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Yamaha XSR125 makes global debut

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from https://www.financialexpress.com

Smallest neo-retro XSR to launch in Europe in June.

A new-retro-styled Yamaha has just been revealed which would make fun daily commuter, enter XSR125 – the smallest XSR to date. The Japanese manufacturer is expanding its 125cc portfolio with the XSR125 which is based on the same platform as the MT-125 and R125 but with classic clothing. Although it packs a range of modern features which are quite a necessity now.

Yamaha XSR125 is powered by a 124cc liquid-cooled SOHC engine that puts out 14.7 bhp at 10,000 rpm and 11.5 Nm of torque at 8,000 rpm and is paired with a six-speed transmission. The engine boasts advanced Variable Valve Actuation and is Euro V compliant.

Being a neo-retro, the XSR125 gets a round headlamp casing but with an LED lamp and an LED tail lamp as well, a rounded fuel tank design, and a long flat seat. Bodywork has been kept at its minimal with the underbelly revealing the engine and radiator, but it does get an engine guard.

The instrument cluster is a retro-themed LCD display with a chrome outer finish. Colour options include Redline, Impact Yellow and Tech Black, along with contrasting decals for each.

Suspension setup includes 37 mm upside-down forks and swingarm for the rear and brakes are covered by a 267 mm disc up front and a 220 mm at the rear. Tyre sizes are 110 and 140, front and rear. It weighs in at 140 kg with a seat height of 815 mm, 160 mm ground clearance and a fuel tank capacity of 11 litres.

Ducati Monster 2021 First Ride Review

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Take the edge off.
In 1992, Ducati designer Miguel Galluzzi shoehorned a 900SS engine into an 888 superbike frame. He then bolted on a 750 Supersport fork and the Ducati Monster was born. Galluzzi’s Frankenstein experiment was well-loved though, driving sales at the Bologna brand for years. The parts bin special saved Ducati, in fact, and the Monster has remained in Ducati’s stable ever since.

That hasn’t stopped the Monster from evolving through the years, though. Ducati frequently tweaked the ingredients, but the recipe remained the same: one part air-cooled L-twin, one part trellis frame. However, technology and design move on, and the model has changed with the times. By 2015, all Monster engines switched to liquid-cooling, and the latest iteration finally sheds its trellis frame—and the weight that comes with it.

That prompted traditionalists and ardent Ducatisi to click their tongues, lamenting over Ducati’s heresy. To many fans, the trellis frame was the Monster’s pièce de résistance. The quality that separated the muscular streetfighter from its “soulless” competitors. The trellis frame was the Monster’s greatest strength, but it was also its greatest weakness, imprisoning the naked bike to a bygone era as its counterparts forged ahead.

That’s no longer the case in 2021. Sure, the Monster is still “borrowing” from its counterparts by plucking the 937cc L-twin from the Supersport 950 and wedging it into a Panigale V4-inspried monocoque aluminum frame. Even the model’s 4.3-inch TFT dash sports a Panigale V4-derived interface. Despite those old habits, the question remains: is it still a Monster without the trellis frame? Did it trade in its panache for pastiche? Did it lose its character, its “soul”?

These questions loomed large when Ducati invited us to San Francisco, California, to ride the 2021 Monster. After spending a full day in the saddle of the new bike, it was clear that this is a very different beast.

Engine:
To meet Euro5 emissions standards, Ducati ditched the Monster’s 821cc Testastretta engine in favor of the proven mill found in Ducati’s Hypermotard 950 and Supersport 950. The 11-degree Testastretta configuration carries over, but Ducati bumps the capacity to 937cc for good reasons. That’s 111 good reasons, in the form of horsepower. Ducati couples that with a generous 69 lb-ft helping of torque. More than enough bark and bite for the naysayers.

The powerplant may tout a higher volume than the outgoing unit, but it also shaved off 5.7 pounds in the process. The new clutch drops three pounds alone while the cylinder heads and clutch cover account for two additional pounds of weight loss. The updated gear drum, alternator cover, and pistons and rods pitch in too, saving precious grams.

Ducati’s versatile Testastretta platform isn’t just performance-oriented, however, it’s surprisingly practical as well. New Monster owners can enjoy a whole lot of riding between the 9,000-mile oil services and 18,000-mile valve services. The revised hydraulic clutch also reduces resistance at the lever by 20 percent and the up/down quickshifter nearly eliminates clutch use altogether.

That’s the same Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) Evo 2 found on the $24,095 Multistrada V4 S, and the IMU-dependent system works just as well on this $11,895 naked bike. In fact, the DQS equipped on the Monster produces an even more satisfying exhaust note upon downshifting. Modern emissions regulations have taken the voice box of many a motorcycle, but Ducati’s auto-blipper gives the Monster a formidable growl.

Upshifts were just as visceral, but for an entirely different reason. Though the bike’s fueling was pretty fluttery below 3,500 rpm, the Monster really bared its teeth between 4,000-7,000 rpm. A series of clutchless upshifts only amplified the effect. The power delivery never bordered on frightening, though. Of course, if 111 ponies are too much pep for your step, Ducati’s three ride modes help tame the Monster’s inner animal.

Those looking for an easy-breezy experience can switch to Urban mode, which restricts output to 75 horsepower. For highway blasts, Touring mode maintains peak horsepower but prioritizes smooth acceleration. Predictively, Sport mode is the least restrictive, but that doesn’t make it less manageable than its counterparts. After a short squirt through the hilly San Francisco streets, I kept the engine in Sport mode for the rest of the day. Even in the tight and twisty confines of Route 35, the lively engine response never felt overwhelming. Thanks, primarily, to the new superbike-derived frame.

Chassis:
While the engine’s before/after results were truly impressive, Ducati engineers went to greater lengths to reduce the chassis’ mass. Compared to the 821’s trellis front frame, the new monocoque saves 9.9 pounds. The fiberglass-reinforced polymer subframe comes in 4.2 pounds underweight while the swingarm and wheels reduce unsprung weight by 7.2 pounds. Ducati’s diet plan worked wonders for the Monster, converting the heavy brute to a lithe apex predator.

That new, low 414-pound wet weight is noticeable right off the kickstand. Fleet-footed yet planted, the Monster takes advantage of that newfound agility in the turns. Initial tip-in is effortless and side-to-side transitions are predictable and smooth. That sharp-handling quality should redeem the Monster in the eyes of Ducati fans, but focused track riders may discount the sporty naked bike for lacking fully adjustable suspension.

Speaking of, in stock form, the 43mm USD front end and preload-adjustable lean on the stiffer side. At least they did under my 160-pound frame. Heavier riders may benefit more from the spring rate, but the suspension only borders on harsh at the least favorable time—at lean. Northern California’s Skyline Boulevard is a relatively well-maintained mountain road, but a few inconveniently placed potholes unsettled the Monster’s sure-footed stance.

Of course, no suspension operates optimally when leaned over, but the sharp hit doesn’t just stop at the springs. That new, responsive aluminum chassis also relayed those shockwaves up through to the rider. Luckily, the Monster was quick to regain its composure and continued attacking corners. Aside from those rare moments of instability, though, the Monster handled everything the city and the canyons could throw at it.

Unlike the suspension, the braking system’s pedigree was never in question. Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers bite down on twin 320mm discs up front and a dual-piston binder mates to a 245mm disc out back. A radial master cylinder is the last piece of the puzzle, and it delivers incredible feedback at the lever. Whether navigating downtown traffic or approaching a decreasing radius hairpin, the braking performance was confidence-inspiring.

Of course, losing 40 pounds would help any motorcycle shed speed quickly, but that weight loss also informed the motorcycle’s design and user experience.

Ergonomics:
Ducati went to great lengths to reduce the new Monster’s proportions. Along with losing weight, the bike also lost the visual heaviness of its trellis frame and oversized gas tank. The new dimensions deliver a compact yet comfortable riding position that’s neither too aggressive nor lax.

A 58-inch wheelbase certainly helps with handling but it also relaxes the rider triangle. Ducati pairs that compact cockpit with a handlebar that’s 2.6 inches closer to the rider and footpegs positioned .5 inches lower and 1.5 inches rearward. At 32.3 inches, the standard seat height is easy to flat foot, but those with shorter inseams can also purchase a low seat and a lowering kit that drops the perch to 30.5 inches high.

Before jumping for the accessories catalog, I recommend throwing a leg over the new Monster. Ducati narrowed the seat-to-tank area to maximize stand over comfort, and the strategy worked. However, the narrow stand-over position also introduced my knees to a few Testastretta engine cases. On the left side of the bike, the radiator and water pump plumbing can get in the way and the clutch cover is just as obtrusive on the right. It wasn’t too bothersome throughout the day, but it’s definitely worth mentioning.

Aside from those slight discomforts, the new seating position encourages day-long riding. Stretch to the bars is minimal and the narrow cutouts promote clenching the tank with one’s knees. In turn, the ergonomic position alleviated pressure on my wrists and results in a very pleasant riding experience. In the city, however, the stop-and-go traffic definitely introduced wrist fatigue.

Urban riding also revealed that the Monster had the same heat management issues as its predecessors. At speed, the Monster didn’t throw off an irksome amount of warmth, but from light to light, the new naked bike simply radiated heat. Even in Urban mode, the engine reached high temps. If you’re considering a 2021 Monster, you should also consider living near a highway. The Monster is more play than business and excessive urban environs will get it hot under the collar.

The only other tick against the new-fangled Ducati is that L-Twin’s vibration. Of course, that rumble sets the Monster apart from its parallel-twin rivals, but by 7,000 rpm, the high-frequency buzz prompted early upshifts. The vibration is nearly imperceptible at the pegs, marginally more noticeable at the bars, but it’s most present at the seat cowl. With my tailbone pressed against the seat stop, I could tell when the tachometer was approaching that 7,000-rpm threshold just by the vibration.

Electronics:
I can’t wrap up this review without calling attention to the Monster’s impressive electronic suite. With three levels of ABS cornering, eight levels of cornering traction control, four-leveled wheelie control, and launch control, Ducati’s system presents an absurd degree of customization. With that said, I’m the type of person that likes to set it and forget it. Many customers will love the number of doodads on the middleweight roadster, but others will find what they like and stick to it.

Regardless of which camp you’re in, the rider aids and engine performance options make the Monster a more malleable platform. On the other hand, flipping through the numerous menus would be easier if Ducati consolidated the split function navigation and enter buttons on the left switchgear. Also, many electronic interfaces automatically navigate back to the previous menu when the rider confirms a selection. With the Monster’s system, the user has to manually backtrack.

Even with those minor gripes, the electronics suite is clear and easy to use. That should broaden the model’s appeal as it approaches three decades on the market. It’s clear that Ducati wants to angle the new Monster toward a younger demographic, and it believes robust safety aids and rider modes help those efforts.

While all the ride modes are tractable for seasoned vets, I’d hesitate to put the Monster in a brand-new rider’s hands. The entry-level naked bike may be the perfect first Ducati, but that doesn’t make it the perfect first bike. This new Monster is well-mannered, but it hasn’t lost its claws. Rider aids should be there as a safety net, not training wheels, but the Monster would be great bike for intermediate riders to grow into over the years.

Conclusion:
So, did the Monster lose its “soul” when it lost its trellis frame? No, it didn’t. At the same time, it isn’t the same Monster. It’s more youthful. Yes, the trellis frame’s absence is felt. Without its signature visual cue, the Monster doesn’t stand out from the crowd as much, but it does stand toe-to-toe with the KTM 890 Duke, Triumph Street Triple, and Yamaha MT-09. No, the Monster didn’t lose its “soul” it just developed a playful spirit.

If you’re someone that likes the “oohs and aahs” that come with a Ducati, the new Monster may not be for you. If you want a motorcycle that’s light on its feet, attacks the corners, and just happens to be red, the new Duc should be your cup of tea. The 2021 Monster will suit a wide swath of riders just like it did 28 years ago. Those customers may be different today than they were in 1993 and the Monster will only continue to evolve (without the trellis frame) for the next three decades.

All electric brand separate from the Harley-Davidson brand

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Harley-Davidson launches new electric-only LiveWire brand. Harley-Davidson’s LiveWire is no longer just a model, it’s a whole brand.

The brand’s first dedicated model will debut on July 8.

by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

Pretend you’re Harley-Davidson for a minute. You’re the oldest continually operating American motorcycle manufacturer. You have legions of rabid fans acting as unpaid brand ambassadors. Your name is basically synonymous with motorcycling. Sounds good, right?

Now, as Harley-Davidson, try and do something completely and utterly different than what you’ve done in the past. Now that history is working against you, and those loyal customers think you’ve betrayed the ideals of the brand they love. It’s a real Catch-22. You need to innovate, or you’ll die, but if you innovate, you make your core customers angry, and then you die. While things weren’t actually quite that dire for H-D, it’s definitely been tough.

That’s pretty much what happened when Harley-Davidson launched the LiveWire electric motorcycle a few years ago. Now though, the folks in Milwaukee have decided to try a different route with the whole electric motorcycle thing, and that’s to spin LiveWire off into its own brand, according to an announcement Monday. New brand equals no baggage and that extra freedom to do new things could be just what Harley needs.

“One of the six pillars of The Hardwire Strategy is to lead in electric – by launching LiveWire as an all-electric brand, we are seizing the opportunity to lead and define the market in EV,” Harley-Davidson CEO Jochen Zeitz said in a statement. “With the mission to be the most desirable electric motorcycle brand in the world, LiveWire will pioneer the future of motorcycling, for the pursuit of urban adventure and beyond. LiveWire also plans to innovate and develop technology that will be applicable to Harley-Davidson electric motorcycles in the future.”

The LiveWire brand will have its own models and its network of showrooms, the first of which will be in California. It will be separate from Harley-Davidson in most respects, but it will share technology with the mothership as well as its manufacturing footprint and supply chain.

The first new model from the LiveWire brand is set to debut on July 8, 2021.

Harley-Davidson launches all-electric motorcycle brand ‘LiveWire’
by Reuters from https://www.saltwire.com

Harley-Davidson Inc on Monday launched an all-electric motorcycle brand “LiveWire,” the latest effort by the company to ramp up bets on the rapidly growing electric-vehicle market.

Named after Harley’s first electric motorbike, which was unveiled in 2019, the “LiveWire” division is slated to launch its first branded motorcycle in July.

The company had said in February it would create a separate electric vehicle-focused division, as it aims to attract the next generation of younger and more environmentally conscious riders.

“We are seizing the opportunity to lead and define the market in EV,” Chief Executive Officer Jochen Zeitz said in a statement on Monday.

“LiveWire also plans to innovate and develop technology that will be applicable to Harley-Davidson electric motorcycles in the future.”

BMW celebrates 40 years of GS with Special Editions

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by Inigo Roces from https://mb.com.ph

Easily one of BMW Motorrad’s most popular line of motorcycles is the GS. Standing for Gelände/Straße (on and off-road), the very first model debuted in 1980 in the form of the R80 G/S. The R80 featured innovative technology like the use of the shaft drive, and was later entered into the Paris-Dakar Rally.

Since then, the GS has continued to evolve with its engine displacement growing and the lineup expanding to become the family that we know it as today. To date, BMW Motorrad has been able to hand over more than 1.2 million BMW GS models to customers, worldwide.

In celebration of its 40 years of success, BMW is offering special 40 Years of GS limited edition models, each with a unique livery, across its lineup.

In a virtual launch, BMW unveiled the six motorcycle models that will be sporting this unique livery and features: the BMW G 310 GS, F 750 GS, F 850 GS, RnineT Urban GS, R 1250 GS, and the R 1250 GS Adventure. These special editions will only be available in 2021 in limited numbers while supplies last.

Each 40 Years GS limited edition motorcycle comes with a unique design that pays homage tothe pioneer of the enduro motorcycle segment, the BMW R 100 GS in ‘bumblebee’ livery.

G310 GS
The special edition lineup begins with the G 310 GS (P320,000.00). This most accessible member of the GS family, it comes with ride-by-wire technology, an LED headlight and indicators, adjustable brake and clutch levers, ABS, a stainless steel exhaust, and a luggage rack fitted as standard.

F 750 GS
Next up is the first of the parallel twins, the F 750 GS (P855,000.00). This middleweight adventure bike is fitted with an LED headlight with daytime running lamps and LED indicators, keyless ride system, a 6.5 inch full-color TFT display. It also comes with the enviable electronic riding aids like Riding Modes Pro (Dynamic and Enduro), Gear Shift Assistant Pro, ABS Pro, Dynamic Traction Control with MSR, Tire pressure control and a 12V and USB power socket.

F 850 GS
Higher up on the lineup is the F 850 GS (P975,000.00). Similar to the F750, it has an LED headlight with daytime running lamps and LED indicators, keyless ride system, a 6.5 inch full-color TFT display. It also comes with the enviable electronic riding aids like Riding Modes Pro (Dynamic and Enduro), Gear Shift Assistant Pro, ABS Pro, Dynamic Traction Control with MSR, Tire pressure control and a 12V and USB power socket. The F 850 also gets the enviable gold wheels.

RnineT Urban GS
Easily the hot rod of the family is the RnineT Urban GS (P1,275,000.00). This model will appeal to those that enjoy customizing with its Option 719 cylinder head covers, gold wheels, LED headlight with daytime running light, and speed indicator with on-board computer.

Among its electronic features are ABS, Riding Modes Pro (including Riding Mode Dirt), Cruise Control, an ASC. It doesn’t have to be confined to the city with features like off-road tires and heated grips.

R 1250 GS
Naturally, the flagship R 1250 GS and GS Adventure also get the 40 Years of GS treatment.

These include black and yellow Option 719 cylinder head covers, short sport windscreen in yellow, gold handlebars, gold wheels, full LED headlight with adaptive cornering function and cruising light, keyless ride, and heated grips.

Among its electronic features are Riding Modes Pro (with Dynamic, Dynamic Pro, Enduro, and Enduro Pro modes), customizable modes, Dynamic ESa with automatic load leveling and damping, Gear Shift Assistant Pro, Hill Start Control Pro, and Dynamic Stability Control with Dynamic Brace Control.

They’re now available at all BMW Motorrad dealers.

Yamaha Bolt 2021 bobber-style V-Twin cruiser

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

2021 Yamaha Bolt Cruiser Gets Updated With R-Spec Variant – will be offered in two paint options- Metallic Black or Grayish Blue Metallic.

Yamaha boasts a wide range of motorcycles across a variety of body styles and segments in its international lineup.

The international lineup of Yamaha continues to grow stronger as it has launched an updated version of Bolt in its home market. For reference, the Bolt moniker was first introduced in 2013 as a 2014 model, specifically for the US market. In its upgraded form revealed recently, the big bobber-style cruiser will only be available in the R Spec trim while the base variant has been axed from the lineup.

Traditional Cruiser Styling
The new 2021 Bolt R Spec rides on premium 19-inch front and 16-inch rear alloy wheels with a brushed metallic finish wrapped around by tubeless tyres. The base variant, on the other hand, was offered only wire-spoke wheels.

It flaunts a retro theme styling featuring round headlamps, taillamps, circular instrument cluster and a teardrop-shaped fuel tank. The split-seat design further enhances its bobber stance.

Overall, the cruiser features elegant styling which is accentuated by a beautifully styled engine taking centre stage with a polished crankcase and cooling fins. It will be offered in two colour schemes- Metallic Black or Grayish Blue Metallic. The latter also comes with understated body graphics.

Hardware Setup
Hardware configuration of the motorcycle is kept intact. It is built on a dual cradle frame with the front end suspended on a pair of 41mm telescopic forks. While the rear end is suspended on a set of twin gas-charged shocks with gold-coloured external reservoirs. Anchorage is handled by front and rear 298mm petal disc brakes which are assisted by dual-channel ABS. At a kerb weight of 252kg, it surely is a very hefty machine. The fuel tank can hold up to 13-litres of fuel.

Engine Specs
Coming to its performance, it is powered by a 942cc V-Twin air-cooled, SOHC, fuel-injected engine that has been rated to return an output of 54 bhp at 5500rpm and 80 Nm of peak torque at 3000rpm. It is mated to a 5-speed gearbox that transfers power to the rear wheel via a belt drive just like traditional cruisers. This suggests it is an easy-going cruiser rather than a hustler.

The latest iteration Bolt R Spec has been priced at 10,45,000 Japanese Yen which could be around $8,499 in USA. Yamaha currently has no plans to ship this model to foreign markets, other than the USA.

Get Dealer and Availability Details at https://www.yamahamotorsports.com/sport-heritage/models/bolt-r-spec

Rare unused CZ Motorcycle at Mecum auction

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

This CZ Motorcycle Arrived in New York Decades Ago, Was Left Untouched

Say you read these two words: Ceska zbrojovka. For an English speaker, they are tongue-twisting, and they probably don’t mean that much either. Except, perhaps, if you’re into firearms. Or motocross machines. That’s because the Czech company by that name makes products for both these worlds.

As far as motorcycles go, people know the company best as CZ. Present mostly on the European market, the moniker reached American shores in the 1970s, forever changing how motocross racing was done. For instance, a racer by the name John DeSoto won the 1970 Elsinore GP on a CZ bike.

That is just one of CZ’s achievements; the nameplate holds six Motocross Grand Prix World Championship titles (consecutive ones, won between 1964 and 1969), but is also responsible for impressive wins in enduro.

Presently, finding a new CZ motorcycle is almost impossible, as they don’t make them anymore. One has to look long and hard just to come across such a two-wheeler with a few miles on it. But what if we told you the one you see before your eyes, although almost half a century old, is literally brand new?

Over the years, we’ve come across machines that could have easily been described as virtually new, but this one is literally so. As in, the thing has never ever been ridden, and it still comes in the original factory crate it was shipped to the U.S. in. It is the complete package, with all the packing plastic and oiled paper, and even an original spare parts list.

We stumbled upon this incredible piece of motoring history on the lot of motorcycles that are going under the hammer this week in Las Vegas. Sadly, we don’t know why this bike was never used for the purpose it was brought to the U.S.

Mecum is trying to sell the bike as is, saying it can be assembled and used for racing or kept as a museum piece. There’s no indication as to how much it is expected to fetch.

Harley-Davidson’s Icons Collection Electra Glide Revival

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

$29K Electra Glide Revival Is Harley-Davidson’s Icons Collection Treat for 2021

For a while now, we’ve gotten used to Harley-Davidson launching special editions of its models included in something called the Icons Collection. Each year, at most two models get included in the series with exclusive looks and equipment. For 2021, we have only one so far, and it’s the Electra Glide Revival.

For it to be included in the Icons Collection, the bike had to put on some special clothes, some that would make people reminisce about the 1969 Electra Glide, the “first Harley-Davidson motorcycle available with an accessory batwing fairing.” And for what it’s worth, it seems Harley nailed that look.

Sporting various colors on various pieces of hardware (Hi-Fi Blue and Black Denim on the fuel tank, Birch White here and there on the fenders and side panels), the motorcycle sure looks like it was transported through time from decades ago.

But it was not, of course, and proof of that are the mechanical bits that make this thing up. In the frame sits a modern Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin engine rated at 118 lb-ft (160 Nm) of torque, there’s the 6-speed Cruise Drive transmission to control it, and a wide range of acronyms depicting the bike’s safety systems: ABS, ELB, TCS, HHC, and so on.

Back to this thing being part of the Icons Collection, its belonging to this breed is highlighted by a unique serial number, a certificate of authenticity, a period-inspired tank medallion, and Electra Glide script on the front fender.

Harley says it will be making no more than 1,500 units of this Electra Glide Revival and will sell each starting this week from $29,199. As with any motorcycle in the Icons Series, the 1,500 units are all there is to this machine, as “production of that model will never be resumed or repeated.”

Husqvarna Electric Motorcycle E-Pilen Concept Revealed

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Husqvarna E-Pilen is expected to undergo production by late this year with a launch aimed at late 2021 or late 2022

With every other OEM venturing into electric mobility space, we often get to witness new designs and advent of some new technology even if it’s minuscule. The latest manufacturer is Husqvarna who plans to enter the emission-free auto world with the production version of E-Pilen Concept revealed recently.

Based on the unique and pioneering design of successful twins- Svartpilen and Vitpilen, E-Pilen Concept is the Swedish bikemaker’s first step into urban electric mobility. The company has ensured that the production-spec electric motorcycle will bear stark resemblances to the concept version showcased.

Modern Design
The progressive design philosophy of Svartpilen and Vitpilen has been carried forward to the electric bike which features some distinct styling elements such as an exposed trellis frame, wide handlebars, a compact fuel tank and a round headlamp.

While a light paint scheme has been carried forward from Vitpilen, the tank rack has been inspired by Svartpilen. Other design elements included are inverted forks, mono-shock at rear, and a gullwing swingarm.

Expected Powertrain Specs
It should be pointed out that the fuel tank houses the electric battery setup. The battery supplies energy to an electric motor with a rated capacity of 8kW (10.73 bhp). Although exact details of the powertrain are yet to be revealed, the company claims a modest range of 100km on a single charge. However, Husqvarna has assured that it will address the range anxiety issues of consumers by equipping E-Pilen with swappable batteries featuring a modular system.

Official statement from the company read as “It has always been the aim of Husqvarna Motorcycles to develop new products accessible to the broadest possible spectrum of riders. The E-mobility range will retain and continue the riding pleasure and dynamics refined through the long history and experience of the brand.”

More Details
More details regarding E-Pilen will be revealed as the electric motorcycle nears its final production-spec version. Husqvarna’s Austrian cousin KTM has already ventured into electric mobility space with 5 kW SX-E and 16 kW Freeride E. If E-Pilen indeed undergoes production it can also pave the path for electric KTM Dukes. Motorcycles of both brands are manufactured at Bajaj’s manufacturing facility in Chakan near Pune, Maharashtra.

In fact, Bajaj and KTM have been working together on a common electric platform that will underpin products ranging from 3kW to 10kW electric motors using a 48V electric system. Also, it was reported a couple of months back that KTM and Husqvarna are developing an all-new electric scooter as well which will be based on Bajaj Chetak Electric. We can expect E-Pilen to be launched late this year or early next year.

Husqvarna announces a new concept for Electric Motorcycle
by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Just as more car manufacturers are switching over to electric vehicles, well-known motorbike companies are also extending their line-up to include e-motorcycles. This year, we are definitely seeing a lot of innovative electric motorbikes being released, and that’s just the beginning.

Husqvarna is one of the brands that recently announced a new concept that’s on its way to being added to their successful motorcycle range. The E-Pilen model is actually intended to be the first of an entirely new series. The company has not yet revealed more details about what the E-mobility line will consist of, but it’s proof that they are serious about developing environmentally-friendly alternatives to classic models.

Fans were not given a lot of information about the upcoming E-Pilen model but, from what we can see so far, it resembles Husqvarna’s classic Vitpilen and Svartpilen in terms of design. The sharp silhouette, five-spoke wheels and retro-inspired round headlight are some of the elements that all of these bikes have in common. The company itself states that E-Pilen is meant to look as good as their most popular models, with the added benefits of electric mobility.

Aimed at “leisure riders”, the Husqvarna electric motorcycle would be ideal for regular commuting in urban environments. The company promises a 62-mile (100 km) range and an 8 kW power output for the electric model, that’s also equipped with a modular and swappable battery system. With E-Pilen currently under development, the motorcycle manufacturer is still considering various options as far as batteries, so we’ll know more about that in the future.

Since they are now appealing to a wider public who is interested in electric alternatives, Husqvarna also intends to extend their dealership network in urban and metropolitan areas.

According to their official statement,“It has always been the aim of Husqvarna Motorcycles to develop new products accessible to the broadest possible spectrum of riders. The E-mobility range will retain and continue the riding pleasure and dynamics refined through the long history and experience of the brand”.

E-Pilen will be launched in the near future, stay tuned for updates.

Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review

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by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review: The Brits take on entry-level adventure

Can Triumph’s cheaper, leaner Tiger stand out in a crowded motorcycle class?

Middleweight adventure bikes are among my favorite motorcycles. They’re good at everything — comfortable, fun to ride, capable off-road and surprisingly competent on a canyon road. The middleweight Triumph Tiger is a bike I know and love, having owned a 2015 800 XCX. Now there’s a new, lower-cost Tiger 850 Sport. Is the middleweight magic still there?

The heart of the bike is its three-cylinder engine. This engine offers the torque of a twin but the increased top end of a four-cylinder, and makes its own unique set of noises. The Tiger 850 Sport’s triple is an 888-cc unit that produces 84 horsepower at 8,500 rpm and 60 pound-feet of torque at 6,500 rpm.

The engine is basically the same unit you’ll find in the more expensive Tiger 900. In the 850 Sport, the triple is detuned to make it a little more new-rider-friendly and help differentiate it from its sibling. The engine is paired with a six-speed gearbox with a chain final drive and a cable-actuated clutch. The transmission is accurate and direct, but not as slick as I’ve come to expect from other modern Triumphs. The clutch is light, though, and easy to modulate.

Off-the-line performance is reasonable if not thrilling, and I doubt that most people will notice the 9-hp deficit between the 850 Sport and the more expensive 900. The transmission’s gearing is well-suited to the triple engine’s power band. While it no longer sounds like the whistly, warbly Triumph triples of old, I still consider it and its derivatives some of the best engines in the business thanks to their smoothness, tractability and overall personality.

The Tiger 850’s Marzocchi-sourced suspension is a little more basic than I’d like in terms of adjustability, but the stock settings are comfortable and should work just fine for most riders. The 45-millimeter front fork isn’t adjustable, and the rear monoshock is adjustable for preload only. The Tiger’s braking system comes from Brembo, with some nice four-piston Stylema calipers up front gripping 320-mm rotors. The rear brake is a single-piston affair gripping a 255-mm rotor. Anti-lock brakes are standard.

The Tiger 850 Sport is a heavily road-biased adventure bike, and the lack of off-road pretensions is a good thing. Even with its large-ish 19-inch front wheel, the Sport feels agile on the road, where other, more off-road focused Tigers with 21-inch wheels can feel a little sluggish when changing direction. The suspension is also well-calibrated for road use, with the ability to smooth out rough pavement but enough stiffness to keep the bike from feeling too floaty when pushed hard.

Modern Triumphs are generally pretty well equipped in the electronics department. The Tiger 850 is a little less feature-rich than other models, but it offers plenty for its target riders. In addition to the standard two-channel ABS, you also get basic traction control and user-selectable ride modes. Regrettably, one of the ways in which Triumph opted to lower costs was to ditch the inertial measurement unit that adds lean sensitivity to the bike’s electronics. If you want that, you have to step up to the 900.

The Tiger 850 Sport doesn’t suffer much from the lack of more advanced electronics, thanks to its well-engineered chassis and fantastic ergonomics. The Tiger does an excellent job of riding the fence between being a capable adventure bike and an approachable, easy-to-ride touring motorcycle. The bike’s 31.9-inch standover height is still going to be a little tall for some, but it’s in line with other bikes in the class. It’s also relatively light for the category at 428 pounds dry.

The 850 Sport goes up against bikes like the BMW F750 GS, the KTM 890 Adventure and the Moto Guzzi V85TT. Out of these, the Triumph holds its own in terms of power with all but the KTM. It also lacks some of the BMW’s optional technical goodies, like a dynamic suspension, but that’s reflected in the Tiger’s price.

The 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport retails for $11,995 before you add anything like accessories or luggage. For comparison, the higher-spec Tiger 900 will cost you $14,700, while the BMW F750 GS starts at $11,490. The KTM begins at $13,099 and the Moto Guzzi goes for $12,990.

In a segment with as much competition as the middleweight adventure bike category, would I buy the Tiger 850 Sport? Honestly, no. It’s not that it’s a bad bike, it’s just that the Tiger 850 doesn’t make a compelling argument for itself. With their added electronics and other niceties, the Tiger 900 or its European competitors are likely better buys.

New Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition

By General Posts

Released today, the new 2022 Triumph Motorcycles Scrambler 1200 is now more refined than ever. The Scrambler 1200 XC is built for sublime all-road fun and the range-topping Scrambler 1200 XE sets the benchmark for specification and off-road capability. Additionally, the Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition is limited to just 1,000 units and brings unique style and specifications to the ultimate Scrambler.

With all the Triumph Motorcycles Scrambler 1200 XC and XE’s category-dominating specification and style, incredible torque delivery and signature soundtrack, the new 2022 update delivers lower emissions whilst retaining all the thrilling performance, high power and torque that they are renowned for. Alongside the 2022 generation Scramblers comes a new beautiful and unique limited edition that celebrates the most famous movie star, stunt and motorcycle in history, with the Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition.

Thrilling Performance 

  • New engine update with lower emissions
  • New exhaust system update with improved heat distribution
  • High power 1200cc Bonneville twin engine with dedicated Scrambler tune
  • 81 LB-FT at a low 4,500rpm and 89HP at 7,250rpm

Dual-purpose Classic and Adventure cross-over

  • Commanding riding position with wide adjustable handlebars
  • Superior rider comfort
  • 21” front wheel, properly capable of going scrambling

Category-leading specification and state-of-the-art technology

  • Öhlins long travel fully adjustable RSUs and long travel Showa forks
  • Twin Brembo M50 radial monobloc callipers
  • Long-travel aluminum swingarm
  • Full-color TFT instruments with illuminated switches
  • Up to 6 riding modes, including Off-Road Pro (XE)
  • Optimized cornering ABS and optimized cornering traction control (XE)
  • All-LED lighting
  • Keyless ignition, single button cruise control and USB charging socket

21st century Scrambler-defining style and premium details

  • Iconic silhouette with sculpted bench seat and signature high level twin exhaust
  • Beautifully engineered side-laced tubeless wheels
  • Seamless fuel tank with brushed aluminum Monza cap
  • 70+ accessories, including new Dakar inspired fly screen

NEW Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition

  • Individually numbered limited edition with only 1,000 available worldwide
  • Unique Steve McQueen branding on the tank and handlebar clamp
  • Exclusive Competition Green custom paint scheme
  • New high specification with premium Scrambler accessories fitted as standard
  • Certificate of authenticity features the signatures of Triumph’s CEO,
    Nick Bloor and Chad McQueen, son of the legend himself, Steve McQueen.

First launched in 2018, the Triumph Scrambler 1200 has rapidly become a modern Triumph icon, setting a new benchmark in its category thanks to its class-leading riding capabilities both on-road and off-road, its state-of-the-art technology, outstanding specifications and extensive customization options.

Born from an unparalleled Triumph Scrambler bloodline, including the world’s first production scramblers, raced for fun and glory by legendary racers such as Bud Ekins and Steve McQueen, the new generation has featured in multiple extreme off-road competitions, including the Mexican 1000 and the Spanish Bassella race, repeatedly demonstrating their class leading capability.

A major highlight in the success of the new generation came with it featured in the 25th James Bond movie, No Time To Die, where it received high praise from Lee Morrison, James Bond Stunt Coordinator, who said “the whole stunt team realized very quickly that these were amazing bikes”.

ALL OF THE SCRAMBLER 1200’S CLASS LEADING CAPABILITY.

The 2022 Scrambler 1200 XE and XC represent the latest generation of one of the most capable and unique motorcycles on the market, and one of Triumph’s highest specification models ever. A genuine, class-defining cross over of two motorcycle worlds, with the iconic style and character of a Triumph Modern Classic, combined with the capability and specification of a full-on adventure motorcycle.

ENHANCED FOR 2021

Updated for 2022 along with all of Triumph’s iconic modern classic line-up, the new Scrambler 1200 XC and XE features an engine evolution that maintains all the Scrambler’s renowned power and torque delivery and delivers lower emissions. Additionally, the new generation update brings a revised exhaust system that delivers improved heat distribution.

FULL SPECIFICATIONS

Thrilling Performance
The Scrambler 1200 is powered by the latest evolution of Triumph’s characterful 1200cc high-power British twin. With a low inertia crank and a high compression cylinder head, plus a dedicated Scrambler tune, specifically developed to give the perfect balance of power and torque delivery for both road and off-road riding, the result is incredible torque from low down right through the rev range.

Peak torque hits 81 LB-FT at just 4,500rpm, while peak power of 89HP arrives at 7,250 rpm. The distinctive Scrambler sound, produced by the 1200cc 8-valve parallel twin engine, is delivered by the twin high level exhaust system with improved heat distribution.

Category-Dominating Specification and Capability

The 2022 Scrambler 1200 offers a category-dominating level of specification and equipment that gives these motorcycles such unique cross-over Classic and Adventure capability.

The class-leading long travel suspension delivers incredible off-road capability and ground clearance, with 250mm wheel travel front and rear, designed for riding across the toughest of terrains, as well as a supremely comfortable road riding experience. Both the Öhlins twin spring rear shocks and high specification upside down Showa front forks are fully adjustable for preload, compression and rebound damping, providing excellent comfort and control across a wide range of surfaces: from city streets right through to rocky off-road tracks.

Superior stopping-power is guaranteed by the category-leading Brembo M50 radial monobloc calipers, with twin 320mm floating discs on the front, and the Brembo caliper with single disc, on the back.  Such outstanding braking power is managed by the ABS that comes as standard on both models.

Enhancing the multi-purpose character of the Scrambler 1200, high specification wire spoked wheels with aluminum rims and a side-laced design, come as standard, allowing the use of tubeless tires. Dual purpose adventure-focused Metzeler Tourance tires are the standard fit, while for more extreme off-road use, Pirelli Scorpion Rally are recommended as an approved alternative option.

The 21” front wheel contributes to the Scrambler 1200’s incredible off-road capability and commanding riding position, and gives great visibility ahead, both when commuting and off road. This, combined with the wide adjustable handlebar position and the adjustable folding foot controls on the XE model, give the Scrambler 1200 its commanding poise and stance.

Class-Leading Technology

Packed with the state-of-the art technology and rider aids, the new Scrambler 1200 XC and XE really set the benchmark. Both models feature the full-color TFT instruments offering two different design themes, each with three display layout options, allowing the rider to alter the amount of information shown, according to their preferences. The TFT start-up sequence can also be personalized with the rider’s name. The multi-functional TFT display is controlled via the intuitive and easily accessible handlebar mounted 5-way joystick and other switches, all of which are backlit for easy navigation in the dark. High and low contrast displays ensure the TFTs are readable in all lighting conditions, while the adjustable screen angle suits every rider’s height thanks to the possibility of adjusting it.

The new Scrambler 1200 is also pre-enabled for the accessory-fit My Triumph connectivity system. This allows the rider to access phone calls, operate music, use turn-by-turn navigation and manage a Go-Pro through an intuitive handlebar control and TFT interface.

Triumph’s latest generation ride-by-wire ensures responsive and precise throttle control at all times, and enables the 6 riding modes – Road, Rain, Sport, Off-Road, Off-Road Pro (available on the XE only) and Rider-Configurable. The riding modes, which can be selected while on the move (with the exception of the Off-Road and Off-Road Pro modes) adjust throttle response, traction control and ABS settings for enhanced safety and optimum performance in all riding conditions.

The Scrambler 1200 XE also features optimized-cornering ABS and optimized-cornering traction control, both of which automatically adapt the level of intervention to maintain the optimum ride, at any lean angle. These features are managed by the Inertial Measurement Unit which measures the roll, pitch, yaw and acceleration rates of the bike in order to calculate the lean angle and optimize braking and traction control, accordingly, ensuring greater rider stability.

Benefitting from lower energy consumption, increased durability and greater visibility, the Scrambler 1200 mounts LED lights front and rear, and LED indicators (market specific). The headlight incorporates LED daytime running lights, which deliver better visibility and a distinctive front-end style (market specific).

Additional high specification rider-focused technology, standard on both of the 2022 Scrambler 1200 models, includes torque-assist clutch, cruise control, keyless ignition, under-seat USB charging socket and the internal wiring ready to plug in the accessory fit heated grips, which have 3 modes and are accessed through a really intuitive button built into the left grip.

Modern Custom Style with Category-Leading Finish and Detailing

Combining Triumph’s original Scrambler DNA, with beautifully crafted modern custom style, these bikes deliver all the hallmarks of a genuine scrambler. From the iconic silhouette with its high-level twin exhaust, to the commanding height and poise, the new 2022 Scrambler 1200 XC and XE have true scrambler-defining style.

Just like every Bonneville, the engine presents the distinctive machined engine fins and black engine covers with its classic maker’s-mark triangular Triumph engine badge. These models also have a category-leading standard of finish and detailing, with authentic features such as the seamless sculpted 4.2-gallon fuel tank, with brushed aluminum Monza fuel cap and brushed stainless strap. The custom-looking bench seat with stitched ribbing and Triumph branding completes the striking silhouette while delivering the optimal riding position and comfort when tackling any type of ride.

To complete the unmistakable scrambler style, the Scrambler 1200 features minimal aluminum mudguards, sculpted side panel with brushed aluminum Scrambler 1200 badge, aluminum bash plate and wide-set handlebars. And, the Scrambler 1200 XE gets even more, with hand guards, Brembo MCS lever, gold forks and the crafted aluminum long travel swingarm, which is longer on the XE, with a high specification shot blasted and anodized finish.

The new 2022 Scrambler 1200 XC and XE are available in three colors: Cobalt Blue with a Jet Black stripe, Matte Khaki Green with a Jet Black stripe or the single tone Sapphire Black option.

70+ Genuine Triumph Accessories

The Scrambler 1200 XC and XE have a range of over 70 Genuine Triumph Accessories. These have all been designed and tested alongside the bike to the same exacting standards and allow the rider to personalize their bike with enhanced style and practicality, increased comfort, luggage, protection, and security.

The comprehensive list of accessories ranges from a new Dakar-inspired fly screen to the durable and practical rugged pannier and tank bag, all adding greater touring capability. There is also a high-level front mudguard, handlebar brace and headlight grille, plus practical options including a center stand, fog lights and heated grips.

NEW SCRAMBLER 1200 STEVE MCQUEEN EDITION

Celebrating the most famous movie star, stunt and motorcycle in history, the new Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition brings all the new-generation 2022 Scrambler 1200 XE’s category-dominating specification, go-anywhere adventure-bike capability and state-of-the-art technology, and adds its own premium Steve McQueen paint scheme and extensive list of beautiful unique details. Fully equipped with a selection of premium Scrambler accessories, fitted as standard, the McQueen Edition is now officially the highest specification Scrambler 1200 ever.

Inspired by a genuine motorcycle legend

Inspired by the original competition-spec Triumph TR6, made famous by the legendary barbed wire jump in the iconic 1963 Second World War classic “The Great Escape”, the Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition has been developed in partnership with the McQueen family. Chosen to ride in the film by McQueen, over a period-correct German military motorcycle, the Triumph TR6 used in the jump was created by a British Triumph dealer and ISDT Gold Medal racer Ken Heanes, with an ISDT suspension set-up designed for robust stunt work.

Unique limited edition 

With just 1,000 Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition models available worldwide, each bike is individually numbered on the beautiful billet-machined handlebar clamp, which also features a laser etched Steve McQueen signature. For even greater exclusivity, each bike comes with a unique certificate of authenticity stating the bike’s VIN number, and carrying the signatures of Triumph’s CEO, Nick Bloor, and also Chad McQueen, son of the legend himself, Steve McQueen.

Exclusive details and finish

The unique paint scheme features a Competition Green tank with brushed foil knee pads, exquisite hand-painted gold lining, gold heritage Triumph logos, dedicated Steve McQueen tank graphic, brushed aluminum Monza cap and brushed stainless steel tank strap. The distinctive Steve McQueen Edition will also feature the aluminum high level front mudguard as standard, which, along with the rear mudguard, will also be painted in Competition Green.

In addition to the standard 1200 XE’s class leading specification, the Steve McQueen Edition comes fitted with engine protection dresser bars, which add another layer of ruggedness. Fabricated from stainless steel tubing, these have an electro-polished finish and offer additional protection to the clutch and alternator covers.

A laser cut and pressed aluminum radiator guard, with laser etched Triumph branding, also comes as standard, giving additional protection from loose stones while optimizing air flow.

The Steve McQueen Edition also features a premium brown bench seat, with stitched ribbing and Triumph branding, which further enhances the overall classic style and elegance.

Aside from movie stardom, Steve McQueen was also renowned for his Triumph Scrambler desert racing, which makes the Scrambler 1200 XE the perfect base for the exclusive edition, thanks to its class-defining capability both on and off-road. The new McQueen Edition shares all of the acclaimed XE specification and performance, including the 2022 engine and exhaust system updates. Being a genuine cross-over motorcycle, it has all the capability of a full-on adventure bike with the iconic style inherited from its legendary Scrambler lineage.

The new Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition is also pre-enabled for the accessory My Triumph Connectivity System. This allows the rider to access phone calls, operate music, use turn-by-turn navigation and manage a Go-Pro through the intuitive handlebar controls and TFT interface.

Pricing and Availability

Scrambler 1200 XC                $14,000 USD / $15,200 CAD             Available June, 2021

Scrambler 1200 XE                $15,400 USD / $16,300 CAD             Available June, 2021

Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition          $16,400 USD / $17,800 CAD             Available June 2021