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Electric dream: Horwin CR6 reviewed

By General Posts

by Fraser Addecott from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Sales of electric two-wheelers are booming and with manufacturers producing bikes like this one, it’s easy to see why.

It seems difficult to keep up with the number of new electric two-wheelers coming on to the market these days.

The trend was already under way and has only been accelerated by the pandemic, with commuters and others looking for alternatives to public transport.

Figures from the Motorcycle Industry Association show sales of electrics for June up 155% compared to the same month last year.

Sales for the year up until last month are also up 210% compared to the same period in 2020.

That is impressive growth, with the majority of bikes sold falling in the 50cc and 125cc equivalent categories.

Artisan Electric is a British company established in 2016 with a “mission to change the face of electric motorcycles and scooters with industry-leading innovation and product quality”.

The company offers a range of seven electric bikes and scooters – and the one I am testing here is the CR6.

This is a 125cc-equivalent machine, with a pretty cool retro-meets-futuristic look.

The air-cooled electric motor is powered by a 3.96kWh Panasonic lithium-ion battery.

Careful riding will produce a range of around 60 miles.

Haring around flat out – top speed is about 55mph – will cut your range to around 30 miles.

That may not sound much, but the CR6 is aimed at commuters and for jaunts into town, so it’s perfectly adequate.

A full charge from zero takes around four hours, but bear in mind you’ll hardly ever be charging from completely flat, so shorter times are more realistic.

Charging is via a standard three-pin socket and a socket in the side of the bike.

The battery comes with a reassuring three-year warranty.

On board, the ride position is relaxed and comfortable with a long and well-padded cafe-racer type seat.

There’s a round retro/modern, backlit, colour clock with a rather unnecessary rev counter across the top and a LCD panel with speed, charge level etc.

As with all electrics, the acceleration is instantaneous and impressive.

At just 134kg, this bike is light and it feels agile, manageable and nippy – perfect for the urban jungle.

With low-down weight, a decent aluminium chassis and an excellent turning circle, the CR6 handles extremely well.

The non-adjustable USD forks and preload-adjustable rear monoshock do a perfectly reasonable job.

And braking via a front 265mm disc and three-piston caliper and rear 220mm is plenty powerful enough.

The headlight is a nice bright LED and the “tank” is actually a lockable storage compartment, ideal for the charge cable, gloves etc.

It also contains a USB port – handy for charging your phone.

At five grand, the CR6 is obviously a bigger initial outlay than a petrol 125, but running costs work out at just a penny a mile.

Overall then, the Horwin is a solid little city commuter, easy to ride, with good looks and decent performance.

Specs:
Horwin CR6
Motor: Air-cooled electric
Max power: 8bhp
Max torque: 30ft lb
Colours: White; blue; green; black
Price: £4,992

Steve McQueen’s first Husqvarna motorcycle may sell for a small fortune

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by Gary Gastelu from  https://www.foxnews.com

1968 motocross bike valued at $100,000.

Motorcycle enthusiast Steve McQueen owned dozens of bikes over the years, but a few are more special than others. This 1968 Husqvarna Viking 360 was the first of the brand’s bikes owned by Steve McQueen. (RM Sotheby’s).

McQueen had a particular penchant for Husqvarna motorcycles, like the one he rode in the “On Any Sunday” documentary, and one is coming up for auction at the RM Sotheby’s Monterey, Calif., event on August 13.

It’s not just any Husqvarna, but the first one he ever owned.

His Solar Productions movie company purchased the 1968 Viking 360 from Swedish motocross rider Bengt Åberg just after he competed in a race on it in California.

The single-cylinder two-stroke was fully restored in 2014 and remains in mint condition, so its next owner will have to decide if they want to chance messing it up to find out what it’s like to ride in McQueen’s riding boots.

RM Sotheby’s estimates the Husky could sell for up to $100,000, which is a far cry from the millions that many of McQueen’s cars have sold for, but quite a lot for a dirt bike.

Motorcycle dealers in Canada blame rising insurance for drop in sales

By General Posts

Robb Hertzog, owner of Prairie Harley Davidson in Regina, inside their showroom.

by Gillian Francis from https://leaderpost.com

“I’m not going to say it’s all because of SGI, but I’d say three-quarters of it is.”

In just over three years, Robb Hertzog, owner of the Regina motorcycle dealership Prairie Harley Davidson (click here), estimates he’s lost well over $1 million worth of sales.

“I’m not going to say it’s all because of SGI, but I’d say three-quarters of it is,” he said in an interview Thursday, adding that skyrocketing insurance rates for motorcycles are leading to a decline in the amount of customers he receives.

Hertzog is one of many business owners in the motorcycle industry who have voiced concerns about the increasing expenses for bike owners. SGI is considering upping insurance rates again, by 15 per cent for insurance premiums greater than $1,000 and by $25 to $150, for those that total $1,000 or less, leaving businesses with increasingly dire prospects.

“They just can’t afford to ride anymore,” Hertzog said. “My younger clients are just not getting into it because when your monthly rate is as much or more than your loan payments, it makes it very, very difficult.”

Earlier this week, an SGI spokesperson told the Leader-Post that increasing fees are part of a plan to rebalance insurance rates. This would lead to an annual rate decrease for some types of vehicles and in an increase for vehicles like motorcycles that are perceived to have higher accident risk. A latest proposed rate increase is being reviewed by The Saskatchewan Rate Review Panel.

Insurance rates for new models with large engines, like Harley cruisers, can range from $2,000 to $3,000 per year. While this is enough to dissuade individual motorists from buying, there is also a chain reaction that extends to other parts of the industry as well.

Hertzog explained the number of motorcyclists attending their community events and fundraisers is down by half, leading to a decrease in charity funding of a few thousand dollars, and his bike repair team is getting fewer clients now that people are riding less frequently.

Collin Cossette, owner of Action Cycle in Moose Jaw, switched from selling street models to off-road bikes, a decision motivated by a variety of factors unrelated to insurance, including losing a franchise. He said the demand for street models is not strong enough for him to want to go back.

The few street bikes he continues to carry, have remained untouched for years, brands that would have sold in the hundreds a decade ago. Most dealerships in his area, he said, have lost around 80 per cent of their sales now that more expensive models come with high insurance.

Rick Bradshaw, owner of Schrader’s Motors in Yorkton, estimated insurance rates have increased around 67 per cent in the past decade, causing their street bike sales to decrease from 50 per year to 20.

Most of the clients who visit Schrader’s are older adults who have more disposable income, while younger cohorts are dissuaded by the expense. Prior to the insurance hike, he said more young women were taking an interest in the sport than ever before, but he believes expense has since reduced this trend.

“You can be a high performance car enthusiast and buy a $100,000, loaded-up, 600 horsepower BMW car and you don’t pay any more for that car based on value … But for motorcyclists with the same zero clean record and no accidents, if that bike happens to have a bigger engine or more horsepower all of a sudden you’re penalized dramatically,” he said.

As for Hertzog, he thinks raising awareness of the issue is key to creating change.

“We’ve got to find a way to get people out riding and enjoy life, but it will be a bit of a cost on SGI,” he said. “But the cost of that is worth a lot because I think the industry and the sales and the amount of jobs that were lost are way more money than SGI will ever have lost.”

The 3D Printer Market Is Being Driven By 3D Printed Products In Automotive Industry

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The Business Research Company’s 3D Printer Global Market Report 2021: COVID-19 Growth And Change To 2030

The growth in the use of 3D printed products in the automotive industry is a key factor driving the growth of the 3D printer manufacturing market. The manufacture of lightweight vehicle components is possible with the aid of 3D printing that reduces vehicle weight, boosts car performance, and increases fuel economy, and greater productivity can be achieved in injection molding equipment manufacturing using 3D printing technology.

For instance, in 2019, General Motors collaborated with Autodesk to produce 3D printed lower cost and lighter vehicle parts. Therefore, the growth in demand for 3D printed products in the automotive industry drives the demand for manufacturing 3D printers and contributes to the growth of the 3D printer manufacturing market.

The 3D printer manufacturing market consists of sales of 3D printers that are used in automotive, healthcare, industrial, consumer electronics, aerospace and defense industries. 3D printing is the method of creating three-dimensional objects by transferring consecutive material layers through a 3D printer.

The global 3D printer market is expected grow from $8.62 billion in 2020 to $11.1 billion in 2021 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 28.8%. The growth is mainly due to the companies resuming their operations and adapting to the new normal while recovering from the COVID-19 impact, which had earlier led to restrictive containment measures involving social distancing, remote working, and the closure of commercial activities that resulted in operational challenges. The 3D printing market size is expected to reach $25.26 billion in 2025 at a CAGR of 23%.

TBRC’s 3D printers market report is segmented by printer type into desktop 3d printer, industrial 3d printer, by technology into stereolithography (SLA), fused deposition modeling (FDM), selective laser sintering (SLS), direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), polyjet/multijet printing (MJP), inkjet printing, electron beam melting (EBM), laser metal deposition (LMD), direct light projection (DLP), others and by end-use industry into automotive, aerospace & defense, healthcare, food, construction & architecture, others.

The major players covered in the global 3d printing industry are Stratasys, GE Additive, SLM Solutions, Voxeljet, Arcam AB, Hoganas AB, Groupe Gorgé, Renishaw PLC., Markforged Inc., Made In Space, Proto Labs Inc., and Tiertime.

3D Printer Global Market Report 2021: COVID-19 Growth And Change To 2030 is one of a series of new reports from The Business Research Company that provides 3D printer market overview, forecast 3D printer market size and growth for the whole market, 3D printer market segments, and geographies, 3D printer market trends, 3D printer market drivers, restraints, leading competitors’ revenues, profiles, and market shares.

Uber Launches Electric Motorcycles And Scooters For Rides And Deliveries In Kenya

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from https://africa.com

Uber Launches Electric Motorcycles And Scooters For Rides And Deliveries In Kenya And For The First Time In Africa.

Uber has announced the launch of electric BodaBodas and bicycles for earners on UberBoda, Uber Connect and Uber Eats in Kenya, allowing riders and eaters the ability to choose a more sustainable option to move around and to have deliveries made. The launch is a first for Uber in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Sustainable rides with UberBoda Green

The launch of electric BodaBodas will not only offer an affordable and reliable manner of transportation within the city, but riders will be able to select a zero-emissions ride to help drive a green recovery. Using electric UberBoda vehicles will cost the same as a regular journey, as going green should never be more expensive. Riders can also expect the same door-to-door safety experience.

The launch of electric boda presents a 45% reduction in overall costs for Uber Boda and Uber Connect drivers, for whom fuel is the most significant operating cost. In Kenya, the boda boda sector employs over 1.6 million youths, the vast majority of which are based in Nairobi.

“We are doing our part to help transform mobility in the country so that Kenyans can play their part in reducing carbon emissions. Uber is continuously looking for ways to improve the customer experience, and we have a responsibility to invest in offering product innovations that make a difference to cities. We believe this collaboration will do just that”, says Brian Njao, Head of East Africa for Uber.

Reducing emissions while making deliveries

With consumers being environmentally and health-conscious, it is important for Uber Eats to be part of the journey. The introduction of electric BodaBodas can allow consumers to order their favourite meals while giving them peace of mind that their food is delivered in transportation with low emissions. In addition, Uber Connect deliveries will also be done using the newly launched electric motorcycles and bicycles.

“Uber Eats has grown exponentially across Kenya, with the app being available in Mombasa, Nakuru and Nairobi, which means more delivery people on the road. Providing electric BodaBodas to delivery people means that transportation emissions can be cut drastically, says Nadeem Anjarwalla, General Manager of Uber Eats in Kenya.

Uber will continue to actively work with cities to introduce eco-friendly products to decrease air pollution, reduce urban congestion, and increase access to clean transportation modes.

MotoGP Inspired Honda RC213V-S Limited Edition

By General Posts

by Dragos Chitulescu from https://www.autoevolution.com

MotoGP Inspired Honda RC213V-S Costs as Much as a Ferrari, Comes With Zero Miles.

When Honda first announced the RC213V-S a few years ago, quite a few people were hoping that they would at least get a chance to see this bike with their own eyes. After Honda took Dani Pedrosa and Marc Marquez to the RedBull Ring to test it, pointing out that this is the closest you could ever get to a MotoGP motorcycle, levels of excitement continued soaring.

Not long ago, we showed you a very spectacular Ducati 1299 Superleggera, which was already a very fast and very expensive motorcycle, and it looks like it still hasn’t been sold. But the fact that this RC213V-S just popped up is even more impressive. Because it’s nearly three times more expensive than the aforementioned Ducati, and it’s also much rarer.

Honda initially planned to release just 250 units of this bike, but rumors have pointed out that a smaller number has made it to production stages. It is a hand-built motorcycle in a dedicated factory in Japan, and the bike that is for sale here is unit number 007, which gives it an extra degree of coolness.

Looking over the specs, this particular unit is almost like the MotoGP bike but without the pneumatic valves and the seamless transmission.

Those were changed to provide increased reliability for people using them on public roads. There are also other elements to make it road-legal such as the headlights, taillights, side mirrors, a horn, and a license plate holder. While the “normal” (if you can call it that) version came with just 157 horsepower, this bike also has the optional HRC Sport kit, which should provide you with about 212 horsepower.

The parts included in the kit are just what you need to get the whole racing experience. There are many lightweight materials on this bike, and the way the chassis was built means that you will need a fair share of courage and skills to even acknowledge its potential. Not to mention the fact that just by riding it down the road won’t be enough for you to tell the difference from a tamer, albeit fast 1000cc bike.

All you need to do now is come up with £219,995 ($306,796), which is what you would expect to pay for a brand new Ferrari. But I guess it makes sense considering the odometer reads zero miles. Right now, I’m tempted to say that if I could afford to pay that much for a motorcycle, and if I had considerably more experience with race bikes than I do now, I would probably go all out and on a world tour of all the race tracks where MotoGP is held and see what it can do.

But I guess it’s considerably more likely for someone just to buy this and place it in storage or put it on display for years to come. And in 20 or 30 years from now, when everyone is likely to be riding electric bikes only, people will look at it and probably label it as a slow, outdated motorcycle, but a fascinating piece of history nonetheless.

Harley-Davidson shifts strategy, to focus on core markets

By General Posts

from https://www.livemint.com

  • The company’s shares climbed after the motorcycle maker’s new acting chief executive officer laid out plans to cut costs
  • The stock had plunged 49% this year through Monday’s close

Harley-Davidson Inc. shares climbed after the struggling motorcycle maker’s new acting chief executive officer laid out plans to cut costs and complexity and focus on the company’s strengths.

The stock rose as much as 17% after the unveiling of a strategy dubbed “The Rewire,” which Morgan Stanley analyst Adam Jonas said could make Harley one of few manufacturers to grow profits in the coming years.

“It is clear to us that HOG will be less adventurous in terms of trying its hand at segments and markets where the brand faces extremely low chances of success with high up-front costs and high risks of brand atrophy that could threaten the company’s long-term survival,” Jonas, who rates the stock the equivalent of a buy, wrote in a report Tuesday.

Jochen Zeitz, a board member and former CEO of sporting-goods maker Puma SE, took over as acting CEO at the end of February. He’s dialing back his predecessor’s turnaround plan to focus on expanding U.S. ridership, iconic profitable bikes such as the Adventure Touring and Streetfighter models, and electric motorcycles. Those goals echo the demands of an activist investor, Impala Asset Management, that reached an agreement calling for Harley to add an independent director to its board later this year.

‘Achievable Plans’

Harley “has become accustomed to over-committing and under-delivering; we need to set achievable plans and realistic goals,” Zeitz said during the earnings call. “It is clear that our strategy needs to be refocused to better align with our capacity and capabilities and also updated given our new reality.”

Harley shares were up about 12% as of 11:53 a.m. in New York; the stock had plunged 49% this year through Monday’s close.

Zeitz was mum on the subject of a permanent CEO search, batting away analyst questions by saying he’s focused on steering the iconic motorcycle maker through the crisis.

The fallout from the coronavirus was swift: U.S. sales had been up 6.6% before the pandemic took hold in mid-March, but the drop during the first three months ended up being Harley’s biggest first-quarter fall since 2010. After that 16% plunge in retail sales, Harley is in all likelihood headed for its sixth straight annual decline.

Slashing Costs

Zeitz resisted giving a new financial forecast, saying it’s too early to see the full scope of the virus’s impact. But he’s slashing costs and borrowing money to ensure Harley can weather the storm.

The manufacturer said it will save $250 million this year by freezing hiring, reducing salaries, trimming capital expenditures and retiming product launches. It’s also halting share repurchases.

Harley announced it’s in talks with major U.S. banks to secure $1.3 billion in funding and expects to tap capital markets for more in the coming weeks after sales of its motorcycles declined in every market worldwide, including a 13th consecutive quarterly drop in the U.S.

John Olin, Harley’s chief financial officer, said he’s tightening underwriting standards and increasing loan-loss provisions at the company’s lending arm. He stepped up provisions by $36 million and wrote off $8.9 million in credit losses in the quarter. Harley has been granting payment deferrals for some customers.

Reduce duty on Harley Davidson to nil: Report

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The report by the US India Business Council (USIBC) and Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) said the 0% rate could apply to all motorcycle imports being sold in India over Rs 5 lakh.

NEW DELHI: India should consider bringing down the import duty on high-end motorcycles (that include Harley Davidson motorcycles) to 0% for both complete built up (CBU) units and for completely knocked down (CKD) units, a joint report by two industry lobby groups suggested on Tuesday as part of an overall strategy to boost India-US trade to $500 billion.

The report by the US India Business Council (USIBC) and Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) said the 0% rate could apply to all motorcycle imports being sold in India over Rs 5 lakh.

The report has listed out interventions in 13 specific areas, which if resolved, will provide a thrust to trade between the two countries. Interventions range from reinstating Generalised System of Preferences (GSP) benefits by US for India, arriving at a consensus on a pricing mechanism for medical devices, modifications in India’s e-commerce policy, removing high tariffs on steel and aluminium imports by US, fostering greater cooperation in strengthening partnership in defence and aerospace.

“In 2017-18, Harley Davidson sold 3,413 units in India – a decline of 7% from the previous year. For CBU units, India had already slashed duties from 75% to 50% in 2018, but given that the duties apply to a minuscule percentage of the overall trade and for a very niche product, eliminating it altogether would provide a symbolic win for the US,” the report said.

It said issue of price controls for medical devices has invited vigorous discussions and was one of the original reasons why US Office of the Trade Representative (USTR) decided to review India’s eligibility for GSP programme

The report said India’s e-commerce policy, however, has engendered a whole host of issues that impact both domestic and foreign players, including definition of private versus community data, prohibition on cross-border data sharing, mandate to establish data centres holding sensitive data of Indians within the boundaries of India, informed consent, following due legal process in data sharing with Indian or foreign authorities, domestic versus Indian – product definitions; requirement for e-commerce app/websites to set up legal entities in India.

“India must also bear in mind that such a policy could prompt reciprocal action by US and other countries which may demand that the data for their citizens stay within the confines of their geographical boundaries. This could have an enormous deleterious impact on Indian IT and business process outsourcing (BPO) companies that have grown over the past several decades essentially by processing, analysing and storing sensitive health, financial, insurance etc. information for customers from other countries within India – the US is a major market for such firms and helps generate thousands of jobs in India.”

Harley has to pay huge duty in India, Trump revives import duty debate

“India is probably the highest tariff nation in the world. The United States has to be treated fairly and I think India understands it. We have a large deficit of $24 billion with India and that it is very high”. Trump Said

NEW DELHI: U.S President Donald Trump calls out India-US tariff a problem mentioning the American motorcycle manufacturer Harley Davidson has to pay high import tariff in India.

While addressing a media conference in Delhi, he said, “India is probably the highest tariff nation in the world. The United States has to be treated fairly and I think India understands it. We have a large deficit of $24 billion with India and that it is very high”.

However, he indicated that a trade deal with India could happen at the end of the year. “Working it out with India on tariffs,” President Trump said.

India reduced the customs duty on complete built-up units (CBUs) from 100 percent to 50 percent in 2019. Even then Trump criticized the import duty and called out “too high” and “not acceptable”.

On the other hand, India increased tariffs on completely knocked down (CKDs) units from 10 per cent to 15 percent. Harley Davidson’s majority of sales come from the CKDs which are assembled in India.

In FY2019, Harley Davidson sold 2676 motorcycles. It sells 17 Models in India which ranges from ₹5.33 lakh to ₹50.3 lakh.

Before Trump India Visit, India proposed a new tariff classification for motorcycles with a cylinder capacity exceeding 1,600 ccs, imports of which will be taxed in single digits.