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Harley-Davidson T-Shirt Quilt Sells for $11,500, Money Goes to Charity

By General Posts

For more than a century, the Harley-Davidson name has grown so large that now it far exceeds the confines of just motorcycle manufacturer moniker. For some people – and they are not few – Harley has become a way of life.

For true fans of the brand there are few things that cannot be associated with this famous American name. From motorcycle-related hardware to less-so items, there are countless ways in which the brand is honored.

One strange, yet apparently very satisfying way the Harley name is used around the world is quilts. There is an entire industry dedicated to them, and the Internet is flooded with people bragging or trying to sell their quilts.

You can generally buy a Harley-Davidson quilt for sums that start from around $100 for a twin-sized U.S. bed. But this one here, pictured above, was sold at the end of February for $11,500.

It went for so much because there’s a story behind it. It was made by a British Columbia quilter named Bobbi Pardy to help Adaura Cayford, a 9-year-old currently undergoing treatment for an inoperable brain cancer.

Pardy spent around 60 hours assembling the quilt from donated T-shirt wearing the Harley-Davidson name and logos, sent to her from places as far as Saudi Arabia and Ecuador.

Once ready, the quilt was sold at the end of a 10-day auction event for $11,500. And even if that seems a lot, just think Adaura’s medication costs $5,000 per month, according to Alaska Highway News.

“I had to do something,” the creator of the quilt said according to the source. “I thought this was something I could do. It’s my time and that’s it. It’s a really cool T-shirt quilt.”

Despite the effort made by these people from British Columbia, Adaura’s fight continues. For those willing to help, a Go Fund Me page has been created where more money can be donated.

Garage Brewed Motorcycle Show Brings Custom, Rare and Vintage Bikes to the Rhinegeist Taproom

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by Maija Zummo from https://www.citybeat.com/

Hosted by the Cincinnati Cafe Racers, this curated invitational showcases 50-plus odd and awesome motorcycles and bikes

The sixth-annual Garage Brewed Motorcycle Show returns to the Rhinegeist taproom for an afternoon of paying homage to unique bikes and unique builds.

Hosted by the Cincinnati Cafe Racers, this is a curated invitational that showcases “custom, rare, antique, collectible and just plain odd bikes that are hidden away in garages and basements,” according to the event descriptor.

The 50-plus rare bikes on display are whittled down from an ever-increasing pool of nominations and include everything from choppers and custom cafe racers to rat bikes and restored Indian motorcycles.

In addition to the art on two wheels, local artists have hand-painted Biltwell helmets, which will be auctioned off to benefit Operation Combat Bikesaver.

Noon-midnight Saturday, Feb. 8. Free admission. Rhinegeist, 1910 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, garagebrewed.com.

Ford Mustang driven by Steve McQueen in ‘Bullitt’ sells for $3.4 million

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This was the highest price a Ford Mustang ever fetched in any auction.

The 1968 Ford Mustang GT that Steve McQueen drove in the classic car chase from the movie “Bullitt, one of the most famed cars from American cinema, sold for $3.4 million (£2.60 million) at auction in Florida on Friday, Mecum Auctions said.

It was the highest price ever paid for a Ford Mustang at auction, according to David Morton, marketing manager for the auction house in Kissimmee, near Orlando. The buyer has not been publicly identified.

“The hammer dropped at $3.4 million, but with buyers’ fees, the total cost is $3.74 million,” he said, adding it shattered the auction house’s previous record set last year of $2.2 million.

The unrestored muscle car, its “highland green” paint looking rusty and black upholstery splitting apart, starred in a 10-minute sequence in the 1968 film, getting airborne a few times as it sped through the hilly streets of San Francisco.

The car was auctioned without a reserve, or minimum sale price, a risky decision that could have forced the owners to sell low.

McQueen filmed with the window down so viewers could see he was behind the wheel. Although credited as the driver, McQueen actually shared the wheel with Hollywood stunt driver Bud Ekins, according to the movie database IMDB.

Many movie buffs view the chase as ground-breaking for its duration and white-knuckle drama. The sequence forgoes a score in favour of roaring engines and screeching tires. McQueen, playing the no-nonsense police Lieutenant Frank Bullitt, was chasing bad guys who drove a black 1968 Dodge Charger.

After filming, the Mustang was sold to a Warner Brothers employee, and later to a New Jersey police detective. He in turn sold it for $6,000 in 1974 to Robert Kiernan of Madison, New Jersey, who held onto the car until he died in 2014.

Kiernan rejected multiple offers for the car, including one from McQueen himself, according to the New York Times. He left it to his son, Sean.

“I would like to appeal to you to get back my ’68 Mustang,” McQueen wrote to Kiernan in 1977, according to the Times. “I would like very much to keep it in the family, in its original condition as it was used in the film, rather than have it restored; which is simply personal with me.”

McQueen died in 1980 at age 50. Robert Kiernan never responded to McQueen’s letter, which Sean Kiernan still has, the Times said.

Sean Kiernan told Mecum in a promotional video that his mother drove the car until the clutch failed in 1980. It went nearly 40 years without being driven until recently, with 65,000 miles on the odometer, Kiernan said.

1940 Crocker Is Expected To Sell For $500,000 At The Barber Vintage Motorcycle Festival

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by Andrew Wendler from

Though the name “Crocker” may not resonate among the non-initiated as readily as Harley Davidson or Indian, enthusiasts recognize Crocker motorcycles as some of the most desirable and powerful bikes of the pre-war era.

Founded by engineer and former Indian dealer/distributor Al Crocker, the brand saw its first success with the Speedway, a single-cylinder bike that quickly became a favorite of west-coast racers. Encouraged by his success, Crocker sold his Indian dealership in the mid 1930s and established the the motorcycle company at 1461 Venice Boulevard in downtown Los Angeles . Leading off with the “Small-Tank” Crocker in 1936, Crocker followed up with the “Big Tank” model in 1939.

Frequently built to customer specifications, several examples came equipped with a 91 cubic-inch v-twin engine (1491 cc) that helped the Big Tank earn its reputation as the fastest bike of the era. According to folklore, Crocker reportedly advertised that if a customer’s Big Tank v-twin was beaten by a stock Harley Davidson, he would refund the owner’s money. No record exists of a refund being issued. Often referred to as the Duesenberg of Motorcycles, the Crocker Big Tank is undeniably American.

Large and brash, the bike incorporates numerous aesthetic and functional design disciplines of the era, displaying both aviation and marine overtones in its design and construction. No attempt is made to hide the mechanical bits; from the bicycle pedal kick-starter to floorboard-style footrests and from the exposed fuel and oil lines to the tank-mounted shifter, functionality and elegance exist in harmony. Often, it’s this tangible and endearing characteristic that separates merely rare motorcycles from the truly desirable and significant ones. That said, most experts agree that fewer than 30 Crocker Big tanks were built.

This 1940 Crocker Big Tank on the block at Barber features reasonably well-documented history, although it has seen a significant amount of reconstructive surgery. Reportedly the personal bike of one-time Crocker employee and machinist Elmo Looper, the bike eventually found its way to Jungle Jim’s, an L.A. scrapyard where it was eventually purchased and saved from the crusher sometime in the 1950s. After passing through a series of owners, the bike made its way to the East Coast, where the current owner undertook a restoration process that consumed nearly 15 years. The frame is spliced with a donor frame, the front forks, gas and oil tanks and fenders are careful reproductions, and the engine and gearbox were rebuilt by vintage bike savant Mike Lang.

Pre-auction estimates suggest the Crocker Big Tank V-Twin will command between $495,000 and $595,000 U.S. when the hammer falls.

 

1941 Knucklehead at Auction

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1941 FL Harley Davidson at auction now!
1st Year for the 74” Knucklehead

In late 1941, America would be plunged into war after the attack on Pearl Harbor, and Harley-Davidson with it. It was also the first year that HD released the FL. The 1941 model had the OHV Knucklehead engine, which replaced the Flathead back in 1936, but this was the first year that the engine size increased from 61 to 74 cubic inches.

Your chance to own a super sweet machine!
Bid or watch now—auction takes place on October 10th

Visit Auction by Clicking HERE

‘Bullitt’ Mustang auction-bound next January at Kissimmee sale

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The Highland Green 1968 Mustang fastback that starred alongside Steve McQueen in Bullitt is, quite possibly, the most-recognized Ford Mustang on the planet, despite spending decades in the shadows. After returning to the spotlight in 2018, the car has made appearances at auto shows, museums, concours d’elegance events, and even on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The Bullitt Mustang has been in the Kiernan family since 1974, but next January may well become the most expensive Mustang ever sold at auction when it crosses the stage during Mecum’s Kissimmee, Florida, sale.

In January 1968, Warner Brothers purchased a pair of S-code Highland Green Mustang fastbacks, with sequential vehicle identification numbers, for use in the filming of the movie. Chassis 8R02S125558 was modified for use as the stunt car, while its twin, chassis 8R02S125559, was selected as the hero car, used primarily for close-ups. Both received chassis reinforcements, heavy-duty front springs, Koni shocks and a thicker anti-roll bar, and their already-potent 390 V-8s gained machined heads, larger four-barrel carburetors and a hotter ignition for added performance.

From there, the paths of the two cars diverged. Chassis 558 received a roll bar that doubled as a camera mount, and a small generator (needed to power cameras and lights) was installed in its trunk. Once production of the movie wrapped, only one of the cars – chassis 559 – remained in salable condition, while the badly damaged stunt car, chassis 558, was sold for scrap. Long considered lost to history, chassis 558 surfaced early last year, rescued from a Mexican junkyard in 2016.

Chassis 559 was purchased by Warner Brothers employee Robert Ross, who kept the car for nearly two years before advertising it for sale in Hemmings Motor News in 1970. Its next owner, fittingly, was New Jersey police detective Frank Marranca, who reportedly paid Ross $6,000 for the screen-used Mustang. Marranca kept the car until 1974, when it sold to Robert Kiernan for the same $6,000 the detective had paid for it in 1970.

In 1977, Steve McQueen contacted the Kiernans looking to reacquire the Bullitt Mustang, which was then in use as a daily driver. An equivalent Mustang was offered in exchange (plus, presumably, some unspecified amount of cash), but the New Jersey couple opted to keep the Bullitt Mustang instead. In 1979, Robert’s wife Robbie purchased “Bulitt” vanity plates for the couple’s anniversary, and nearly 40 years later, these remain on the car.

In 1989, the Kiernans – now with nine-year-old son Sean – relocated to Kentucky, and then six years later, to Tennessee. Numerous Mustang collectors (and print publications) contacted the family over the years, inquiring about the Bullitt Mustang, but the answer was always the same; the car wasn’t for sale, and they weren’t interested in having the car featured in a magazine. Circa 2001, Robert and Sean began a restoration of the car, but the project didn’t progress at the originally intended speed and was soon set aside.

Robert Kiernan died in 2014, passing the Mustang along to Sean. A year later, Sean let slip to his boss, Casey Wallace, that he was the owner of the car, prompting Wallace to enlist the help of friend and filmmaker Ken Horstmann to document the car’s history. One minor detail delayed the start of the video’s production: In 2015, the Bullitt Mustang was in pieces, the restoration begun in 2001 never completed.

Instead of hastily restoring the irreplaceable Mustang, Sean instead opted to reassemble the car, which remains largely original throughout (its rebuilt and repainted 390 V-8 a notable exception). This task was completed in 2016, and on July 4, Sean fired the 390 V-8 for the first time in 15-plus years. In 2017, the Mustang was reunited with a member of the McQueen family – Molly McQueen, Steve’s granddaughter – who met with Sean at a Ford design studio in Dearborn, Michigan.

Its reemergence came in January 2018, at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Michigan. Three months later, thanks to its place on the National Historic Vehicle Register, it was displayed on the National Mall, part of an Historic Vehicle Association exhibit that included the first Chrysler minivan (a 1984 Plymouth Voyager LE) and the Ferrari-replica Modena Spyder that appeared in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. In July 2018, the Bullitt Mustang appeared at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, where it was driven up the hill in pursuit of a black ’68 Dodge Charger said to be used in the filming of the movie.

The decision to sell a car that’s been a part of his family for 45 years could not have been an easy one for Sean, but it’s worth remembering that the Bullitt Mustang is no ordinary collector car. The demands of ownership include constant appearance requests, the liabilities of shipping (in some cases, internationally), and, ironically, the inability to simply enjoy the car for the occasional drive without interruption or serious financial risk. Though some will view this as cashing in on the car’s history, it’s almost surely about returning to a normal life, albeit one with a comfortable reserve in the bank.

Dana Mecum announced the Bullitt Mustang’s upcoming sale, alongside Sean Kiernan, at the firm’s Monterey auction. No pre-auction estimate has been announced, though it’s a safe bet that the sale will set a record for a Ford Mustang sold at auction.

Mecum’s Kissimmee Auction takes place January 2-12, 2020, at the Osceola Heritage Park in Kissimmee, Florida. For further details, visit Mecum.com.

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