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Motorcycle Clubs and the One Percenter

By | General Posts

It’s no secret that Americans love outlaws, from the legends and lore of rebellious (and illegal) acts by the Founding Fathers, to the bushwhacking and bank-robbing capers of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, to the “bad boy” music of Elvis Presley, the Rolling Stones and Dr. Dre.

American culture and mass media have led inexorably to characters that embody this bad-boy attitude – a recent example being Jax, the heartthrob outlaw biker star of the TV show “Sons of Anarchy”. Western society has a long established canon from which we “learn” about society from fictional dramas. And the more we watch shows like “Sons of Anarchy,” the more a news story will seem to fit our mental construct of “how those people are.” The same is true of popular TV crime dramas’ portrayal of American minorities’ involvement in violent crime. And it seems that every time outlaw motorcycle clubs are portrayed in the news, it’s because of something terrible, such as the deadly events in Waco, Texas. Add to this the fact that the outlaw biker narrative has been largely controlled over time, not by members of the culture, but by outsiders and the misconceptions grow.

The term 1%er was first used in print in the pages of Life Magazine during the 1960’s. The article was a contrived response to an AMA rally in Hollister CA, after encouraging certain individuals to get drunk and ride through town the media then reported on ‘drunken’ motorcycle clubs giving rise to the popular misconception of bikers and also the movie The Wild One. The American Motorcycle Association stated that 99% of the people at their events were God fearing and family oriented. The other 1% were hard riding, hard partying, non mainstream type people. Thus the term 1%er found its place in popular vernacular.

Motorcycle clubs were historically born of a love of the machine, racing, riding and from military service. Gangs began for various reasons as well, but largely as a form of protection for outsiders or ethnic immigrants residing in inner cities. Their social structure is overwhelmingly democratic from the local to the international levels. Officers are democratically elected and hold office so long as they meet the memberships’ needs.

In contrast, Motorcycle Gangs can be seen as more autocratic than democratic, where leaders emerge more for their charismatic leadership and illicit earning abilities than for their abilities to run organisations. Motorcycle clubs are organised hierarchically, with strictly defined chains of command and lines of communication. MCs elect secretaries whose jobs are to maintain meeting minutes, keep track of committees and chairs, and see that old business is complete and new business is on the agenda. Treasurers also are elected officials and they attend to fiduciary responsibilities such as collecting membership dues, paying clubhouse expenses and financial planning for the future. Both secretaries and treasurers are required to produce written documents for the membership to review and approve during each meeting.

It’s not easy becoming a patch-holder. Many have compared “prospecting” – the process of earning full membership – to that of military basic training, where the individual is broken down in order to be reformed into a part of a collective: To think not of one’s self but of others, and to understand that one’s actions or inactions impact the team and the organisation. But prospecting takes months and sometime a year or more (5 years for one MC). Prospecting is physically, emotionally, and intellectually demanding and not everyone can do it. A significant amount of social status is conferred upon those with the steel to make it. Perhaps this is the only obvious similarity between MCs and gangs.

MC is generally reserved for those clubs that are mutually recognised by other MC or outlaw motorcycle clubs. This is indicated by a motorcyclist wearing an MC patch, or a three piece patch called colours, on the back of their jacket or riding vest. Outlaw or 1%er can mean merely that the club is not chartered under the auspices of the AMA, implying a radical rejection of authority and embracing of the “biker” lifestyle as defined and popularised since the 1950s and represented by such media as Easyriders magazine, the work of painter David Mann and others. In many contexts the terms overlap with the usual meaning of “outlaw” because some of these clubs, or some of their members, are recognised rightly or wrongly by law enforcement agencies as taking part in organised crime.

That sense of brotherhood was on display at a funeral for a patch-holder slain at Waco. Members of the Hells Angels, Bandidos, Mongols, Vagos and more than 50 other motorcycle clubs come together in peace to mourn the passing of a man who touched the lives of so many in his community. To them, he was much more than a biker or a patch-holder — he was their Brother, with all the familial love, respect, and honour that that word conveys. Possibly such a gathering has never happened before. This convergence of contrasting MCs was no media stunt. There were no media in the funeral that day (although there was one white, unmarked van, out of which came uniformed men clad in body armour and armed with assault rifles).

Perhaps the singularly most important distinction between outlaw motorcycle clubs and gangs is evidenced through philanthropy. Many motorcycle clubs are closely intertwined with charity work: MC family members are or have been affected by the maladies the charities seek to eradicate, and members of the local community are in legitimate and immediate need. MCs support a wide variety of local, national, and international charities that seek to end disease, poverty and hunger, but especially supported are disabled veterans organisations. Charity is to members of motorcycle clubs as petrol and oil are to their machines. For some, it’s a major reason why they join and stay in MCs.

Clubs have been observed providing 24/7 security at battered women’s shelters, holding motorcycling events such as Poker Runs to raise money for local families whose homes were destroyed by fire or natural disasters, or to help families stricken by some other tragic event get on their feet. If a member of the community is in legitimate need, and the MCs are able to help, they almost always do. Even if it’s just “Passing the Hat,” where patch-holders literally pass around a baseball cap into which members place what cash they can spare. This might not seem like much, but to a family in desperate need of short-term assistance, this can mean the difference between having electricity and water and going without.

The above puts perspective on the recent statement that certain US law enforcement officials and organisations have labeled outlaw motorcycle clubs as a domestic terrorist threat, something is that is obviously more concerning since many of these clubs are made up of veterans who have fought bravely in recent wars for their country.

Strider Bikes builds new riders – “Double Down Charity Program”

By | General Posts

Strider Bikes Announces the “Double Down Charity Program”

New program increases youth ridership and feeds two charities simultaneously via youth balance bikes.

Rapid City, SD – Strider Bikes, the leading manufacturer of balance bikes for children with over 2 million sold worldwide, launches a new direct-sale custom Strider program designed to further increase youth ridership and charitable donations. The Double-Down Charity Program (DDCP) will support partner-designated 501c3 charities and the Strider Education Foundation’s All Kids Bike, a national movement to install Kindergarten PE Learn-To-Ride Programs into public schools. This all while delivering unique balance bikes designed by the Strider partner company or brand.

The Double-Down Charity Program enables a company or brand to design a custom graphics package including a competition style number plate and a complete sticker kit. Then, for each customized bike sold, the partner’s designated 501(c)(3)charity receives $20 and All Kids Bike receives $20.

As sales climb over 200 units, the partners designated charity will receive $4,000, and one school (of the partner’s choosing) is donated a Kindergarten PE “Learn-To-Ride” program care of All Kids Bike consisting of 22 Strider 14x balance bikes, training and certification for the PE teacher, helmets, pedal conversion kits, approved curriculum, and five years of technical support. Through the Kindergarten PE Program, children enjoy the mental and physical benefits of riding a bike, including the fun, freedom and mobility it provides. Donations are delivered via Strider Bikes in the name of the sponsoring partner. Partners will have the opportunity to present the donation and be on site to see their All Kids Bike donation in action, further increasing the public relations opportunity for the partner.

The DDCP is designed to increase ridership at every level and to empower those who share in the vision of more kids on bikes; learning balance, gaining health benefits and ditching screens. “We are very excited about the DDCP and what it means for increasing youth ridership,” says Strider Bikes founder and Chief Enthusiast Ryan McFarland. “We wanted to create wins at every level, and this program empowers our fans, like-minded companies, and brands to use their influence to help create more mobile, happy and healthy kids across the US.”

The Double Down Charity Program is directed by Robert Pandya, a 25-year motorcycle industry veteran known for working on new ridership initiatives, increasing female ridership and his general enthusiasm for motorcycling. “I could not be more excited to work with Strider and share the mission of All Kids Bike, as well as work with individuals and companies who see how positive and powerful it is for children to learn how to ride,” says Pandya. “I know through personal experience that getting out on two wheels, powered or not, is one of the most freeing and inspiring ways to move through life. Combining that inspiration with the opportunity to elevate charities and accelerate the All Kids Bike mission is truly energizing for the whole industry.”

Pandya will manage the DDCP, working directly with partners to assist with graphic design and communications and act as a liaison with Strider Bikes. Each unit will be sold directly via a custom-built website page at www.Striderbikes.com, meaning the partner has nothing to inventory and no responsibility for fulfillment. Pandya will work with the partners to increase program exposure to their audience through social media and PR, and high visibility events integrating with the partner’s marketing teams.

“We have developed a program for large companies, celebrities, and charity organizations,” continues Pandya. “With the goal of having an entire generation of children exposed to riding on two wheels, we know that there are many out there who will immediately understand the quadruple win of kids getting a custom Strider bike, two charities benefitting, and the partner being associated throughout the whole program.”

To kick off the program, on April 27th Arlen Ness Enterprises announced the debut of their Double Down Charity Strider that will benefit the Grand Muliple Myeloma Translational Initiative at the University of California San Francisco and All Kids Bike donations toward the schools of Moorhead, MN.

Arlen Ness, the patriarch of the family custom motorcycle business, which includes his Daughter Sherri, son Cory, and grandson Zach, passed away on March 22, 2019 after a battle with Multiple Myeloma. “I know that Dad would have been really happy with this program,” says Cory Ness. “The Grand MMTI helped him manage his cancer and deserves our thanks. The chance to teach every kid in Dad’s home town about the fun and friendship that comes from being on two wheels is a perfect tribute to a man who simply loved to ride.” The Arlen Ness Edition Double Down Charity Striders can be ordered for direct shipping care of https://striderbikes.com/buy/charity/arlen-ness-double-down-charity-bike/.

For further information connect with Robert Pandya at Robert@StriderBikes.com, or log on to https://striderbikes.com/double-down-charity-bikes/

ABOUT STRIDER SPORTS INTERNATIONAL, INC. Strider creates and inspires future generations of riders by giving children as young as six months old the best first-bike experience. From rocking-horse bikes for babies, to patented balance bikes and pedal conversion kits Strider has revolutionized the learn-to-ride process and the childhood riding experience. Children across the globe are starting on Strider Bikes and becoming two-wheeling virtuosos – before they’re out of diapers.  Founded in 2007, in Rapid City, South Dakota, Strider has sold more than 2 million bikes and distributes products in over 75 countries.  Visit www.StriderBikes.com, Facebook, YouTube, or Instagram.

ABOUT ALL KIDS BIKE

All Kids Bike is a nationwide movement to teach every child in America how to ride a two-wheel bicycle in kindergarten PE Class. The campaign is led by the Strider Education Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit which facilitates donations of their Kindergarten PE Program to elementary schools throughout the country. The programs are funded by a coalition of parents, educators, health care providers, businesses, nonprofits and members of the general public.

*Peace*Love*Happiness Teams Up with Biker Belle’s Ride in Sturgis

By | General Posts

Celebrate the fastest growing segment of motorcycle enthusiasts while raising funds for worthy local charities.

This year Peace*Love*Happiness is teaming up with the very cool Biker Belle’s ride in Sturgis! This moto-centric event is an opportunity to connect with women who are shaping the motorcycle industry, driving change and breaking long held traditions.

The ride will be August 6th and take off from the Lodge at Deadwood and end at the Buffalo Chip!

Register Now https://www.bikerbelles.com/The-Ride

Upgrade your experience! VIP passes help support the Biker Belle’s mission to raise funds for worthy charities. Your contribution includes:

*VIP seat in the front row for the Biker Belles Forward Motion Symposium at the Buffalo Chip CrossRoads

*All access VIP wrist band to the Annual Big Kenny’s Pool Party at the Deadwood Mountain Grand hosted by Big Kenny of Big & Rich
*Live music
*Flaunt aerialist performances
*Outdoor pool
*Great food & margaritas

*VIP access to the live auction of 2 beautiful custom-built Indian Motorcycles by Motorcycle Missions- A 501(c)3 Non-Profit Corporation helping Veterans and First Responders who deal with PTS(D) and suicidal ideation find hope and healing through motorcycles.

*VIP all access and open bar at the Deadwood Mountain Grand sky

*VIP swag bag filled with Peace*Love*Happiness gear

Longhaulpaul Raises $18,500 for MS Charity on Yamaha Star Venture

By | General Posts

Paul Pelland Sets World Record by Riding on a Dynamometer for 24 Straight Hours

MARIETTA, Ga. – April 25, 2019 – Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, congratulates Paul Pelland, also known as Longhaulpaul, for setting his third world record by riding a 2018 Yamaha Star Venture for 24 straight hours on a dynamometer, while raising $18,500 for Multiple Sclerosis charity, MS Views and News, Inc.

The Longhaulpaul “Nonstop to Nowhere” event was broadcast live on Facebook in a telethon-style fundraiser as Pelland rode his 2018 Yamaha Star Venture motorcycle at freeway speeds on a dynamometer for 24 straight hours with no rest breaks or stops, traveling an estimated 1,674 miles. The event offered a variety of entertainment including Pelland playing guitar, eating bugs and raffling $3,600 worth of prizes, all while seated on the Star Venture. Thousands of viewers from around the world tuned in throughout the broadcast, with hundreds of donors contributing $18,500 to MS Views and News, funding educational programs for people living with Multiple Sclerosis.

After being diagnosed with MS himself, Paul began a million-mile journey raising awareness and funds as he toured the country on his Yamaha motorcycle. After 6 years, he has ridden 350,000 miles, raised $150K for charity and has shared his inspirational story with over 250 audiences across the country. Donations for this event are still being collected at https://www.longhaulpaul.com/nonstop-to-nowhere/donate-live.

For more about Longhaulpaul, his fundraisers, or this event, visit https://www.longhaulpaul.com. Follow his journey on Youtube, Facebook and Instagram @LONGHAULPAUL.

Prairieland ABATE of Illinois

By | General Posts

If you have never been part of a benefit ride you should know at least this.

Bikers PAY to ride. Something they could do for free. But they choose to pay to ride ,the fee can be anywhere between $10 to $20 or $30 per person. Not only do they pay to ride, they usually drop a lot of cash for the extras. Raffles, 50/50, and silent auction.

When you see a group ride by, they are probably riding for charity! Instead of getting upset because they blocked traffic or caused you a slight delay, please remember this. They are very generous people.

Give them space and your patience. It sometimes helps to have a little reminder about things. So please be patient and smile when you see them because they are doing something good for someone you may know, or a good cause. Please feel free to copy and share with friends.

Women on Trikes: “Wild and Crazy” True Stories

By | General Posts

With International Women’s Day on 8th March, we would like to showcase two stories from Women on Trikes series. Read how Susan and Nerolie got into triking and why they are living the dream with Trikes.

https://www.touroztrikes.com.au

https://www.rewaco.com

Susan – “Wild and crazy and it felt a little bit rebellious”

A surprise and spontaneous ride to high school on the back of a friends new Trike while living in a small country town in New Zealand, was the very moment I knew I wanted one. It was love at first ride, I was hooked.

At the time I was not old enough to have a car licence, but I will never forget how it felt to be on the back of the Trike. It was cool and it was different, lots of people had two-wheeler bikes, but this chopped up, backyard, custom made Trike was the real deal, it was wild and crazy and felt a little bit rebellious.

I moved back to Australia a few years later, and I never really saw many trikes. Every so often I would look around to buy one, but they were hard to find and never quite what I was looking for.

Most trikes were motorbike conversions but I wanted a long-raked style trike with a low centre of gravity but also one that would not spend more time in the garage being pulled apart and repaired. I’m not a mechanic, I just wanted to ride.

Life got in the way of my dream – kids, family, work all took priority for many years, and a trike was not something I could afford and it was not practical. How would I fit a baby seat to a trike?

In my early forties, the internet had made looking for a trike a lot easier, but they were still hard to find. I was prepared to travel to America to find a trike and bring it back to Australia, as there seemed to be a much bigger selection of trikes overseas than there were in Australia.

I finally came across the custom-made German Rewaco Trikes and could not believe my luck when I discovered they had a dealer in Australia.

I collected my trike around Valentine’s Day and it is still the love of my life. Since owning my trike and racking up nearly 50,000Ks I have met people from all walks of life, been involved in charity and fundraising events which give me a great amount of satisfaction but most of all I just love the wild, crazy rebellious feeling of cruising around Australia.

People young and old still stop and stare, and most fuel stops involve a conversation with a stranger asking what sort of motor it has. I still giggle at the reactions I get and the shocked whisper of “oh and it’s a girl riding it”.

Kids stare out the back window of their parent’s car waving at me, and I always wonder if one of them will grow up remembering the first time they saw my trike cruising down the highway and want one when they are older.

Nerolie fell in love with a Trike too

“Geez, that’s bright green, not sure about the colour. Then the green seemed to grow on us and now I absolutely love Kermmi!”

Growing up on a farm allowed me to ride motorbikes all the time…this sadly all changed once I moved into a town. Years went by and at the age of 38, I decided life is too short and went and got a motorbike licence. Read more…

I started with a Yamaha 650 Vstar. Due to an injury, I struggled to ride it or even get it out of the garage.

My partner Brendon and I had heard about trikes. We decided to look into buying one as this would enable me to still enjoy riding and it was something we could both still do together.

April 2016, we headed off to Bendigo to have a look at TOUROZ Trikes and maybe have a test ride to see if we liked them.

Col had a green and black demo RF1 LT sitting there.

First thoughts were: Geez, that is a bright green, unsure if I like that colour.

After some chatting with Col the green seemed to grow on us. Well the test ride did not happen, we said stuff it, you only live once!

We came home with that beautiful green machine nearly 3 years ago, and I haven’t looked back…

I absolutely love Kermmi. I feel so great riding, and the freedom you feel with no pain! I would not change it for the world.

Merry Fiction: Hogging Santa

By | General Posts

Hogging Santa
We Wish You a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

Santa Claus finds joy and contentment in modern society with a Harley, Faith, Hope and Charity.

All right! Something to do this weekend and it involves riding my hog to L.A., I could guarantee the tug-o-war victory – just wrap the rope around me – they would need a cavalry to drag me. I stuffed a backpack with essentials and went to my garage to dust off my 20 year-old H-D.

Checking everything on the two-wheels I locked up the house and kicked the beast. Difficult even to lift my leg to kick-start with my belly bothering us – he has to push himself into everything. I parked on the side-stand and stood to my 6’2” height. I held the throttle with two fingers and kicked, the hog roared to life. Sitting on it now I paced onto the street to its beat – good vibrations – ’70s charm seemed to be feeding itself into me.

Read the full story here

Lockheed Martin Donates Custom Harley to National Military Family Association For Auction

By | General Posts

harley_davidson_2__detail

Last year, Lockheed Martin commissioned Harley-Davidson to produce a motorcycle to commemorate the commissioning of the USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) because, like Harley-Davidson’s motorcycles, the Littoral Combat Ship represents a beautiful combination of steel and speed.

harley_davidson__detail

Lockheed Martin worked with Harley-Davidson’s Ray Drea to design the bike, a 2016 softail slim S. This coming month, the motorcycle is donated to the National Military Family Association, an amazing charity that supports those who serve, their spouses and their children.

The NMFA will be auctioning off the motorcycle Dec. 10. In fact, the online pre-bidding is open now.

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