Skip to main content
Tag

Cops

The “Biker Lives Matter” Organization

By General Posts

Rogue with his son Dale and grandson Reese – a family that rides together.

Click Here to Get Involved – http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

Article by Rogue – Founder of Biker Lives Matter, Sturgis Motorcycle Hall of Fame

I have been asked a lot why I and some others started an organization named Biker Lives Matter and why it is important to me. My answer is simple, there is a need for an organization that calls attention to the tragic loss of lives and livelihoods from motorcycle crashes.

In the 1970s, I became involved in motorcycle rights and safety. At the time, motorcycle injury and death rate were high so the government and insurance companies began trying to pass laws that they hoped would help protect motorcyclists when crashes happened.

I have been riding motorcycles for 69 years and both my life and that of the others who ride has always been important to me.

I have seen many people injured and I know too many that have died.

I consider myself one of the lucky ones to still be riding at the age of 83 years old.

CLICK HERE To Read this insightful feature article on Bikernet.com

SUPPORT Biker Lives Matter – Visit website to know more: http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

REVIEW: Polo Helmet from Biker Lid

By General Posts

Product Review by Bandit

When I came across an Australian Hamster, Keith McClure, who was manufacturing light, tough and DOT approved Polo helmets I had to check them out, test them and have them modified by George “The Wild Brush.”

The fact that this helmet meets and exceeds D.O.T. Safety Standards FMVSS 218 ….

POLO Helmet sits low and snug won’t blow back in the wind.

Simple! Mushroom or no mushroom look? Go for the Low-profile Polo No Mushroom Head Helmet.

CLICK HERE To Read this Product Review Only On Bikernet.com

Check Out the Polo and Beanie Helmets at Biker Lid Website.

https://bikerlid.com/

Warm Holiday Bikernet Weekly News for December 2nd, 2021

By General Posts

NEVER A DULL MOMENT—

Everyday is full of excitement around the Bikernet Intergalactic Headquarters.

–Bandit

With News from: The NMA, Dealerworld, Dealernews, Lowbrow Manuals, Mama Tried, Harley-Davidson Museum, Triumph Motorcycles, Norton Motorcycles, Tucker and Kuryakyn, Pillar Peak, Deadwood, Sturgis, Watts Up With That, Zero mandates, and Santa of course.

CLICK HERE To Read the Weekly News on Bikernet.com

SIGN-UP FOR OUR EMAIL BLAST —

Do the girls of Bikernet a big favor for the holidays. CLICK HERE to Join up to receive Bikernet’s weekly email blasts. It’s easy, no bullshit, relevant and informative for all things motorcycle. No spam, ever.

Thanksgiving Bikernet Weekly News for Thanksgiving 2021

By General Posts

Riding Free for 25 Years

Hey,

Happy Thanksgiving from the Bikernet and 5-Ball crew. We want you to know how much we appreciate your support over the years.

We all have so much to be thankful for this Holiday season. We have been lucky Mofo’s forever.

Hell, young builders don’t even know how lucky they are to be able to score parts at a swap meet and go to work building a bike, unhampered by a myriad of government agencies.

Ask some brothers in Europe, where every product must be approved by maybe not one, but a group of government agencies.

There are so many folks and aspects of American life to be thankful for. We are living in the best of times.

Have a terrific day, and take a moment to reflect on how good we have it in America, because it is the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Ride fast and free, forever!

–Bandit

CLICK HERE To Read the Weekly News on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today !!!

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Mid-South M.I.L.E. 2021

By General Posts

Bikers gathered in Dallas, Texas for the 29th annual Mid-South M.I.L.E. event

from Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF)

Like the Midwest’s Heartland STEAM event, the Mid-South M.I.L.E. brings together bikers from neighboring states to discuss legislative priorities, share ideas and build relationships.

CLICK HERE To Read this Event Coverage on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today!

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Pre-Thanksgiving Bikernet Weekly News for November 18, 2021

By General Posts

We’re Getting Ready to Give Major Thanks

Life is nuts and then we die. I find it so fascinating.

We’ve got great stories headed your way from ex-outlaws, stolen bikes and I’m about to start to launch chapters of the third Chance Hogan novel, exclusively in Bandit’s Cantina.

In addition we will post another Bob T story from the ‘70s with plenty of Girls of Bikernet from Barry Green. Hang On.

Have a terrific weekend and give lots of thanks and study gratitude, it helps.

And always ride fast and free!

–Bandit

CLICK HERE To Read the Weekly News on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe & Support Riding Free !!!

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Why motorcycle lane-splitting is Legal in California but Not in 49 other states

By General Posts

Why California lets motorcycles legally split lanes while 49 other states do not
from https://ktla.com by Tony Kurzweil

If you’ve ever been startled out of the doldrums of your afternoon commute by a thundering, lane splitting Harley Davidson and cursed whoever is responsible, you’re not alone.

But before you blast the California Highway Patrol with emails listing all the reasons why that congestion-cutting biker should be given a ticket and told to stay in his lane, there are some things you should know.

First, not only is lane sharing or lane splitting legal in California but the CHP wrote the safety guidelines as instructed in AB51, which was approved by Gov. Jerry Brown in 2016.

In fact, although lane sharing occurs in other states, California is the only place where the practice has been made legal.

But why?

Well, one reason is that lane sharing has been going on in California ever since motorcycles have been on the freeway, so it was important to set some ground rules, CHP Motorcycle Officer Brian O’Toole said.

The second, and maybe more interesting reason, is that it makes time spent on the freeway shorter, not only for motorcyclists but for us four-wheel motorists as well.

“As motorcycles are moving through, splitting the lanes … that’s one less vehicle occupying that lane,” CHP Motorcycle Officer Brian O’Toole said.

“It’s saving the average motorist in a car time … If we were to all of a sudden not allow lane splitting anymore, that’s a motorcycle sitting in the lane ahead of them,” O’Toole said.

But just because the motorcyclist has the CHP on their side when it comes to lane sharing, it doesn’t mean they can recklessly speed past you.

“It’s still a privilege … We’re the only state left, so it’s a privilege for us to do this,” O’Toole said

The CHP’s guidelines say bikers should only split lanes when the flow of traffic is 40 mph or less, and not travel more than 10 mph faster than the vehicles surrounding them.

However, nothing is set in stone, O’Toole said. It is always up to an officer’s discretion as to whether the motorcyclist’s actions are deemed unsafe.

Also, like motorists, motorcycles are not allowed to cross in and out of the carpool lane unless there is a designated opening.

“You’re not any more privileged than a car would be to jump into that carpool lane,” O’Toole said.

Motorcycles are supposed to be sharing a lane on one side or the other and cross over only when there’s a broken line marking an entry and exit point.

As for drivers, they can help out too.

“Move over to the left or right, depending on which lane you’re in, and create a little bit of a gap for motorcyclists to safely pass. It’s a win-win situation for both,” O’Toole said.

Ultimately, riders and drivers need to work together to save everyone time on the freeway.

Totally amazing: Veteran, cancer survivor reunited with stolen motorcycle

By General Posts

Procopio describes the moment of seeing his motorcycle again as “totally amazing.” That same night he went down to the speedway and raced it.

‘Totally amazing’: Vietnam veteran, cancer survivor reunited with stolen motorcycle after 3 years
from https://www.cincinnati.com by Quinlan Bentley

On Friday nights, the Lawrenceburg Motorcycle Speedway comes alive. The smell of exhaust fills the air and bleachers vibrate from the deafening roar of motors revving, as motorcyclists of all ages line up to compete in a high-adrenaline, high-risk race around a smooth dirt track.

These are the nights that James Procopio lives for. The 74-year-old Vietnam War veteran started racing motorcycles in his 20s, but had to give it up after family and life got in the way.

Procopio says he was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2011 and needed surgery to remove his intestines. He returned to the race track about four years ago after receiving his final chemotherapy treatment.

“I came down here one night, said, ‘Man, I sure miss that,’ and from that night on I put a bike together and started racing,” Procopio told The Enquirer, sitting in the back of a pickup truck on a cold, dark November night, the orange glow of a portable heater at his feet, while waiting for his turn to race.

Procopio worked for two years fixing up a red, white and blue 1980 Honda XR 500 to get it in racing form. But he was only able to race the bike once before it was stolen, along with his pickup truck, from his apartment in Mount Healthy.

The truck was recovered not long after it was stolen but the bike was gone.

“Every spare dime went into that bike,” he said.

Working out of his garage on old and vintage motorbikes, Procopio is somewhat of a local legend. He got his first job when he was 13 working on bicycles and motorbikes at Bishop’s Bicycle Shop in Silverton, where he stayed until he was drafted into the Army at age 19.

It was through his part-time mechanic work that Procopio met Ben Groh, who’s since become a good friend and racing partner. In the past three years since Procopio’s bike was stolen, Groh said he had been working to track down the missing bike on Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist.

“It’s popped up here and there for the past three years,” Groh said. “I’ve seen it come and go and I’ve been close to getting it and it slipped through the cracks.”

Groh’s brother spotted the bike at a local body shop, and he along with Rick Brun, another close friend of Procopio’s and fellow racer, were able to set up an undercover buy with Cincinnati police and retrieve the bike. It was returned to Procopio early last month.

Procopio describes the moment of seeing his motorcycle again as “totally amazing.” That same night he went down to the speedway and raced it.

Those who compete in flat track racing, in which racers drive on a dirt track with only rear brakes and must slide into each turn, describe it as more of a way of life than a sport.

“A lot of people don’t really understand it fully until you try it,” Groh told The Enquirer.

“It’s kind of like surfing: One good wave will call you back the rest of your life,” Brun said.

For Procopio, after surviving two heart attacks, two strokes and cancer, it’s become a source of relief.

“I’m in pain probably 24/7,” he said. “When I’m out there, I don’t feel a thing. Just everything goes away.”

The last race of the season in Lawrenceburg was held Nov. 5.

But Procopio says he’s going to keep racing “as long as I can.”