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Paris Harley-Davidson, Adam Sandoval set new world record

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by Macon Atkinson from http://theparisnews.com

Paris Harley-Davidson and philanthropist Adam Sandoval have set a new Guinness World Record for continuous Harley-Davidson motorcycles on parade.

In an event dubbed Bring it Home 2019, 3,497 motorcyclists from across the country rode their Harley Davidson bikes through Paris on a 3.5 mile ride, the Guinness official announced. The record has been taken from Hellas Motorcycle Club of Patras, Greece, which previously held the record set May 22, 2010, with 2,404 Harley-Davidsons making a 2.8-mile trip.

Paris’s parade raised money for Motorcycle Missions, a nonprofit that helps first responders with PTSD. The $15 per bike registration fee was donated entirely to the nonprofit, with over 3,400 pre-registrations, said event organizer Molly Beaudin, who is also a dealer development manager for Paris Harley-Davidson.

“I don’t even know what to say. Let’s hear it for America. We officially brought it home,” Sandoval said.

See Sunday’s edition of The Paris News for more coverage of the parade.

Toys for Tots motorcycle ride on Sunday

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By Emily Blume from https://www.kwqc.com

DAVENPORT, Iowa. Every year TV6 plays a big role in making sure that every child wakes up Christmas morning with a present. This is all part of Toys for Tots and some are getting a jump start on their shopping this weekend!

The Toys for Tots Motorcycle Run with ABATE of Iowa- District 15 and the USMC Reserves have their 35th Annual ride this weekend. The event kicks off at 11:00 am at Wal-Mart on West Kimberly in Davenport, Iowa. The ride itself will get going at 1:00 p.m. and ends at the Hobby Lobby parking lot in Bettendorf. The admission is one new toy per person, visible on the bike. They are asking that you don’t bring stuffed animals, or throw candy, as they’re looking out for safety and health.

Everyone is welcome Sunday, October 6th to support the ride and you don’t need a bike to donate- they’ll be collecting at the start and end of the ride.

Motorcycle ride raises money for St. Jude

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September 13, 2019 by Clint Eiland at https://www.wbbjtv.com

DYERSBURG, Tenn. — More than 200 motorcycles, nearly $1 million and 450 miles.

Those are just some of the numbers involved in St. Jude Rides.

“Almost 400 people total, and to see it all come together, and to be here in Dyersburg, it is just overwhelmingly emotional,” Jill Libert, development specialist at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, said.

“One of the most well organized events that I’ve ever been a part of,” Stann Wiebler, marketing manager at Walter Brothers Harley Davidson, said. “They do so much planning. The police do a phenomenal job of getting us here safely.”

The trip started Thursday in Peoria, Illinois, where riders began a six-hour drive to Dyersburg. The motorcade arrived in Memphis on Friday, where they delivered a check worth around $1 million to St. Jude.

Wiebler’s father helped start the event 13 years ago, and Stann has done it the last six years. He says this event is one of his favorites.

“It’s a huge event in our family. It’s part of our business anymore. No decision goes in to our business these days without thinking about St. Jude and how it would affect it,” Wiebler said.

“It’s a very passionate group. They fund raise all year long with asking family and friends. They really are outstanding and selfless,” Libert said.

Each rider raised at least $1,000, with one couple even raising $40,000.

“Kids are precious. Thank you to all the people who are here to do this,” Kevin and Debbie Onnela said.

As they rode into the hospital parking lot, the patients and employees were there to welcome them.

“Patients, doctors, they all come out into the streets, and they have signs and balloons, screaming and yelling, a lot of tears flowing on these big, bad motorcyclists as they’re coming in seeing the kids,” Wiebler said.

“They do a lot for the kids. And I’m pretty impressed about that. They do a lot,” rider Brian Bruen said.

Organizers with the group say they raise more money each year.

10 Back to School Safety Tips from Red Cross

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Red Cross Offers 10 Ways to Help Keep Students Safe As They Get Ready to Head Back to School 

Los Angeles, August 15, 2019 — The school bells will be ringing soon as summer vacation ends and students across Los Angeles head back to class. The American Red Cross offers these steps to help make the trip back to the classroom a safe one.

GETTING TO SCHOOL SAFELY

  1. If your student rides a bus to school, they should plan to get to their bus stop early and stand away from the curb while waiting for the bus to arrive.
  2. Students should board the bus only after it has come to a complete stop and the driver or attendant has instructed them to get on. They should only board their bus, never an alternate one.
  3. All students should stay in clear view of the bus driver and never walk behind the bus.
  4. Cross the street at the corner, obeying traffic signals and staying in the crosswalk.
  5. Never dart out into the street or cross between parked cars.
  6. If children ride in a car to get to school, they should always wear a seat belt. Younger children should use car seats or booster seats until the lap-shoulder belt fits properly (typically for children ages 8-12 and over 4’9”), and ride in the back seat until they are at least 13 years old.
  7. If a teenager is going to drive to school, parents should mandate that they use seat belts. Drivers should not use their cell phone to text or make calls and avoid eating or drinking while driving.
  8. Some students ride their bike to school. They should always wear a helmet and ride on the right in the same direction as the traffic is going.
  9. When children are walking to school, they should only cross the street at an intersection, and use a route along which the school has placed crossing guards.
  10. Parents should walk young children to school, along with children taking new routes or attending new schools, at least for the first week to ensure they know how to get there safely. Arrange for the kids to walk to school with a friend or classmate.

SCHOOL IN SESSION, SLOW DOWN!

Drivers should be aware that children are out walking or biking to school and slow down, especially in residential areas and school zones. Motorists should know what the yellow and red bus signals mean.

  • Yellow flashing lights indicate the bus is getting ready to stop and motorists should slow down and be prepared to stop.
  • Red flashing lights and an extended stop sign indicate the bus is stopped and children are getting on or off. Drivers in both directions must stop their vehicles and wait until the lights go off, the stop sign is back in place and the bus is moving before they resume driving.

KEEP LITTLE ONES SAFE

  • Keeping all students safe is the primary concern for everyone, but there are special steps for parents of younger kids and those going to school for the first time:
  • Make sure the child knows their phone number, address, how to get in touch with their parents at work, how to get in touch with another trusted adult and how to dial 9-1-1.
  • Teach children not to talk to strangers or accept rides from someone they don’t know.

BE PREPARED FOR EMERGENCIES

  • Know what the emergency plan is at your child’s school in case a disaster or an unforeseen event occurs. Develop a family emergency plan so everyone will know who to contact and where to go if something happens while children are at school and parents are at work. Details are available at redcross.org/prepare.
  • The Red Cross First Aid App provides instant access to information on handling the most common first aid emergencies whether it be before, during or after school. Download the app for free by searching for ‘American Red Cross’ in your app store or at redcross.org/apps.
  • Learn and practice First Aid and CPR/AED skills by taking a course (redcross.org/takeaclass) so that you can help save a life.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossLA or @CruzRojaLA.

 

Motorcycle Clubs and the One Percenter

By | General Posts

It’s no secret that Americans love outlaws, from the legends and lore of rebellious (and illegal) acts by the Founding Fathers, to the bushwhacking and bank-robbing capers of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, to the “bad boy” music of Elvis Presley, the Rolling Stones and Dr. Dre.

American culture and mass media have led inexorably to characters that embody this bad-boy attitude – a recent example being Jax, the heartthrob outlaw biker star of the TV show “Sons of Anarchy”. Western society has a long established canon from which we “learn” about society from fictional dramas. And the more we watch shows like “Sons of Anarchy,” the more a news story will seem to fit our mental construct of “how those people are.” The same is true of popular TV crime dramas’ portrayal of American minorities’ involvement in violent crime. And it seems that every time outlaw motorcycle clubs are portrayed in the news, it’s because of something terrible, such as the deadly events in Waco, Texas. Add to this the fact that the outlaw biker narrative has been largely controlled over time, not by members of the culture, but by outsiders and the misconceptions grow.

The term 1%er was first used in print in the pages of Life Magazine during the 1960’s. The article was a contrived response to an AMA rally in Hollister CA, after encouraging certain individuals to get drunk and ride through town the media then reported on ‘drunken’ motorcycle clubs giving rise to the popular misconception of bikers and also the movie The Wild One. The American Motorcycle Association stated that 99% of the people at their events were God fearing and family oriented. The other 1% were hard riding, hard partying, non mainstream type people. Thus the term 1%er found its place in popular vernacular.

Motorcycle clubs were historically born of a love of the machine, racing, riding and from military service. Gangs began for various reasons as well, but largely as a form of protection for outsiders or ethnic immigrants residing in inner cities. Their social structure is overwhelmingly democratic from the local to the international levels. Officers are democratically elected and hold office so long as they meet the memberships’ needs.

In contrast, Motorcycle Gangs can be seen as more autocratic than democratic, where leaders emerge more for their charismatic leadership and illicit earning abilities than for their abilities to run organisations. Motorcycle clubs are organised hierarchically, with strictly defined chains of command and lines of communication. MCs elect secretaries whose jobs are to maintain meeting minutes, keep track of committees and chairs, and see that old business is complete and new business is on the agenda. Treasurers also are elected officials and they attend to fiduciary responsibilities such as collecting membership dues, paying clubhouse expenses and financial planning for the future. Both secretaries and treasurers are required to produce written documents for the membership to review and approve during each meeting.

It’s not easy becoming a patch-holder. Many have compared “prospecting” – the process of earning full membership – to that of military basic training, where the individual is broken down in order to be reformed into a part of a collective: To think not of one’s self but of others, and to understand that one’s actions or inactions impact the team and the organisation. But prospecting takes months and sometime a year or more (5 years for one MC). Prospecting is physically, emotionally, and intellectually demanding and not everyone can do it. A significant amount of social status is conferred upon those with the steel to make it. Perhaps this is the only obvious similarity between MCs and gangs.

MC is generally reserved for those clubs that are mutually recognised by other MC or outlaw motorcycle clubs. This is indicated by a motorcyclist wearing an MC patch, or a three piece patch called colours, on the back of their jacket or riding vest. Outlaw or 1%er can mean merely that the club is not chartered under the auspices of the AMA, implying a radical rejection of authority and embracing of the “biker” lifestyle as defined and popularised since the 1950s and represented by such media as Easyriders magazine, the work of painter David Mann and others. In many contexts the terms overlap with the usual meaning of “outlaw” because some of these clubs, or some of their members, are recognised rightly or wrongly by law enforcement agencies as taking part in organised crime.

That sense of brotherhood was on display at a funeral for a patch-holder slain at Waco. Members of the Hells Angels, Bandidos, Mongols, Vagos and more than 50 other motorcycle clubs come together in peace to mourn the passing of a man who touched the lives of so many in his community. To them, he was much more than a biker or a patch-holder — he was their Brother, with all the familial love, respect, and honour that that word conveys. Possibly such a gathering has never happened before. This convergence of contrasting MCs was no media stunt. There were no media in the funeral that day (although there was one white, unmarked van, out of which came uniformed men clad in body armour and armed with assault rifles).

Perhaps the singularly most important distinction between outlaw motorcycle clubs and gangs is evidenced through philanthropy. Many motorcycle clubs are closely intertwined with charity work: MC family members are or have been affected by the maladies the charities seek to eradicate, and members of the local community are in legitimate and immediate need. MCs support a wide variety of local, national, and international charities that seek to end disease, poverty and hunger, but especially supported are disabled veterans organisations. Charity is to members of motorcycle clubs as petrol and oil are to their machines. For some, it’s a major reason why they join and stay in MCs.

Clubs have been observed providing 24/7 security at battered women’s shelters, holding motorcycling events such as Poker Runs to raise money for local families whose homes were destroyed by fire or natural disasters, or to help families stricken by some other tragic event get on their feet. If a member of the community is in legitimate need, and the MCs are able to help, they almost always do. Even if it’s just “Passing the Hat,” where patch-holders literally pass around a baseball cap into which members place what cash they can spare. This might not seem like much, but to a family in desperate need of short-term assistance, this can mean the difference between having electricity and water and going without.

The above puts perspective on the recent statement that certain US law enforcement officials and organisations have labeled outlaw motorcycle clubs as a domestic terrorist threat, something is that is obviously more concerning since many of these clubs are made up of veterans who have fought bravely in recent wars for their country.

Strider Bikes builds new riders – “Double Down Charity Program”

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Strider Bikes Announces the “Double Down Charity Program”

New program increases youth ridership and feeds two charities simultaneously via youth balance bikes.

Rapid City, SD – Strider Bikes, the leading manufacturer of balance bikes for children with over 2 million sold worldwide, launches a new direct-sale custom Strider program designed to further increase youth ridership and charitable donations. The Double-Down Charity Program (DDCP) will support partner-designated 501c3 charities and the Strider Education Foundation’s All Kids Bike, a national movement to install Kindergarten PE Learn-To-Ride Programs into public schools. This all while delivering unique balance bikes designed by the Strider partner company or brand.

The Double-Down Charity Program enables a company or brand to design a custom graphics package including a competition style number plate and a complete sticker kit. Then, for each customized bike sold, the partner’s designated 501(c)(3)charity receives $20 and All Kids Bike receives $20.

As sales climb over 200 units, the partners designated charity will receive $4,000, and one school (of the partner’s choosing) is donated a Kindergarten PE “Learn-To-Ride” program care of All Kids Bike consisting of 22 Strider 14x balance bikes, training and certification for the PE teacher, helmets, pedal conversion kits, approved curriculum, and five years of technical support. Through the Kindergarten PE Program, children enjoy the mental and physical benefits of riding a bike, including the fun, freedom and mobility it provides. Donations are delivered via Strider Bikes in the name of the sponsoring partner. Partners will have the opportunity to present the donation and be on site to see their All Kids Bike donation in action, further increasing the public relations opportunity for the partner.

The DDCP is designed to increase ridership at every level and to empower those who share in the vision of more kids on bikes; learning balance, gaining health benefits and ditching screens. “We are very excited about the DDCP and what it means for increasing youth ridership,” says Strider Bikes founder and Chief Enthusiast Ryan McFarland. “We wanted to create wins at every level, and this program empowers our fans, like-minded companies, and brands to use their influence to help create more mobile, happy and healthy kids across the US.”

The Double Down Charity Program is directed by Robert Pandya, a 25-year motorcycle industry veteran known for working on new ridership initiatives, increasing female ridership and his general enthusiasm for motorcycling. “I could not be more excited to work with Strider and share the mission of All Kids Bike, as well as work with individuals and companies who see how positive and powerful it is for children to learn how to ride,” says Pandya. “I know through personal experience that getting out on two wheels, powered or not, is one of the most freeing and inspiring ways to move through life. Combining that inspiration with the opportunity to elevate charities and accelerate the All Kids Bike mission is truly energizing for the whole industry.”

Pandya will manage the DDCP, working directly with partners to assist with graphic design and communications and act as a liaison with Strider Bikes. Each unit will be sold directly via a custom-built website page at www.Striderbikes.com, meaning the partner has nothing to inventory and no responsibility for fulfillment. Pandya will work with the partners to increase program exposure to their audience through social media and PR, and high visibility events integrating with the partner’s marketing teams.

“We have developed a program for large companies, celebrities, and charity organizations,” continues Pandya. “With the goal of having an entire generation of children exposed to riding on two wheels, we know that there are many out there who will immediately understand the quadruple win of kids getting a custom Strider bike, two charities benefitting, and the partner being associated throughout the whole program.”

To kick off the program, on April 27th Arlen Ness Enterprises announced the debut of their Double Down Charity Strider that will benefit the Grand Muliple Myeloma Translational Initiative at the University of California San Francisco and All Kids Bike donations toward the schools of Moorhead, MN.

Arlen Ness, the patriarch of the family custom motorcycle business, which includes his Daughter Sherri, son Cory, and grandson Zach, passed away on March 22, 2019 after a battle with Multiple Myeloma. “I know that Dad would have been really happy with this program,” says Cory Ness. “The Grand MMTI helped him manage his cancer and deserves our thanks. The chance to teach every kid in Dad’s home town about the fun and friendship that comes from being on two wheels is a perfect tribute to a man who simply loved to ride.” The Arlen Ness Edition Double Down Charity Striders can be ordered for direct shipping care of https://striderbikes.com/buy/charity/arlen-ness-double-down-charity-bike/.

For further information connect with Robert Pandya at Robert@StriderBikes.com, or log on to https://striderbikes.com/double-down-charity-bikes/

ABOUT STRIDER SPORTS INTERNATIONAL, INC. Strider creates and inspires future generations of riders by giving children as young as six months old the best first-bike experience. From rocking-horse bikes for babies, to patented balance bikes and pedal conversion kits Strider has revolutionized the learn-to-ride process and the childhood riding experience. Children across the globe are starting on Strider Bikes and becoming two-wheeling virtuosos – before they’re out of diapers.  Founded in 2007, in Rapid City, South Dakota, Strider has sold more than 2 million bikes and distributes products in over 75 countries.  Visit www.StriderBikes.com, Facebook, YouTube, or Instagram.

ABOUT ALL KIDS BIKE

All Kids Bike is a nationwide movement to teach every child in America how to ride a two-wheel bicycle in kindergarten PE Class. The campaign is led by the Strider Education Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit which facilitates donations of their Kindergarten PE Program to elementary schools throughout the country. The programs are funded by a coalition of parents, educators, health care providers, businesses, nonprofits and members of the general public.

*Peace*Love*Happiness Teams Up with Biker Belle’s Ride in Sturgis

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Celebrate the fastest growing segment of motorcycle enthusiasts while raising funds for worthy local charities.

This year Peace*Love*Happiness is teaming up with the very cool Biker Belle’s ride in Sturgis! This moto-centric event is an opportunity to connect with women who are shaping the motorcycle industry, driving change and breaking long held traditions.

The ride will be August 6th and take off from the Lodge at Deadwood and end at the Buffalo Chip!

Register Now https://www.bikerbelles.com/The-Ride

Upgrade your experience! VIP passes help support the Biker Belle’s mission to raise funds for worthy charities. Your contribution includes:

*VIP seat in the front row for the Biker Belles Forward Motion Symposium at the Buffalo Chip CrossRoads

*All access VIP wrist band to the Annual Big Kenny’s Pool Party at the Deadwood Mountain Grand hosted by Big Kenny of Big & Rich
*Live music
*Flaunt aerialist performances
*Outdoor pool
*Great food & margaritas

*VIP access to the live auction of 2 beautiful custom-built Indian Motorcycles by Motorcycle Missions- A 501(c)3 Non-Profit Corporation helping Veterans and First Responders who deal with PTS(D) and suicidal ideation find hope and healing through motorcycles.

*VIP all access and open bar at the Deadwood Mountain Grand sky

*VIP swag bag filled with Peace*Love*Happiness gear

Longhaulpaul Raises $18,500 for MS Charity on Yamaha Star Venture

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Paul Pelland Sets World Record by Riding on a Dynamometer for 24 Straight Hours

MARIETTA, Ga. – April 25, 2019 – Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, congratulates Paul Pelland, also known as Longhaulpaul, for setting his third world record by riding a 2018 Yamaha Star Venture for 24 straight hours on a dynamometer, while raising $18,500 for Multiple Sclerosis charity, MS Views and News, Inc.

The Longhaulpaul “Nonstop to Nowhere” event was broadcast live on Facebook in a telethon-style fundraiser as Pelland rode his 2018 Yamaha Star Venture motorcycle at freeway speeds on a dynamometer for 24 straight hours with no rest breaks or stops, traveling an estimated 1,674 miles. The event offered a variety of entertainment including Pelland playing guitar, eating bugs and raffling $3,600 worth of prizes, all while seated on the Star Venture. Thousands of viewers from around the world tuned in throughout the broadcast, with hundreds of donors contributing $18,500 to MS Views and News, funding educational programs for people living with Multiple Sclerosis.

After being diagnosed with MS himself, Paul began a million-mile journey raising awareness and funds as he toured the country on his Yamaha motorcycle. After 6 years, he has ridden 350,000 miles, raised $150K for charity and has shared his inspirational story with over 250 audiences across the country. Donations for this event are still being collected at https://www.longhaulpaul.com/nonstop-to-nowhere/donate-live.

For more about Longhaulpaul, his fundraisers, or this event, visit https://www.longhaulpaul.com. Follow his journey on Youtube, Facebook and Instagram @LONGHAULPAUL.

Prairieland ABATE of Illinois

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If you have never been part of a benefit ride you should know at least this.

Bikers PAY to ride. Something they could do for free. But they choose to pay to ride ,the fee can be anywhere between $10 to $20 or $30 per person. Not only do they pay to ride, they usually drop a lot of cash for the extras. Raffles, 50/50, and silent auction.

When you see a group ride by, they are probably riding for charity! Instead of getting upset because they blocked traffic or caused you a slight delay, please remember this. They are very generous people.

Give them space and your patience. It sometimes helps to have a little reminder about things. So please be patient and smile when you see them because they are doing something good for someone you may know, or a good cause. Please feel free to copy and share with friends.