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First ever Dubai Motorcycle Film Festival kicks off with a roar

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Scene from “Fast Eddie” motorcycle film

from https://www.euronews.com

The inaugural Dubai Motorcycle Film Festival has taken place in the UAE. The three-day event featured bike builds, short character-driven films to full-length documentaries that reveal the spirit and soul of the motorcycling community.

It is the brainchild of Festival Director, Ian Carless, who told Euronews that it was a challenging process choosing the films, “There’s a lot of content out there, as you can imagine, particularly for motorcycles. So choosing the films… the hardest part of that was actually which ones to leave out.”

Over 30 films were screened including Song of Sosa from Director, Cam Elkins, who discussed the importance of these platforms.

“These kinds of festivals just really give filmmakers, particularly motorcycle filmmakers, the opportunity to tell a whole diverse range of stories from different cultures and backgrounds”, he said.

Getting the event off the ground was also a rewarding challenge. Rhett Maxwell the General Manager of Honda UAE said that he was thrilled to be part “of the beginnings” of what he expects to be a massive event in the future. “Stuff in Dubai starts small, but it never stays small”, he added.

Highlights of the film festival included screenings of ‘Fast Eddie’, the story of a World War II veteran who still rides every day, and ‘Rebel Riders’, a film showcasing extreme Vespa Scooter subculture in Indonesia.

Local filmmaker Michael Vosloo showcased ‘WhyWeRide’ – an uplifting short about women riders in the desert.

“I think for many people that haven’t ridden and mainly also for females, if they think that biking is not for them, this is the film to watch. It’s very short, quick to the point. It’s a lot of fun” he told Euronews.

The second edition of the festival hopes to build on this years’ success and has already been scheduled for February 2022.

Crushing the Record for the World’s Longest Motorcycle the American Way

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by Cristina Mircea from https://www.autoevolution.com

The title for the longest motorcycle in the world belongs to an Indian who built one that measures 86 ft and 3 in (26.29m). Bharat Sinh Parmar holds the Guinness World Record since 2014. That didn’t sit well with the guys from Bikes and Beards, who decided to bring that record to the United States, using a vintage Japanese bike.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with it, Bikes and Beards is the YouTube channel of SRK Cycles, a bike dealer based in Pennsylvania. This isn’t their first unusual vlog, as the whole purpose of the channel is to redefine the way you use a motorcycle and push the boundaries of human creativity. In case you haven’t slept well at night wondering if you can run a motorcycle underwater for 10 minutes, do browse their channel and you’ll find out.

The common approach for others who’ve tried to build a long motorcycle has been to place the engine and the drive train on the front, then add a long swingarm and then the wheel in the back. But there’s a simpler way to do things, which is to build two square tubes at both ends of the bike and have them welded on the motorcycle. The long frame would then get connected to those tubes.

The guys’ bike, a 1980 Honda CB750 Custom motorcycle, ended up measuring 108 ft, which was a success, not to mention the fact that everything was accomplished within one week.

In order to break the record, the motorcycle had to prove it can actually handle itself on the road, taking turns and everything. Bharat Sinh Parmar had to ride his for 308 ft (93.8 m) without putting his feet down, to break the previous record. But the Bikes and Beards guys took their stretched bike for a 1,058 ft (322 m) ride, crushing the Indian’s record.

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Piaggio, KTM, Honda and Yamaha set up swappable batteries consortium

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by Reuters from https://www.investing.com

MILAN (Reuters) – Italian scooter maker Piaggio said on Monday it had set up a consortium with Honda Motor Co., KTM AG and Yamaha Motor Co. to encourage the use of swappable batteries for electric motorcycles and light electric vehicles.

The Swappable Batteries Motorcycle Consortium (SBMC) aims to broaden the use of light electric vehicles, such as scooters, mopeds and motorcycles, and support a more sustainable management of their batteries, a joint statement said.

It will focus on issues such as battery life, recharging times, infrastructure and costs and will work on defining international standard technical specifications for swappable batteries.

The companies in the consortium said they welcomed others joining them to extend standards to as many companies as possible.

“Urban mobility is going through a delicate transition moment towards electrification. Thanks to this consortium, motorbikes will keep their key role,” Piaggio Chief of Strategy and Product Michele Colaninno said.

Honda’s Motorcycle Operations Chief Officer Yoshishige Nomura said the consortium’s objectives aimed to make electric motorbikes more convenient for clients, as their “use on large scale can substantially contribute to the creation of a more sustainable society”.

Piaggio Group owns iconic two-wheeler brands such as Vespa, Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, among others.

Eight of the Fastest Street-Legal Motorcycles You Can Buy in America

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by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

It begins with the story of the legendary Suzuki Hayabusa. When that beast launched back in 1999, it triggered a hurricane of anxiety among various manufacturers – and it all came down to the top speed of the bike – a stunning 194 mph.

The Hayabusa represented a quantum leap in speed and made it the fastest motorcycle you could buy and ride on the streets. In fact, it took the title away from the already insanely fast Honda CBR1100XX Super Blackbird, and it did it by a startling 14 mph.

In answer, Kawasaki announced the creation of the Ninja ZX-12R, and it promised a top speed of more than 200 blistering miles per hour. That announcement led regulators to consider tamping down the lust for speed among manufacturers, and it also led to what’s come to be known as The Gentleman’s Agreement among the top motorcycle manufacturers across the globe.

As the story goes, the “agreement” called on manufacturers to set the upper limit on motorcycle speed at 200 mph. Since then, that agreement has been violated to varying degrees, and here are some of the motorcycles that flirt with – and exceed – the barrier posited by The Gentlemen’s Agreement.

The Yamaha YZF-R1M, which purports to achieve a top end of 185.7 mph, has itself become legendary for its on and off-track precision and power. The R1 line and the street legal R1 models achieve their punch following a power-and-less-bulk formula.

Offering lightweight carbon-fiber construction and powered by an explosive 998cc, liquid-cooled “cross-plane” inline-four, the R1 creates 200 hp and offers 89.2 lb-ft torque. When that kind of juice moves through its 6-Speed manual, the R1M does 0-60 mph in a snot-loosening 2.3 seconds. One of these beasts will set you back just over $26,000 USD.

Next up on this rogues gallery is the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. This KTM is a naked hypersport bit of lunacy that packs a 1301 cc, 75-degree V-twin motor into a novel frame. The 1290 Super Duke R wacks the limits of physics to the tune of 180 hp and cranks out 103 lb-ft of torque.

At a svelte 462 lbs. dry weight., the Super Duke R covers 0-60 mph in just 2.6 seconds and is limited to 186 mph. If you must have one, this KTM will set you back right around $18,000 USD.

The Hayabusa is back, and the 3rd Generation variant uses the same 1340cc inline-four motor to produce a healthy 188 hp and 110 ft-lbs of torque and covers 0-60 mph in a serviceable 3.2 seconds.

While it’s now restricted to 186 mph top speed, it does its progenitors proud. It will be priced at just north of $22,000 USD.

The BMW S1000RR represented a huge technological leap for the time, and when it launched in 2009, it was packed to the brim with electronics and rider-assist features unheard of even for the sophisticated ‘ultra bikes’ of the time.

The latest iteration, the 2021 BMW S1000RR is powered by a water/oil-cooled inline-4 motor that generates a stunning 205 hp and 83 lb-ft of torque.

In ‘Race Pro Mode’ it covers 0-60 mph in 3.1 seconds and is capable of reaching a top speed of 192 mph. All that performance does not come cheap and the sticker price is expected to come in around $30,000.

An Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory is a sublime example of Italian design and engineering and an amazing achievement when you consider the fact that the has only been in the game since the end of the Second World War. Aprilia is dedicated to motorcycle sports and they use the competitive anvil to forge their lightning-fast and supple machines.

The RSV4 1100 Factory is powered by a 1099cc V4 engine which turns out 217 hp and 90 lb-ft of torque. And perhaps most critically, it weighs just 390 lbs and that finely-balanced power-to-weight ratio means it can do 0-60 mph in just 2.9 seconds and achieve a reported top speed of 198.8 mph. The Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory sports an MSRP of $25,999.

Known for the subtlety and innovative character of their designs, Ducati remains iconic for their blend of finish, style and pure power. The Panigale V4R combines carbon fiber and their signature desmodromic engine, Desmosedici Stradale R 998 cc Inline-4, produces 221hp straight out of the factory and you can ramp that power up to 234 hp with the addition of an Akrapovic full-racing exhaust.

The Desmosedici Stradale motor puts out 92 lb-ft of torque and travels from 0-60 mph in 3.2 seconds before ultimately achieving a top speed of 199 mph. You can be the proud owner of a 2021 Ducati Panigale V4R for just under $23,000.

As we near the top of this list, we find a pair of Kawasakis perched near the pinnacle. The ZH2 and the Ninja H2 are both said to be capable of 200+ mph, and these novel supercharger-boosted motorcycles feature 998cc inline-4 motors that crank out 200 hp and 101 lb-ft of torque.

The ZH2 with the ability to cover 0-60 mph in under 3 seconds and reach a top speed of more than 200 mph also represents a devil’s bargain of sorts. For 2021, Kawasaki ZH2 is priced at just over $17,500.

The lunatic Kawasaki Ninja H2R – with a stated top speed of 248 mph, is a track-only machine and therefore not allowed on our list. The H2R does hold the record holder for top end speed as it reached a snot-loosening 250 mph in just 26 seconds. For 2021, the Kawasaki Ninja H2 is priced at $29,500.

But the bike at the top of the list of mad-dog bikes you can ride on the street belongs to the Lightning LS-218.

Electric motorcycles are clearly the future, and the neck snapping torque offered up by an electric motor is surely attractive to wild fools in search of speed at all costs.

The Lightning LS-218 is powered by a 380V electric powerplant coupled to any of three battery packs: 12, 15, or 20 kWh. At its top tuning settings, this nearly silent monster churns out 200 hp and 168 lb-ft of torque and can reach a top speed of 218 mph.

Coupled with a demented 0-60 mph time of just 2.2 seconds, it takes the top slot when it comes to streetworthy guts. The 2021 Lightning LS-218 comes in at around $39,000 USD out the door.

Of course, most of these figures are reported by the manufacturers and results may vary according to conditions and tuning…

New Zealand Hoar Run 2021

By General Posts

by Graeme Lowen

My fears of there being ice over the pass were unfounded and the road was dry. It was the stop at Tarras that provide us with chilly clues. I got talking to a lady who drove from Tekapo in the morning. She told us that the first club group ran into dense hoar frost and thick fog all the way from Tekapo to the Ohau turnoff. The guys who left 20 minutes later missed most of it.

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Custom Motorcycle turned into Production Model by Honda

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by Sebastian Toma from https://www.autoevolution.com

2021 Honda CB1000R 5Four Turns Custom Bike Into Production Reality.

Honda has opened the order books for the CB1000R 5Four, a performance-focused café racer bike inspired by the CB1000RS 5Four built by Guy Willison. The Japanese company teamed up with the builder for this limited-edition model, and it blends café racer styling with a factory-backed warranty.

Honda’s flagship naked motorcycle received an update for the 2021 model year, and that was selected as the base for the CB1000R 5Four. Work started with the front, which received a cowl for the front headlight. The handlebar received a set of LSL dog-leg brake and clutch levers, as well as a set of mirrors.

The gas tank has a hand-painted Honda logo, and the seat is hand-stitched in a diamond pattern, while the rear of the seat has the 5Four logo laser etched on it. The tail of this bike is also custom, as it has a slimmer LED rear light, while the license plate mount was moved up to allow a better view of the rear wheel.

Customers will also get a titanium Growler-X exhaust from Racefit, which is supposed to only be used on the track. It comes with laser-etched 5Four and Racefit logos. It sounds nice, as you can observe in the video embedded below.

Naturally, the bike had to get custom paintwork. In this case, we are writing about a candy red main color, along with blue and pearl white accents. The three colors are an inspiration from Honda’s racing efforts. Customers will also be able to order Guy Willison’s signature painted on the rear fender, right next to the seat.

Each bike will get a signed certificate of authenticity. Honda will only sell this bike through its dealer network in the UK. However, most of the components will have a part number on them, so a few e-mails to Honda dealers could help you order just enough parts to turn your CB1000R into a replica of this bike, or just a custom version to better suit your preference.

The 2021 Honda CB1000R 5Four is priced at GBP 16,954 ($23,612), which is not that much for a limited-edition custom motorcycle. Even if all examples will have the same features, they will still be numbered and come with a certificate of authenticity, so the resale value should exceed that of the base model, the 2021 CB1000R, as the years go by.

Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Races its Superbike Counterpart

By General Posts

by Sebastian Toma from https://www.autoevolution.com

Honda has pitted the new CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP against its racing version on a track to prove how fast it can be in the right hands. With slick tires, the sport bike is as close to a street-legal MotoGP racer as possible.

The resemblance between the two is normal, as British Superbike rules mandate that the race bike must be developed from the homologated production motorcycle. Therefore, the chassis and the engine are identical, but the race bike has a few tweaks within regulations to allow it to be even faster.

According to the rulebook, the Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP’s racing version must have a spec ECU, which allows it to rev even higher than its street-legal brother. The gearing can also be changed according to various necessities, depending on the track and rider preference, along with a minimum weight of 168 kg (370.37 lbs.).

To prove just how fast the street-legal version of this bike can be, Honda Racing UK British Super Bike racer Glen Irwin took both bikes on the same day at Oulton Park International Circuit. We are talking about a 2.69-mile (4.33 km) track in the UK and identical riding conditions. Honda even fitted both bikes with the Pirelli Diablo Racing slicks (SC0 compound) to allow a direct comparison between the two bikes.

The street bike was still fitted with the stock mirrors, standard toolkit, and everything else one gets when buying a new Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP. The slick tires were the only change from the stock condition, and the team did not alter any settings on the bike.

Glenn Irwin rode each bike for six laps, and he managed to set a time of 1’39.054 on the production CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP, which is just 2.872 seconds more than what he did with his British Superbike Fireblade.

Trap speed was 210.5 km/h (130 mph) on the street-spec bike, which is just 6.8 km/h (4.2 mph) slower than the race model, which goes to show how far have sport bikes gone in past years. The only thing left is for their riders to improve their skills on the track before thinking about changing anything on a stock super sport motorcycle.

Dream E-Type: Early days of the Honda 4-Stroke

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from https://www.thesundaily.my

Mr Honda’s disdain for two-stroke engines fuelled the relentless pursuit of perfection for his little four-strokers.

It was March 1951 when Soichiro Honda summoned engineer Kiyoshi Kawashima from Hamamatsu.

“‘Kawashima, would you mind coming over for a moment?’ It was the beginning of a two-month stint in the capital as I worked on the design of the E-Type 4-stroke engine in a corner of the Tokyo Plant,” recalls Kawashima. “When the plans were at last ready the Old Man dashed in to see it, bringing Fujisawa, with him.” (Takeo Fujisawa was Honda Motor Co Ltd’s co-founder.)

Kawashima can remember clearly that day in May 1951. “As he showed the plans to Fujisawa, Mr. Honda gave us an enthusiastic commentary: ‘Ah, I see. You have this kind of valve and the cam goes like that. This is what I call an engine, it isn’t just a two-stroke machine that looks as though it’s been cut from a bamboo tube with holes drilled. This will sell. Honda will do well with this!’ Mr. Fujisawa didn’t have any understanding of the plans, he didn’t know anything about mechanical things at all, so he just said things like ‘Hm, yes, that’s great,’” said Kawashima, laughing.

The now-legendary test crossing of the Hakone Pass took place on July 15. In those days the Hakone Pass was considered the ultimate test for a motor vehicle. Even lorries could only get over it if they stopped for a rest every now and then. So it was certainly a challenge for a small 150cc motorcycle. Kawashima acted as both the engine designer and on that occasion, as test rider.

“Actually we’d been using the Hakone Pass as a test track for quite some time by then. I was sure we could climb it, but I was pretty nervous because the Old Man and Mr. Fujisawa were coming along as well.

“If the engine had overheated or something and conked out right in front of Mr. Fujisawa, the Old Man would have suffered a terrible loss of face. That day a typhoon was approaching but history relates that the engine was completely untroubled in the torrential rain and raced up the hill in top gear.

“I joked to myself that it was lucky there was so much rain and spray, because it meant that the air-cooling worked liked water-cooling and helped keep the temperature down. Although I say that I went up in top gear, there were only two gears, which was just as well,” he said, laughing. “Looking back on it, I think that was a good, plucky little engine.”

The story goes that the motorcycle overtook the Buick that Honda and Fujisawa were riding in. Kawashima went over first and the three men were reunited at the summit of the pass, where they hugged each other with delight.

The Dream E-Type was Honda’s first four-stroke machine. The Japanese motorcycle industry had become more competitive about a year before and bikes with four-stroke engines were produced for the first time. The market started to show preference for four-stroke rather than two-stroke bikes.

Later, Honda came to be known as “Four-Stroke Honda” although in fact it was rather slow in switching to the new type of engine. But at this time a lot of four-stroke engines were fitted with side-valves for reasons of economy and ease of manufacture, while Honda opted for the overhead valve system.

Another difference was that Honda’s bikes, both two- and four-stroke, were much more powerful than other Japanese machines with 150cc engines.

“The Old Man probably wanted to make proper four-stroke bikes from the very beginning. In those days people’s ideas about two-stroke engines were rather hazy and since they burn up lubricating oil, which isn’t meant to be burnt, the Old Man probably only tolerated them as a kind of stop-gap at a time when he had no money and inadequate facility,” said Kawashima.

“For two decades after the launch in the following year of Cub F-Type (a two-stroker), Honda made only four-stroke bikes. The E-Type was the first bike the Old Man really enjoyed making.”

The E-Type’s frame, like that of the D-Type’s, was of channel-frame construction, but because there had been so much trouble with the failure of the wet-cone clutch on the D-Type, the E-Type was fitted instead with a dry-type multiple disc clutch. The clutch control was also changed to the more conventional left-hand lever system.

Kawashima recalls: “On reflection, we realised we had made a mistake in being too unique and we decided to make our bikes more conventional. But since it’s not Honda’s way to revert to old designs, we decided that the point of difference should be the quality of the engine. These were extraordinary bikes in the best sense. They sold well and brought pleasure to both customers and dealers.”

The E-Type went on sale in October 1951. Compared to the D-Type, which had shipped 160 units per month at its peak, 500 units of the E-Type were being shipped out a month only half a year after its launch and a year later, when it was fitted with a third gear, that rose to 2,000; three years later annual production reached 32,000 units.

Now that Honda had overcome the critical problems of its early years, the company would, as Honda himself had predicted, start to expand thanks to the success of the E-Type and seize the opportunity for rapid future development.

Kawashima riding a Dream E-Type at the Suzuka Circuit on April 1, 1992.

Honda CB200 Modified Into An Electric Motorcycle

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

The electric powertrain of the modified Honda CB200 has fitted onto a stylish aluminum enclosure

Manufacturing EVs from scratch is an uphill task in itself but it is a whole new level of challenge when one has to convert a vehicle already fitted with an IC engine. We have earlier witnessed such projects being undertaken in four-wheelers such as Land Rovers and VW Beetles but this time an electric powertrain has been fitted into a motorcycle.

An aftermarket workshop named Omega Motors, based out of San Francisco in USA, has converted a 1975 Honda CB200 into an electric motorcycle. The donor model back in 1970s and 80s was a hot-selling retro-style motorcycle with a cafe racer design. The makers of this modified prototype haven’t tried to alter the design of the motorcycle in any way.

Updated Styling
Rechristened as Omega EV200, it still retains a part-scrambler and part-cafe racer design with round headlamps, single-piece ripped seat and wire-spoke wheels lending it a retro appeal. The electric CB200 gets refurbished front forks, wheels and brakes while retaining the cable-actuated front brake and rear drum brake.

Subtle modifications have been made to the chassis in order to incorporate a battery and electric motor setup. The frame has been shortened and the welded-in rear fender has been chopped off.

The pillion footpegs have also been removed while a small part of its spine has also been cut in order to weld a mounting plate for the controller. Interestingly, the motor mounts from the original bike have been left intact while the new battery pack and electric motor are attached via a set of custom mounting plates.

Specs & Features
Speaking of specifications, the motorcycle has been fitted with an electric motor sourced from Golden Motor and raed to produce 5kW (6.7 bhp) of continuous supply and peak power of 10kW (13.4 bhp). This motor feeds energy of a 1.6 kWh battery pack specifically designed and built for Omega EV200. Omega has also added a Kelly Controls controller which has been packaged neatly under the modified fuel tank and seat.

Coming to its performance, numbers are fairly modest with a top speed of 60mph (96.5 kmph). However, the electric bike weighs only 111 kilos which is 22 percent lighter than the stock CB200. The motorcycle offers a riding range of only 48 km on a single charge while charging the battery takes five to eight hours.

There isn’t much to offer in terms of features but Omega has got the stock analogue speedometer and switches working. Most importantly the clutch lever has been repurposed to work as an analogue regenerative braking control. The most attractive addition is a small digital display to reveal battery-related information which has been covered with the same piece of leather as the custom seat.