two months back, after its official introduction at the Tokyo Motor Show 2019.

With aesthetics resembling its bigger siblings such as the ZX-6R and ZX-10R, the ZX-25R is quite the package for a 250cc motorcycle. The 25R is powered by a 249cc liquid-cooled DOHC ‘four-cylinder’ engine i.e. just over 60cc in each cylinder. The official output figures are not available at the moment, but rumours claim it peaks at almost 60bhp, at around 17,000rpm — yes, you’ve read that right!

Prices are not yet revealed for any region in the world and we see minimal chances of it hitting the Indian market. However, if it does happen to come to your local Kawasaki dealership, expect a price tag of at least Rs 5 lakh ex-showroom; making it more expensive than a Kawasaki Ninja 400 and every other ‘normal’ 250cc motorcycle on the market.

The screaming baby Kawasaki sports bike borrows a lot from its bigger siblings alongside a host of other sophisticated components. The list includes Kawasaki’s horizontal back-link rear suspension, quick shifter, traction control, Showa SFF-BP (Separate Function Fork – Big Piston), dedicated power modes, and a lot more.

This is an odd and interesting combination of facts and figures, but nothing new in the motorcycle world. There have been multiple 250cc i4 models over the years and especially towards the end of the twentieth century, such as the Yamaha FZR250, Honda CBR250RR, Suzuki GSX-R250 and of course, the Kawasaki ZXR250.

These motorcycles may not be as fast as a conventional middle-weight or any other sensible alternative of its time. However, the customer focus is/was different for these low-capacity multi-cylinder motorcycles. They are meant for those who like to ride on the absolute limit — peaking over 15,000rpm in every straight and putting the time’s V10 Formula 1 cars in close proximity in the acoustic department.

As mentioned before, these kind of motorcycles were not particularly fast and government regulations often cut their peak output to around 45bhp, which is available only towards the top of the tacho. For the same reason, they were very subtle in their behaviour at lower revs and could feel like just any other 250cc single (except for the sound).

The interval of the peak output is quite short in some of these motorcycles and riders have to be very precise at their shifts to keep the pull strong, just to harness 45 horses in the straight line. However, as a wise petrolhead once said, “a slower machine (relatively) can always be pushed to the limit, but a faster machine will mostly remain underutilised”.