Skip to main content
Tag

classic

Using 3D printing to make a 1919 Harley-Davidson rideable

By General Posts

by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

This 1919 Harley-Davidson Is Now Rideable Thanks To 3D Printing. Vintage problems require modern solutions.

Let’s say you’ve decided to take on a vintage Harley as a project. Maybe you’re passionate about the early days of Harley-Davidson, for example, and you see an opportunity that’s just too good to pass up. The Motor Company has been around for over a century, though. While it has fans all over the world, as you might guess, some parts are easier to find than others.

That’s the problem faced by one Harley enthusiast in the Netherlands. He’d gotten his hands on a 1919 Harley-Davidson, and had been diligently doing hands-on restoration work for the better part of 50 years. Clearly, this guy was almost unbelievably patient. Eventually, though, even he got to a point where he had to think creatively to replace the one part that was holding him back from finally being able to go for a ride: a broken Bakelite distributor cap.

As the story goes, the man had searched high, low, and everywhere in between for a spare. Since there probably aren’t many out there to begin with, finding one on the used market seemed chancy. So, the restorer (who appears to want to remain nameless) reached out to Carl van de Rijzen from Visual First in the Netherlands, which is known for creating 3D scans of existing items.

1919 Harley-Davidson with 3D Printed Distributor Cap
Van de Rijzen, in turn, frequently collaborates with Edwin Rappard of 4C Creative CAD CAM Consultants to successfully 3D print the components he’s scanned. This was a unique challenge, for sure. They had the broken original distributor cap to scan, but a large chunk had broken off. How can you scan what isn’t there?

Luckily, the broken part was a mirror of what already existed, and not some other unique shape. Between the two technicians, they were able to successfully come up with a suitable 3D printed replica part. Since the original part was made out of Bakelite, crafting a 21st century polymer substitute so close to the bike’s 100th birthday seems kind of poetic.

It’s an incredibly modern solution to an age-old problem, and it will be interesting to continue seeing what motorcycle enthusiasts are able to accomplish using tools like this. For those who want to actually be able to go out and ride their vintage machines, it seems like a pretty great solution.

Harley-Davidson 1907 Strap Tank Nets Close to $300K in Las Vegas auction

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It’s been a very hot weekend for motorcycle enthusiasts. On one hand, we had the MotoAmerica series of events over in Atlanta, and on the other the mammoth motorcycle auction conducted by Mecum over in Las Vegas.

As far as the Road Atlanta event goes, we’ve already seen how Indian once again crowned itself King of the Baggers by barely outrunning Harley-Davidson. But the Nevada auction had a champion of its own, and its name is 1907 Harley-Davidson Strap Tank.

Described by fans as the most desirable of all Harley-Davidsons, the Strap Tank family managed to score a number of records when it comes to the sums they went for over the past few years. Back in 2015, for instance, one of them sold for $650k, making it the most expensive Harley ever sold at auction until that time.

The one we have here sold for less, but for an impressive amount nonetheless. $297k is how much someone paid for it, making the model the most expensive one to sell at this year’s event.

Coming from a private collection, the motorcycle is somewhat related to the record-setting one from 2015. It was put together by its owner, Ronald Moreschini, and with the backing of the guy who purchased the $650k Strap Tank, Lonnie Isam.

Seeing how desirable these bikes were, Moreschini set out a few years back to come up with 13 Harley-Davidson Strap Tank replica motors. While doing this, he stumbled upon an original 1907 engine that still had the original carburetor, but also on the native gas and oil tank, forks, and belt tensioning gate.

The motorcycle we have here came to be around these original parts, and was further gifted with original seat and wheel hubs. The result is so exciting, that the two-wheeler was even shown at the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum for a while.

Now it is probably heading over to another private collection, where it will most likely spend some time before it will most definitely show up for sale once more.

Highlights

  • Color Grey
  • Not for highway or public road use
  • Engine # 1877
  • Original factory engine
  • Original carburetor
  • Original gas tank and oil tank
  • Original belt tensioner
  • Original front forks
  • Original wheel hubs
  • Original seat

Mecum motorcycle auction returns to Las Vegas

By General Posts

from https://www.reviewjournal.com

Mecum Auctions’ annual vintage and antique motorcycle auction will take place Wednesday though May 1 at the Las Vegas Convention Center, featuring an estimated 1,750 motorcycles. Celebrating its 30th anniversary, the event is recognized as the largest global gathering of consignors, buyers and spectators who share a passion for the history, beauty and camaraderie invoked and inspired by vintage and antique motorcycles.

Among the 13 collections currently consigned to the auction are a total of 386 consignments, of which 325 are offered at no reserve. Private collection highlights include 96 offerings from The Dick Ray Estate Collection—which includes BSAs, Nortons, Triumphs and many others at no reserve—and another 90 no-reserve offerings from The Stephenson Collection, including a historic 1929 Douglas SW5 Speed model.

The J.C. Burgin Collection is another main attraction assemblage slated to sell in Las Vegas, and this group of approximately 50 motorcycles stands as one of the only collections in the world to contain at least one example of all 12 of Harley-Davidson’s famed Knucklehead series. From the 1936 Harley-Davidson EL and the ultra-rare 1943 Harley-Davidson E Model, all the way up through the 1947 Harley-Davidson FL, all 12 model years of the venerable Knucklehead are present and accounted for, all are in stunning condition and all will be offered at absolute no reserve.

Another Harley-Davidson highlight among the Vegas auction lineup is a 1907 Harley-Davidson Strap Tank with an original engine bearing No. 1877. Already one of the most desirable Harley-Davidson models in existence, this example is one of the most correct and original of its kind and has a rich personal history that is well documented, including time on display in several museums and a feature in the book “Heroes of Harley-Davidson.”

Included among the six high-quality motorcycles that make up The East Coast Motorcycle Collection is a restored 1911 Pierce Four Cylinder that is powered by a 4 HP four-cylinder backed by a two-speed gearbox and a rebuilt and restored 1940 Crocker Big Twin. This Crocker features Motor No. 40-61-113, which was rebuilt by the late Dale Walksler of the Wheels Through Time museum.

An iconic 1950 Vincent Black Lightning from The Sinless Cycles Collection will also grace the Las Vegas auction stage. The bike was originally ordered by Danish sidecar racing champion David Axelson through the Copenhagen Vincent dealer Villy Egen.

Bidder registration for Mecum Las Vegas Motorcycles 2021 is available in advance online at Mecum.com and on-site at the auction for $200, and it includes admission for two to all four auction days. For those unable to attend in person, enhanced remote bidding options are also available, with options for both online and telephone bidding.

Doors open daily at 8 a.m. with the vehicle auction beginning at 10 a.m.

For more information on Mecum Las Vegas Motorcycles 2021 and all other scheduled 2021 auctions, visit Mecum.com. To view the list, to consign a vehicle or to register as a bidder, visit Mecum.com, or call 262-275-5050 for more information.

Cut-Down 1926 Harley-Davidson JD

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Cut-Down 1926 Harley-Davidson JD Is a Throwback to Custom Bikes of a Century Ago

Like with cars, ever since motorcycles were born, their stock appearance and performance were not enough for some owners. Attempts at giving machines, regardless of the number of wheels, new capabilities, have led over the years to the many custom shops we have around today, but also to a wide range of styles and visions.

Back in the 1920s, motorcycles were already evolved enough to be taken racing. The novel sport naturally attracted lots of fans, including some that wanted to feel on the road at least part of the thrills riders felt on the track.

As a result, modifications started being made, and they ultimately began to coalesce into different customization styles. In the U.S., one of the first such styles, considered by some to be the first widely-copied one, was the cut-down. That’s not to be confused with the term that stands for modified Italian scooters from the 1970s and 1980s.

Taking inspiration from racing motorcycles, cut-down two-wheelers were made lighter by removing several elements, and visually unique by the elimination of the front fender and the modification of exhaust pipes and headlamps, for instance.

These changes were largely performed on the Harley bikes of the age, especially those from the J family. And we have a taste of how they looked like in the 1926 JD model we have here.

We found it on the lot of bikes going under the Mecum hammer next week in Las Vegas. It’s described as a “proper period custom with no radical changes to the chassis or engine,” but with all the enhancements one would expect from a cut-down model.

We are not given any details on who is responsible for the changes made to the stock JD but the green and red machine will probably make quite an impression next week in Vegas.

Bonhams has acquired online auction site The Market

By General Posts

from https://www.bonhams.com

London – Bonhams announces it has acquired The Market, one of the leading and fastest growing online marketplaces for classic and collectible car and motorcycle auctions. Founded in Oxfordshire in 2017, The Market has taken the industry by storm. In the last year, the company sold vehicles with a total value of £13 million and grew its turnover by almost 300% compared to the previous year. Its success lies in its technology, transparency, and customer service, which led to exceptional auction results: the company now sells an impressive 94% of lots offered for sale.

The acquisition adds another dimension to Bonhams. Founded in 1793, and one of the oldest and most venerable international auction houses, it has salerooms in London, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, and Hong Kong. Its Motoring Division, headed by Maarten ten Holder, is the premier auction house for motor cars and has sold many of the legends of road, including the world’s oldest surviving Rolls-Royce.

Maarten ten Holder, Managing Director of Bonhams Motoring, said: “This acquisition is a perfect fit for Bonhams and is happening at an exciting time in the car auction world. For the first time a classic car auctioneer will now offer cars at all price points, around the clock, to collectors wherever they are in the world.”

Bruno Vinciguerra, Bonhams CEO, added: “Bonhams is renowned globally for its heritage and entrepreneurial spirit, its expertise, transparency, and great client service, and these are all qualities also at the heart of The Market’s operations. This combination will play to both our strengths and allow us to become even more accessible to a wider range of clients. I am very excited about the future.”

Tim Joslyn, Founder of The Market, said: “I am delighted that Bonhams will be taking The Market to the next level. The combination of such a prestigious auction house, representing traditional high-end car auctions, with our premier digital offering will create an incredible opportunity to reach a wider, more global audience.”

Alex Fortescue, Managing Partner of Epiris, said: “We have always had a clear vision for Bonhams: a digitally-enabled business occupying the leading global position in its niches. This acquisition is another step towards fully realising this vision, further advancing the digital transformation we started with Bruno almost three years ago, whilst building scale in an important specialist area. We are thrilled that Tim and his team will join the Bonhams family and share this vision.”

This 1936 Harley-Davidson EL Was Once Featured on a Miller Beer Can

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Despite being rather old, Knucklehead motorcycles are still around in relatively large numbers, and a good chunk of them still come in excellent condition. It looks as though each and every one of them, either on display in a museum somewhere or up for grabs through whatever means, has something special and unique to offer.

In the case of this here two-wheeler, that something special would be notoriety. Aside from the fact you’re looking at a first-year Knucklehead (according to Harley’s numbers, about 1,500 of them were made back in 1936), it was also the star of several high-profile events over the years.

It was back in 2003 when the bike climbed the highest on the ladder to success. First, it was part of a massive Harley event in Milwaukee, meant to celebrate the company’s 100th anniversary, and then its image was used on a Miller collectible beer can released that same year.

The bike is presently part of the John Bernard Estate after being purchased back in 1989. It was restored by Dick Winger, a member of the board of the Antique Motorcycle Club of America, and now the plan is to make use of all of these things to get as much money for it as possible during the Mecum Las Vegas auction at the end of the month. Click Here to See Auction Page.

The EL is as original as they come, boasting the telltale red and black paint scheme and the 61ci engine sitting inside the frame—for reference, the engine number is 36EL1586. Most importantly, the two-wheeler has barely been used, as the seller claims there are just 40 miles of use on it, though that’s probably since the restoration was completed.

The Knucklehead is selling with a title, but no mention on how much it is expected to fetch (or on the reserve for it, for that matter) is made.

Barn Find Hunter Uncovers Treasure Trove Of Vintage Motorcycles

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Access to vintage motorcycles hasn’t been the same during the global pandemic. With museums shutdown and social distancing mandates in place, enthusiasts have relied on the internet to brush up on the classics. Of course, the story is much different if you’re fortunate enough to have a vintage motorcycle collection of your own. For the rest of us, the Barn Find Hunter video series scratches that itch with its latest installment.

Presented on the Hagerty YouTube channel, the series lives up to its name. From uncovering a 1928 Ford Model A Roadster in the U.K. to doting over a Shelby GT500 in San Diego, California, host Tom Cotter focuses on classics of the four-wheeled variety. Luckily, the latest Barn Find Hunter episode is the first Barn Find Hunter dedicated to motorcycles, and it delivers the goods.

Starting at the residence of Steve Davis, Cotter picks through cluttered garages and dusty storerooms to bring us a trove of rousing relics. Whether it’s Honda’s CT minimotos, Yamaha’s SC motocrossers, or a Hercules Wankel rotary bike, Davis’ collection consists of the motorcycling’s legends and oddities. The North Carolina-based collector didn’t stop with fully-built bikes either. Davis dedicates one full barn to discarded exhaust systems and a pile of cylinders and heads for ‘70s Japanese motorcycles.

For some, the dusty, rusty, and bestrewn collection might border on hoarding. For others, the old bikes have aged to perfection. Regardless of your slant, Davis’s efforts are admirable, but they don’t include a Vincent Rapide or Velocette Venom. For that, Cotter travels to Davis’ neighbor. Simply referred to as Robin, the Briton also shows off his Norton Dominator and Tn original Triumph Bonneville.

Unlike Davis’s expansive collection, Robin’s manageable stable is masterfully curated and maintained. But, which would you prefer for your personal motorcycle museum: collecting as many motorcycles as possible or a select few that you can feasibly look after?

BigIron Auctions to Host Classic Car and Motorcycle Auction

By General Posts

Featuring Chevyland USA Inventory and Classic car curator Monte Hollertz vehicles and memorabilia on online auction block, closing May 6.

BigIron Auctions announced today it is conducting an online auction featuring more than $1 million in classic cars and motorcycles, original Chevrolet parts and dealer memorabilia from the historic Chevyland USA car museum in Elm Creek, Neb.

Monte Hollertz was a Nebraska farmer, turned classic car enthusiast who passed away in Jan. 2020. He began collecting different models of classic cars in the 1960s. Hollertz opened Chevyland USA in 1974 and took over as head curator in 1980. Chevyland USA housed more than 80 vintage vehicles from the early 1900s and newer.

With more over 400 items, there is sure to be an item of interest for any car enthusiast or collector looking for items to add to their collection.

Among the items included in the auction are:

  • 1915 Chevrolet Baby Grand Touring H-4 4-Door
  • 1922 Chevrolet 490 3Dr Sedan
  • 1925 Chevrolet Superior Series K Roadster
  • 1947 Chevrolet Fleetmaster 2Dr Coupe
  • 1958 Chevrolet Impala Tri-Power 2DR Hardtop
  • 1967 Chevrolet Impala SS
  • 1969 Corvette Stingray

Take a peek inside the museum to see some of items that will be sold during the auction.

BigIron Auctions offer buyers an easy-to-use, secure, online platform in which to browse and bid on these classic cars and other items. There are never any buyer’s fees, the auctions are unreserved, and all equipment is lien-free. In addition, we provide complete transparency between the buyer and seller.

To view the items included in the auction, please visit the BigIron Auctions site when the auction opens for bidding on April 15, 2021. The auction will close on May 6, 2021.

NOTE: Interviews are also available for media who want to learn more about auction items or are interested in talking with someone from the Hollertz family to learn more about Monte’s history or the collectibles available.

About BigIron Auctions
BigIron’s online platform allows you to virtually “kick the tires” before you buy. We provide the seller’s information to our online buyers, so they have access to the same kind of information they’d get in person.

San Francisco International showcases early American motorcycles

By General Posts

by Colleen Morgan from https://www.moodiedavittreport.com

An exhibition exploring the history and development of motorcycling has opened at San Francisco International Airport (SFO).

The SFO Museum exhibition, in the International Terminal Departures, started on 11 February and will run through 19 September 2021.

According to exhibition organisers, early American motorcycles “reflect a bygone era of mechanical innovation and bold industrial design”. They are prized by collectors around the world and displayed on vintage rides, endurance runs, and at special events.

The exhibition presents fourteen ‘exceptional’ examples made prior to 1916, along with a collection of rare engines and photographs from the pioneering era of motorcycling.

It follows the development of the motorcycle – “one of the earliest and most exciting applications of another new invention, the gasoline-powered internal combustion engine” – from the 1890s until 1915. The exhibition highlights the progress of motorcycle technology during that period and the evolvement of riding “from a novelty, to a hobby, sport and a reliable source of transportation”.

As the presentation points out, “motorcycling in the early twentieth century was always an adventure”.

“Road conditions were generally poor and hitting a pothole or other hazard on a motorcycle supported by a primitive, stiffly sprung suspension could easily throw a rider off the bike”.

It also underlines the need for “athletic ability” to start and ride these machines and that motorcyclists had to be mechanically minded to keep them in working condition.

Early American Motorcycles is one of several exhibitions which are running for limited periods at the SFO Museum. Others include Hair Style, Instrumental Rock ‘n’ Roll, Paula Riff, Amelia Konow   and Alternative Process by the San Francisco University School of Art.

The airport also offers a strong line-up of permanent exhibitions which include Pan American Airways, Harvey Milk ‘Messenger of Hope’ and Spirogyrate, an interactive children’s exploration area featuring artwork by Bay Area artist Eric Staller.

The SFO Museum,  a division of San Francisco International Airport, is a multifaceted programme with rotating exhibitions on a wide variety of subjects and interactive play areas featured throughout the terminals.

Its mission is to “delight, engage, and inspire a global audience”; to collect, preserve, interpret and share the history of commercial aviation, and to enrich the public experience at San Francisco International Airport.

Phillips or JIS

By General Posts

What Works and How…
Photos and text by Kyle Smith, Hagerty Media

The unsung hero of the automotive world is the threaded fastener. Most people only think about the bolts and screws of their machines when they have to, when the components are stripped, seized, or broken off. That dismissive attitude, however, may cause these components to strip, seize, or break in the first place.

For instance, if you are working on a classic motorcycle, you are probably using the wrong screwdriver—and are setting yourself up for disaster. Hear me out.

Click Here to Read this Tech Tip on Bikernet.

Join the Cantina – Subscribe Today.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx