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Reward Offered For Anyone Brave Enough To Remove Motorcycle Tire From Crocodile’s Neck

By | General Posts

(CNN) — A province in Indonesia is offering a reward to anyone brave enough to free an enormous wild crocodile from a motorcycle tire.

According to Indonesia’s state-run Antara news agency, the 13-foot (4-meter) crocodile has been carrying the tire since 2016, when it was first spotted roaming the Palu River in the province of Central Sulawesi.

The crocodile survived an earthquake and tsunami that struck the region in 2018 — but the tire hadn’t budged from its neck, according to the report.

Fearing the reptile may get strangled, Central Sulawesi’s Natural Resources Conservation Office (BKSDA) this week launched a contest to free it.

“A reward will be given to anyone who can release the hapless reptile,” Central Sulawesi BKSDA chief Hasmuni Hasmar said, according to the Antara report.

Hasmar did not disclose any more details of the reward.

According to Antara, there have been previous attempts to remove the tire. In 2018, conservationist and “animal whisperer” Muhammad Panji made an attempt, and later that year the conservation office tried to lure the animal with meat. Both attempts were unsuccessful.

Annual Colorado Motorcycle Expo

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The largest motorcycle event in the Rocky Mountain Region returns this weekend! Saturday and Sunday, head to the National Western Complex for the 42nd Annual Colorado Motorcycle Expo. Tickets start at $16.
coloradomotorcycleexpo.com

The Colorado Motorcycle Expo is the largest indoor motorcycle event in the rocky mountain region. Now in our 42nd year and under new ownership, we draw more than 20,000 people to the heart of Denver every year.

Hosted at the enormous National Western Complex, the Expo covers almost 300,000 square feet and is home to more than 700 vendors selling everything from motorcycle parts and gear to snacks for the road.

Spread across two days, the Colorado Motorcycle Expo offers entertainment for the whole family. From a custom and antique bike show, live music throughout the weekend, food & drink, and tons of things to do and see.

Visit https://www.coloradomotorcycleexpo.com

Motorcycle Touring the North Coast 500 in Scotland

By | General Posts

by Ryan Beitler from https://www.travelmag.co.uk/

With so many great options for motorcycle touring in the United Kingdom, there is likely no better choice than the Scottish Highlands. In the Highlands there is some of the most beautiful scenery and unspoiled wilderness in the county. There are a variety of ways to go through stunning Scottish nature. Going through the region on the North Coast 500 with a motorcycle will not only provide the healing solitude many riders yearn for, it offers things to do and see. The NC500 is the ultimate road for biking, and there are multiple ways to do it.

Guided or Solo

Depending on your preference, you can ride the NC500 through the Highlands with or without a guide. If you can handle the section of intense riding, you will be fine on your own. Furthermore it can provide a sense of serenity and peace when you are riding through the rolling hills of the Highlands. But if you are looking for companionship or someone to help you know where you are and where you are headed, getting a guide can be fulfilling. It all has to do with what you are looking for. Do you want a sense of adventure or to get where you’re going as safely and peacefully as possible? You have the option.

Scenery in the Highlands

It goes without saying that the scenery in the Scottish Highlands is gorgeous. Riding through the nature of this region is captivating and spiritual. It is arguably the main reasons to take a tour on the North Coast 500. Along this route you go through the Trossachs National Park, go into a Cairgnorms National Park, and pass by Lake Lomomd. Furthermore, there is the town of Loch Ness, home of the Loch Ness monster also called Nessie. You will travel through the Caledonian Canal to Fort William, which is the adventure capital of the United Kingdom. You will also have the chance to visit some of the tranquil and beautiful islands around here, the Inner and Outer Hebrides, and the Isle of Skye.

Stuff to Do

In addition to some spectacular vistas, there are some great things to do and see on your route. There is the Smoo cave, which is a dramatic sea cave that boasts on the largest entrances to any sea cave in the UK. You can also visit the Eilean Donan Castle. Near Cairgnorms there are the Balmoral Castle and famous whiskey distilleries. If you are interested in prehistoric history, the Camster Ciarns are a burial site on the coast that was originally built five thousand years ago.

Things you Should Know

While a lot of visitors will come to ride through the Highlands in the summer, it can get pretty busy during these peak months. The shoulder seasons are better for both the road and the weather. The North Coast 500 is really great in either direction but it is arguably a more pleasant ride to go counter-clockwise. Riding this way takes you along the coast for the duration, it also puts some of the tough riding in the beginning so you can enjoy leisurely during the last days of your trip. The stretch over the Pass of the Cattle that goes into Applecross is one of the most challenging sections of the NC50, which is known for adverse conditions.

If you are willing to rough it a bit here and there, you can save some money on your trip through the Highlands. According to MoneyPug, a site that is used in the UK to find cheap holidays, there are hostels in the region and a free campsite by the YHA in Torridon. There are fuel pumps open for 24 hours along the route. While some people do the NC500 in just three days, it can be better to take more time and enjoy the scenery and the sites.

It doesn’t matter what you’re looking for in a ride, you can find it in the Scottish Highlands along the North Coast 500. It is not surprising that this route is known as one of the best for bikers around the world. It is rugged, full of things to do, people to meet, and, above all else, it is gorgeous.

Montreal woman leaves her job, hits the road for solo motorcycle trip across Canada

By | General Posts

Wendy McGean fulfilled her dream — of driving cross-country on a motorcycle — at 55 years old

Suddenly, in her late forties, Wendy McGean started having an unexpected reaction every time she’d spot a motorcycle on the road.

“My head would just pivot and I’d think: ‘I really want to do that!” she told CBC Montreal’s Daybreak.

At the time, she thought it was an odd feeling for a married mother of two teenage daughters with a white collar job.

“It was a very traditional kind of life,” she said.

Before she knew it, McGean was leaving all that behind — her home, her job, even her marriage.

“Some people thought I’d absolutely lost my mind,” McGean said. “I just completely turned my life upside down.”

Just one kick at the can

McGean started to chase her dream of riding a motorcycle at 51 years old, signing herself up for circuit training. She realized that she didn’t feel comfortable on only two wheels and bumped up to a three-wheeled bike.

She said it was “love at first sight,” and suddenly McGean was buying a bike of her own.

“I think it’s the first thing in my life I found that I thought, ‘this is mine,'” she said. “It represents complete and utter freedom.”

Not long after McGean got a taste of that freedom, she suffered a major loss. Her father died.

“[It] made me realize that if there’s something that I want to do in my life, then I better get at it,” she said. “So I made the decision to leave my marriage.”

After 23 years of married life, McGean said she started to feel like a square peg and her life was a round hole. Something just didn’t fit anymore.

“I was lucky enough to have somebody that understood that I needed to explore that,” she said.

After living on her own for a while, McGean saw that her workplace was offering an early retirement package that she qualified for. She took it, moved out of her apartment and put everything she owned in storage, except for a one-person tent.

“I got on my bike and headed north without any reservations or anything,” she said.

Forging connections, old and new

With no plans and no commitments, McGean spent the next five weeks riding west to Tofino, B.C. and back, stopping in different towns and meeting new people.

One man she met at a gas station was intrigued by her motorcycle and struck up a conversation about his own cross-country ride on a bike. Before pulling out of the station, he gave her a hug.

“Stopping and having conversations with people I met along the way was probably the best part of the whole trip,” she said.

McGean also took the opportunity to reconnect with people she hadn’t seen in years — she spent a night with a friend in Ontario she hadn’t seen since high school, and also stopped to visit some cousins in Manitoba.

McGean’s cross-country treks are over, for now, but she said she’s grateful for the experience.

“At some point along the way, I finally realized that I had to live my life for me,” she said. “I had to do things that made me happy.”

She’s not sure what lies ahead for her, but McGean is now looking for a job doing something she loves in the Montreal area because she wants to be near her daughters, who are now in their 20s.

Looking back, she said her adventures really helped her come into her own.

“I’m comfortable in my own skin now. Probably for the first time in my life.”

Denver Motorcycle Show reinforces industry’s new focus

By | General Posts

The Progressive International Motorcycle Show rolled through Denver last weekend, and if memory serves, it was the first appearance in a half-decade or so.

Colorado once had a major part in non-Harley-centric motorcycle drama. The Copper Mountain Cycle Jam was a giant event that featured the AMA Supermoto circuit amongst the high Rockies and brought thousands from out-of-state. Pikes Peak International Raceway was home to an AMA SuperBike round that featured some great racing on the unconventional race course. There was even of a round national vintage racing with AHRMA at Pueblo.

Those days, and that motorcycle industry is gone, casualties of the Great Recession and a millennial generation hooked on phones, not speed and adventure.

So when the IMS came to town, it was a solid look at how the industry is trying to recast itself.

The first clear observation was the number of women. Women have always been the great, untapped market. And between gear, smaller bikes and dropping some of the macho facade, the industry seems to be getting it. The attendees certainly did.

The second was the focus on new riders. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation demo area and multi-brand new rider section took up a third of the floor. You can’t get people hooked on riding if you don’t get them on a bike first. And the industry is finally putting the full-court press on making that happen with young, old, men and women all hopping on the wide range of demo alternatives. And actually riding, on an indoor course set-up just to train new riders.

The motorcycle industry is not alone in the current active sports paradox. The technology in current bikes makes them safer, more accessible and more exciting than ever. Bikes are ever more sophisticated, with electronics and computing power surpassing desktop computers of a generation ago. With the sophistication has come costs that put many potential riders in a gig economy out of the market when bound by student loan debt, sky high rents and $150/month phone bills.

But if the Denver show is any indication, the industry is listening and trying.

Win Tickets to the Super Fun “One Motorcycle Show”!

By | General Posts

by Wm. Steven Humphrey from https://www.portlandmercury.com/

If you love motorcycles, then the annual One Motorcycle Show is the cultural event of the season! Experience hundreds of the hottest rare, custom-built motorcycles designed by master crafters from across America (and of course, here in the PNW). Oh, but that’s not all! Along with delicious brews, coffee, food, live bands (including Hot Snakes, Thunderpussy, Red Fang, and more), and loads of motorcycle inspired art, this beloved show has also moved to Veterans Memorial Coliseum—which means what? That the famous dirt track races which were previously held in Salem will now join the rest of the show under one huge roof! Oh dear god… can you stand that much motorcycle fun?

This awesome show goes down Fri Feb 7-Sun Feb 9, with indoor dirt track racing on Sat Feb 8, all at Veterans Memorial Coliseum. For times and tickets, hit up the website. OR if you’re feeling lucky enter to WIN TWO FREE WEEKEND PASSES to the show with the widget thingy below—but HURRY. Deadline for entry is February 3 at noon!

Enter to win TWO weekend passes to The One Moto Show!

https://www.the1moto.com/

10,000 beers • 5,000 high-fives • 200+ bikes • 5 bands • 70 vendors • 20 partners

15 race classes • All under ONE roof!

The One Motorcycle Show is an inclusive showcase crafted to celebrate weird, rare, custom, classic and unconventional bikes in a way that everyone can enjoy, whether they ride or not. Started with the impulsive idea to bring together a small community of enthusiasts in underground venues of Portland, the One Show has expanded to an improbably massive event that is emulated around the country and admired around the globe.

The One Motorcycle Show

February 7th 8th 9th 2020

Plant City F.A.I.T.H. Riders: Motorcycle Ministry

By | General Posts

The phrase ‘where the rubber meets the road’ is fitting when used to describe the F.A.I.T.H. Riders motorcycle ministry. Employing motorcycles as a tool and transportation, the F.A.I.T.H. Riders ministry is passionate about going into the world and sharing the good news of Jesus Christ.

Established in 2002 by the late Buddy Newsome, F.A.I.T.H. Riders began as a ministry of Lakeland’s Church at the Mall. Since then, the ministry has spread across the nation encompassing 365 chapters. The Plant City chapter is one of 54 chapters located in Florida and based out of the First Baptist Church of Plant City.

Sam DeMicco and her husband, Roy, are members of the Plant City chapter and work on its assessment team. The assessment team travels around Florida, visiting inactive chapters and educating churches about the ministry.

“Our goal is to show that we are more than a riding club,” explained DeMicco. “We don’t require anybody to ride a motorcycle. We want people who desire to spread the gospel.”

While each F.A.I.T.H. Riders chapter may operate slightly different, it must be a ministry of a local Southern Baptist church and include worship, evangelism, discipleship, fellowship and ministry. Additionally, chapters are encouraged to support other ministries within the church and its surrounding community.

“The motorcycle is a tool, and it helps us go into places where there’s a lot of unchurched people,” explained DeMicco. “Your average biker is not your average churchgoer.”

Every year, representatives from F.A.I.T.H. Riders set up a tent at Daytona’s Bike Week, where they look for opportunities to reach others for Christ. To draw people to their tent, they raffle off a brand-new motorcycle, and the only way to enter is by listening to a three-minute testimony from one of the F.A.I.T.H. Riders.

She continued, “There are a lot of people who are interested in motorcycles. Getting gas is where I have most of my conversations. People say, ‘nice motorcycle,’ and it opens that door for a conversation, and then I can talk to people about Jesus.”

The F.A.I.T.H. acronym stands for Forgiveness, Available, Impossible, Turn and Heaven. For further description, please visit www.faithriders.com, where you can also donate online to the mission.

The Plant City chapter is based out of First Baptist Church of Plant City, located at 3309 James L. Redman Pkwy. For more information on where it gathers and upcoming events, please visit https://plantcityfaithriders.com or contact its director, Roger Blethen, at 924-9035.

Motorcycle racing in Asia is growing at unrivaled pace

By | General Posts

by Renato Marques from https://macaudailytimes.com.mo

The first-ever person of Portuguese nationality to hold the position, Jorge Viegas has served as president of the global governing and sanctioning body of motorcycle racing, the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM), for just over a year now.

In an exclusive interview with the Times last week, Viegas shared his opinions on the development of the sport in Asia and worldwide, speaking also about the ambitions of his presidency. He also offered some advice to Macau motorcycling event organizers, while stressing again that his organization has no jurisdiction over the annual event, part of the Macau Grand Prix.

After one year at the helm of the FIM, Viegas remarked on his success in making the organization more democratic and more transparent. He also claimed victory in his goal to give more importance to the constituent FIM committees, which he said had been “totally left out of decisions” in the past.

“I am very pleased that I [accomplished] a small ‘revolution’ at the FIM at the internal level,” he said. “That was one of my goals and it was achieved.”

Opening the FIM to the world had debunked the impression that the FIM was just “a bunch of old guys that liked to travel.”
“I have been opening the doors of the FIM to the outside and have started to collaborate a lot more with the promoters. Next month, we will, for the first time, host a plenary meeting with all the committees with the presence of journalists. This has never happened before. I want to show what the FIM does.”

“One of the first measures I took was to hold a press conference that took place at Losail during Qatar GP last year, in which I presented everyone from the FIM side that works in a Grand Prix, asking them to explain who they are and what their job duties are.”
“Without going into too much detail, I would say that I managed to bring the FIM closer to the national federations,” said Viegas.
Coming up, more reform is expected, especially in the categories of “Superbikes” and “Endurance”. The president promised that new measures to improve these categories will be announced soon, even as early as this year.

His ultimate goal remains greater engagement of the youth in motorcycle racing, all while ensuring the safety of the sport. Building on his mandate, Viegas reiterated that “every youngster, independent of gender and financial capacity, if they have the talent, passion, and motivation, [ought to be able to] compete in motorcycle racing.” At the same time, the sport must be “as safe as possible,” because only in this way can we “convince parents to let the youth participate in the sport.”

‘Unrivaled’ growth in Asia

For Viegas, “the development of motorcycling in Asia is unrivaled worldwide.”

The Asian continent is the fastest-growing region of the world when it comes to motorcycle racing, and yet its popularity is still far from peaking, he said. The FIM president recalled how the organization began with 16 national and regional federations across Asia. Today, that number has almost doubled, with 28 already accounted for and another three joining the FIM soon.

This trend is perhaps unsurprising given that, in the words of Viegas, “Asia is the most popular continent for motorcycles and where the most are circulating in the streets.”

The president is also impressed with how upbeat everyone in Asia is about the sport.

Addressing the inclusion of a new race in the MotoGP to be held on the island of Lombok, Indonesia in March 2021, Viegas remarked, “the works to build this circuit have just started and [the promoters] have already sold about 30,000 seats for the event.”
The sport is also popular elsewhere in Asia, where circuit racing championships are well-entrenched, according to the FIM president.
However, the continent suffers from a major drawback: its size. As a large and diverse continent, Asia presents a challenge in high traveling costs.

“For example, a rider going racing from China to Japan faces very high expenses,” offered Viegas, referring to transportation and logistics costs. For this reason, FIM tries to financially support the Asian Federation, so that it is possible to maintain competitive championships.

Return to China only a ‘matter of time’

Notably absent from the countries hosting major motorcycle racing events is China, leading some to speculate about disagreement between the organizers and the Chinese government. Viegas was quick to dismiss the idea of any ill feeling between the FIM, the promoters and the Chinese government.

“There is no problem with China,” he told the Times. “I believe that if they want to host an event, they can do it.”

Although there is currently no circuit in China homologated to the standards of hosting any major competitions, “if they want to, they can do that easily,” said Viegas. “It is just a matter of will and making a few works on the [existing] circuits or even building a new one.”

“I was with the Chinese authorities a few months ago and they told me that they wanted to have MotoGP back in China,” he continued. This comes as China has been pursuing other kinds of motorcycle racing categories, such as Motocross. The debut of the FIM Motocross World Championship took place in Shanghai last year, and is set to return this year.

But a return of the MotoGP is not likely within the next few years, according to the FIM president.

“We have a lot more demand than we can satisfy,” explained Viegas. “There are a lot of countries wanting to host MotoGP. This year we already expanded the championship to 20 races, and in upcoming years we can likely grow to [a maximum of] 22, which is enormous.”

Macau Grand Prix needs to review safety

Although the FIM has no jurisdiction over the motorcycle race held during the Macau Grand Prix event, the Times solicited Viegas’s views and insights on the race.

The FIM veteran, who served a number of roles at the organization prior to becoming its president, immediately suggested two logistical improvements that local organizers could adopt.

“There is one thing that the organizers can do to improve the race, which is not running motorcycle events after car events,” he said, highlighting that after a series of car races, track surface conditions may not be ideal. He also mentioned that the light and visibility conditions late in the afternoon can also be challenging for racers and present added logistical complications with race restarts.

“I think this is the minimum that organizers could do because this will improve a lot of the conditions,” said Viegas.

On a more positive note, the FIM president remarked on the “good choices” made by local organizers in “bringing in riders with a lot of experience and progressively investing in the active safety systems.”

“In the future, we hope the riders will all wear racing suits with an airbag system incorporated as well as FIM homologated helmets,” said Viegas, adding that these additional safety features have been designed to minimize the risk to racers.

For the president of FIM, the only safety issue with the Guia Circuit is the lack of run-off areas.

“The problem of Macau [street circuit] is very simple; there are no run-off areas, that’s all. There are no other problems. This is a circuit designed to host car races, the motorcycles are a complementary race that the spectators enjoy. I just think we should do all that is possible to increase the safety of the event,” he said.

A solution commonly used by the FIM on permanent racing circuits that do not possess enough run-off space is so-called “air fences”- soft-wall safety barriers, which are inflated to cushion impact from riders on otherwise rigid structures.

“When we cannot have run-off areas with the length we need, the circuit must install an air fence and we have seen riders reaching them even in areas with a lot of space,” he explained.

“Here in Macau, it would be needed obviously but again, we are not the entity that controls the safety conditions in Macau. What I wish is that there will be no more serious incidents here.”

Several recent incidents in the motorcycle racing component of the Macau Grand Prix have raised safety concerns once again among race organizers and the general population of the city. In 2017, motorcyclist Daniel Hegarty died in a crash at the Fisherman’s Bend after losing control of his bike. A major crash last year left three riders hospitalized and saw the race red flagged.

“We understand that there are riders specialized in this type of race [road racing] and they are highly experienced as well as highly aware of the risks they are taking. But what I can say is that it’s not this kind of race that the FIM encourages,” Viegas said. “This is not a circuit homologated by the FIM and it can never be, because it cannot fully meet optimal safety conditions.”

Nevertheless, the official recognizes that events like the Macau Grand Prix and the Isle of Manx TT have a long tradition with some races going back to over a century.

“It’s not under FIM competences to say anything against them,” he said. “As for the [Macau] race, it’s great entertainment and the people love it and the riders love it too.”

The global energy problem

Globally, another major challenge is the need to follow the world trend in “energy transition,” according to Viegas, which will necessitate swapping petrol-powered engines to electricity-powered motors.

“This is something that concerns us and that we are working on together with the promoters and manufacturers,” Viegas said, explaining that on motorcycles this swap will be more difficult than on cars as the current batteries are very heavy and very big, making the batteries appropriate for a racing motorcycle not capable of managing great distances.

For the time being, the Moto-E category part of the complementary program of MotoGP in some European circuits only can feature six-lap racing events.

“But as we know, this technology is developing very fast. When the batteries can be of a longer range and become lighter, I am sure we will see some great leaps forward.”