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Highsider Custom Motorcycle Components Now Available in the USA

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Paaschburg & Wunderlich USA, LLC, 16315 Monterey Rd., Ste. 100 Morgan Hill, CA 95037

Contact: Holger Mohr, Holger.Mohr@pwonline.us

HIGHSIDER(TM) Custom Motorcycle Components Now Available in the USA
German Engineered – For whatever you ride!

(Morgan Hill, CA, June 4, 2021) — Paaschburg & Wunderlich USA, LLC, the North American subsidiary of the leading European distributor, announces the launch of its premium Highsider brand for the North American market.

Featuring modern styling, efficient technology, and superior quality, the initial product launch includes mirrors, headlights, turn signals, taillights, and related accessories such as handlebar weights, handlebar grips and load equalizers. High functionality, innovative design, and value for price paid are the brand’s hallmarks. Most Highsider components are TUV or EC-Approved, a certification not necessary in the U.S. but an indication of Highsider‘s rigorous testing and quality stance.

Founded in 2008 by Paaschburg & Wunderlich GmbH, Highsider is Europe’s market leader for innovative lighting technology and high-quality motorcycle accessories. According to company Co-owner and CEO, Dr. Oliver Moosmayer, this expansion across the pond follows the company philosophy of “Progress Instead of Stagnation.”

“We are extremely proud and happy to announce the creation of our U.S. organization and the official launch of the Highsider brand in North America. It has always been part of our plan to bring our innovative products to the U.S. market with local inventory and pricing in U.S. dollars to make it very convenient to shop for our products,” said Moosmayer.

Paaschburg and Wunderlich teamed up for the strategic planning and execution of this new venture with industry executive veteran Holger Mohr, who will lead the day-to-day operations as President. “I am extremely excited to lead the efforts in bringing this distinctive brand and product line to riders in the States,” said Mohr. “Nothing gets me more fired up than cool, inventive motorcycle parts, and Highsider is just that.”

“Highsider products are fully stocked and ready to ship from the company warehouse in California. B2B and B2C websites are fully operational. “Our dealers will benefit from the parent company’s proven SAP Business One e-commerce platform, offering efficient interactions and timely communications,”

Mohr added “We have teamed up with WPS and Tucker Powersports for U.S. distribution and are ready to educate dealers about the line.”

For more information about Highsider and the U.S. product portfolio visit www.highsider-us.com Dealers can order online at www.pwonline.us or via phone at 408-465-4555.

New Pan America motorcycle drawing national attention

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by Sarah Hauer from https://www.jsonline.com

Harley-Davidson Inc.’s newest bike — a less expensive and lighter motorcycle — is drawing national attention as the company tries to lure new riders.

Harley-Davidson’s Pan America is arriving at hundreds of dealerships now.

“(The Pan America) is definitely not your dad’s Harley-Davidson cruiser,” New York Times reporter Mark Gardiner wrote.

The Pan America is about $2,000 cheaper and 200 pounds lighter than Harley-Davidson’s most popular touring bikes. The base model of the Pan America is around 530 pounds and starts at $17,319.

Pan America’s launch was delayed a year. The company held a virtual launch event in February.

Kevin Duke, who writes about motorcycles, was impressed by his test ride of the new bike.

“The news about Harley for the past couple of years has been quite pessimistic,” said Duke, the editor in chief at Thunder Press in the New York Times article. “With the older demographic aging out, there was no real hint at what the company could do to gain market share, but this really changes it. The new motor is that good.”

The Milwaukee-based company has been trying to expand its customer base for years.

The company experienced a steep decline in sales during the COVID-19 pandemic. Motorcycle sales were up 9% worldwide for the company during its most recent fiscal quarter. That bump was driven by a 30% increase in North America motorcycle sales over the same three-month time period last year.

Harley-Davidson launched its all-electric motorcycle brand LiveWire in May. The first motorcycle branded as a LiveWire bike is scheduled to premiere at the International Motorcycle Show on July 9.

Historic Off-Road Show at the Harley-Davidson Museum

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by Skyler Chun from https://www.milwaukeemag.com

Preview: A Historic Show at the Harley-Davidson Museum. Learn all about the history of off-road motorcycling at the Harley-Davidson Museum.

A new exhibit – about the storied past of off-road motorcycles and the people who rode them – has rolled into the Harley-Davidson Museum.

“There’s a deep history here with this type of riding,” exhibits curator David Kreidler says, adding that the company has long made special motorcycles designed to be ridden across difficult terrain. After all, when the company was founded in 1903, roads weren’t widely paved, and riders needed to be able to maneuver their bikes across rutted earth, or dodge fallen logs and debris.

The “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” exhibit was created to coincide with the introduction of the Pan America adventure-touring motorcycle.

One of the highlights of the exhibit, “Off-Road Harley-Davidson,” is the LiveWire, the company’s first all-electric motorcycle. The bike was featured prominently in the Apple TV+ show “Long Way Up,” which followed Ewan McGregor and his friend motorbiking from South America to Los Angeles. Older bikes are also on display.

While the museum is open to the public, it’s planning virtual events as well. To replicate the experience of walking through the galleries, Kridler will lead tours of the exhibit space that viewers can access online if they’d rather not visit in person.

“Off-Road Harley-Davidson” looks back at Harley’s history of all-terrain motorcycles. Visit the Harley-Davidson webpage for more information.

“Off-Road Harley-Davidson” exhibit celebrates the company’s past
by Mark Gardiner from https://www.revzilla.com

To celebrate the launch of its Pan America adventure bike, The Motor Company recently mounted a lovely exhibit called “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” at its museum in Milwaukee. Unfortunately, just as the exhibit was due to open to the public, a surge in COVID cases forced Milwaukee County to close museums!

I recently got a private tour of the exhibit from curator Dave Kreidler. You too can join Dave for a virtual gallery chat on Thursday (cost $6 or free for museum pass holders). The museum expects to reopen to the public next month.

The Pan America has been engineered for everything from comfortable touring to exploring gravel or dirt backroads and taking sand, mud and the occasional river crossing in stride. That might seem like a radical change for Harley-Davidson, but only if you forget that the company’s been selling motorcycles for more than a century. For the first few decades of its existence, sand, mud, and water crossings weren’t off-road challenges — they were features of American roads.

Harley-Davidson is older than 99.9 percent of U.S. paved roads

The first modern asphalt roads were paved in the mid-1800s, before cars and motorcycles. Bicycles became popular in the 1880s and bicyclists were the first group to lobby governments for improved roads. Still, by 1900 less than five percent of America’s roads were paved. There was a bit of an asphalt boom during the First World War, but it was limited to roads connecting manufacturing centers to ports. The war in Europe convinced the U.S. Army that trucks — and roads that could support them — were a strategic asset.

After the war, the Army sent 79 vehicles, 260 enlisted men and 35 officers, including a young Lt. Col. named D. Eisenhower, on a cross-country convoy to demonstrate the practicality of trucks and the need for better highways. They traveled from Washington, D.C. to San Francisco on the Lincoln Highway. Eisenhower returned dismayed by the dismal state of the country’s roads and bridges. Dozens of flimsy wooden bridges were destroyed by the Army convoy!

Little was done to improve the situation until the Works Progress Administration improved and paved about half a million miles of roads as part of the New Deal. Many farm-to-market roads were paved; one New Deal slogan was “Get the farmers out of the mud!”

Ike never lost his interest in road construction and as president he signed the bill that created the Interstate Highway System.

That’s a roundabout way of pointing out that the first 100,000 or so Harley-Davidson motorcycles were used on a mix of surfaces that riders of today would say called for an ADV bike, if not a full-on dual-sport. Back then, though, there were just “motorcycles.”

Curator Dave Kreidler shows “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” exhibit

The exhibit’s not arranged chronologically. “We organized it in five sections, based on the type of riding that the company was selling to people,” Dave said as we stood in front of a 1964 BTH model.

Sold as the Scat, the BTH was a 175 cc two-stroke that’s recognizable as a dual-sport in spite of its rigid rear end and a plunger fork with only a couple of inches of travel. It was one of the last models in a line of lightweight motorcycles based on the German DKW RT 125. (DKW’s intellectual property was essentially seized as war reparations, and versions of the RT 125 were sold as BSA Bantams in Britain, Harley-Davidson Hummers in the United States and the MMZ M-1A Moskva in Russia.)

The Scat was a road-legal trail bike sold with a high pipe, high fenders, and fairly knobby trials-pattern tires. An extra-low final-drive ratio was available as an option. It was one of many Harley-Davidsons that, over the years, were marketed as perfect vehicles for hunters and anglers.

Next up were a couple of displays devoted to touring in the 1910s and ’20s, which would be considered pretty intense adventure-touring by today’s standards.

In 1914, the Model 10-F was Harley-Davidson’s flagship. It had a two-speed gearbox and a “step starter” that allowed it to be started without putting it up on its rear stand. That was a real advantage if you were in terrain where there was no firm, level spot for the stand.

While researching this exhibit, Dave found a 1914 article in H-D’s dealer magazine describing a young naturalist named Hamilton Laing, who dropped by the Juneau Avenue factory on a ride from New York City to western Canada.

“I got kind of interested and poked around a little bit more on the internet for him,” Dave told me. “Lo and behold, he became a fairly well known naturalist, worked for the British Columbia Museum, and they had all of his papers.”

Laing’s papers included a memoir of another epic ride, from Brooklyn to Oakland in 1915. Laing “talks about the motorcycle in very poetic terms,” Dave said. “There’s this great passage where a speeding car passes him in Pennsylvania, and he goes on for a few paragraphs about how the motorcycle is a superior form of transportation, if you just want to stop and smell the roses. You know, not much has changed actually in that regard.”

The British Columbia Museum noted that although Laing kept his motorcycle for several more years, he did most of his work travel in Canada by canoe. An intrepid fellow!

Another period touring display is a 1921 WJ Sport, one of Harley-Davidson’s rare boxer twin offerings. “The popularity of this machine for cross country touring is due in part to its ability to travel even a burro trail,” bragged an advertising copywriter of the time.

“We wouldn’t call this a lightweight today,” Dave said. “But it was lighter than our Big Twin. The engine was easier to work on and it got good fuel mileage.” In 1921, those were important considerations. Touring riders had to perform most of their own maintenance and repairs; gasoline was expensive and often was only available from mechanics or automobile and motorcycle dealers.

Although you can see that the WJ doesn’t have much ground clearance, it does have a forgivingly low center of gravity, which was surely a boon when picking one’s way through difficult terrain at slow speed.

The next display we looked at was devoted to purpose-built race bikes. Enthusiasts had raced H-D’s heavy big twins in tough off-road events like Michigan’s Jack Pine Enduro forever but by the mid 1950s lighter, purpose-built off-road motorcycles dominated in the dirt.

The 1958 XLCH Sportster was a true production racer, sold without lights. “In some ways you could say that this was our first real off-road motorcycle,” David noted. (The first road-going Sporty — equipped with a headlight — came the following year.)

Both the Sportster and an elegant 1972 ERS Sprint scrambler evoke an era of spare and elegant production racers like the company’s KR and XR flat track bikes. The Sprint was one of the models that emerged from H-D’s acquisition of the Aermacchi company, which happened in two stages. It purchased a half interest in the Italian firm in 1960, then AMF-Harley-Davidson purchased full control in 1974.

One thing that’s conspicuously missing from the exhibit is an Aermacchi two-stroke motocross bike. Harley-Davidson fielded a factory team in the AMA 250 cc Championship on and off between 1975 and 1979. The ’75 MX-250 was produced for one year only. It used an adapted Kayaba fork instead of rear shocks. Although it was not really a competitive motocrosser, Bruce Ogilvie won the 1975 Baja 500 on it.

In 1978, they produced another limited run of MX-250s but the chassis was instantly obsolete compared to the monoshock Yamaha YZ250. The Aermacchi motor made good power but it was peaky as hell. Harley-Davidson sold Aermacchi to the Castiglioni brothers later that year and abandoned its AMA motocross effort altogether in 1979. In spite of its checkered history, the MX-250 is a bit of a cult bike with the vintage MX crowd.

Just because you can do it doesn’t mean you should

The most compelling display may be a much abused 1985 FXRP police model. It’s hard to imagine anything further from a factory off-roader. But Charlie Peet, a Harley-Davidson enthusiast from Florida, chose that bike for his mount in the 9,000-mile Trans-Amazon Rally held in 1988.

Peet’s police bike was modified at a Ft. Lauderdale Harley dealership. They fit a larger fuel tank from a BMW, saddlebags, a skidplate, handguards, extra lights, and louder horns! It was shipped to the starting point in Cartagena, Colombia. It baffled the 170-odd other competitors. Most were two-person teams in cars or trucks; the six other motorcycles entered were all purpose-built dirt bikes.

“They voted Charlie least likely to finish because not only was he on this thing, but he didn’t have a support team,” Dave told me. “It was really dangerous. Normally with rallies, you have sweep teams; there were none. Every country handled its own leg of the rally. The maps were a mess. At one point, Charlie was riding and looking at his map, and what he thought was a road was actually the border between two provinces.”

In spite of that, he was one of four motorcyclists to reach the finish in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Harley-Davidson engineers convinced the company to acquire Peet’s FXRP so they could study it. Evidently they couldn’t believe it had finished the race either.

The FXRs were the first new models released after the management bought Harley-Davidson back from AMF. The chassis was developed with input from a young pup named Erik Buell, and there are people who claim these are the best hogs ever farrowed. Be that as it may, this 1,137 cc beast, which weighed 683 pounds, was a crazy choice for the Trans-Amazon Rally.

Into the modern era

The exhibit also includes a 2006 Buell Ulysses and Ewan McGregor’s LiveWire from the recent Long Way Up TV series.

The Ulysses, recently profiled on Common Tread, is another short-lived model that became a cult fave once it was discontinued. In this case, the whole Buell brand was killed off. It’s often seemed to me that Harley-Davidson employees dare not speak the Buell name, but perhaps the Ulysses reputation will be rehabilitated to help establish the Pan America’s bona fides.

McGregor’s LiveWire might be cool to see but next to Charlie Peet’s FXRP, McGregor and Boorman’s ride was little more than a jaunt.

All of this leads to, of course, the Pan America. Even the museum doesn’t have one of its own yet. The bike on display at the moment is a late prototype or early production model that belongs to the Parts & Accessories side of the business. They used it to test the fit of components and as a photo model.

With the exception of the Ulysses, the motorcycles on display in “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” are too old to be thought of as Pan America progenitors, so it’s up to you to decide whether the exhibit serves to bolster faith in Harley-Davidson’s ADV chops. That said, I admire The Motor Company’s sense of its own history, which obviously includes a lot of very adventurous riding that is nicely shown off in this exhibit. As I’ve come to expect from the Museum, the lighting and displays are beyond reproach.

David Kreidler scoured his employer’s extensive archives for photos, copies of old ads, and other ephemera which round out the stories of the motorcycles on display. As noted, a few models were conspicuous by their absence but it’s better to leave visitors wanting more than footsore and overwhelmed.

In addition to this week’s virtual debut of the exhibit, the museum is planning to reopen to the public on March 5 with hours of 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

Motorcycle manufacturer KTM expanding U.S. HQ in Murrieta

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by Samantha Gowen from https://www.sbsun.com

KTM, an Austrian manufacturer of street and off-road motorcycles, is expanding its North American headquarters in Murrieta to a new campus.

A groundbreaking is expected in August.

KTM NA (North America) is building its campus at the northeast corner of Winchester and Borel roads. The company, led by CEO John Hinz, says it will span 20 acres and include at least three buildings with more than 150,000 square feet of technical, office, warehouse and racing departments.

The development is one block south of KTM NA’s private motorsports facility, which is used for testing products and athlete training. It has two supercross-style dirt tracks, two extreme off-road courses and a trials competition section.

The company sells its motorcycles and related gear through independent dealers across the U.S.

We asked the company about its new HQ and what it’s bringing to the Temecula Valley. Tom Moen, KTM’s marketing manager, gave us an update.

Q: Tell us more about the KTM brand and what it makes.

A: We have three brands of motorcycles we build and distribute to our dealers, KTM, Husqvarna and GasGas. In those brands, we have an array of products from balance bikes for 3-year-old children up to 1290 Adventure motorcycles. Plus we have electric minibikes and a full-size, off-road electric bike.

We also produce and sell parts and accessories to our dealers, everything from T-shirts to full riding suits and anything for protection and safety equipment, kids to adults sizes.

Q: Where was KTM’s North American HQ previously?

A: Our headquarters was back in Amherst, Ohio. We also had sales and marketing offices down in El Cajon. We moved to Temecula in 2004 and opened our current headquarters in Murrieta in 2009, which has grown to four buildings now (and we are outgrowing them). Our Ohio offices are now the parts warehouse and dealer training center

Q: How long has the test track been operational?

A: Our private test track has been fully operational for 3 years now. It’s right above our current offices off Technology and Innovation streets, south of French Valley airport.

Q: It sounds like business is going well. Can you share more?

A: Our company has been doing very well in the off-road market for a while. This is where we lead in market share among the other brands. Our street segment has grown in the past three years, and we are/have been the largest European motorcycle manufacture in North America.

We’ve been seeing 10% average growth for the past years, and this last year was our best year retail sales-wise for our dealers.

Q: How did the pandemic impact the company?

A: COVID just made people want to get out and do things. Riding motorcycles was something you could do with yourself and your families. We were lucky that our production was down for only a month or so, but once it got going, they delivered what we had planned for the year, pre-COVID. Plus, we took some other countries’ product while they were in lockdown. There was demand and we were able to supply the product.

Q: Will KTM NA be hiring?

A: Yes, with the new HQ expansion we will be hiring more staff. It’s hard to say how many at first, but the company sees potential to increase HQ staff by 50 within the first year at the new HQ.

Q: Does the region (and a certain love for the outdoors) help KTM’s business?

A: Yes Southern Cal and the Southwest is the hot spot for offroad and all general motorcycling. We have the best weather!!

KTM has been making motorcycles and gear in the North American market since 1967. The company says it has grown its U.S. workforce, expanding to 150 employees from 30 since 2009.

EagleRider Motorcycles Pensacola celebrates 5th anniversary

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by Kalyn Wolfe from https://www.pnj.com

What is it like to be an American? Is there any truth to the negative stereotypes that surround Americans?

These are the questions Claire Coleman and her husband, Nick, asked themselves as they left New Zealand more than 10 years ago. With a pickup truck and an RV, they spent a year meandering across the lower 48, learning about American culture with every dirt road, brewery and person they encountered.

It was these experiences that inspired Claire Coleman to publish a book called “The Back Of Beyond: A North American Road Trip, Kiwi Style!” not long after. But the inspiration didn’t stop there.

“It was this trip that inspired us to move to America,” she said. “We had positive experiences with every American we met.”

The next step involved obtaining visas.

“We needed to open a business in order to fulfill our visa requirements, and Nick spent years in the oil rig industry,” Coleman said. “I haven’t worked in the oil rig industry, so we had to figure out a business we could run together. Nick has worked on motorcycles since he could walk, so in 2016 we decided to open EagleRider Motorcycles Pensacola.”

Five years and two locations later, EagleRider Motorcycles Pensacola has recently moved to its third location at 3305 North W St. and held a grand opening April 8 to mark the occasion.

But Coleman would be the first to tell you that it was a celebration that almost didn’t happen.

“COVID killed us,” she said. “Everyone was canceling. We lost all of our international customers and we had no forward bookings. The borders closed, we initially closed shop, sold up our house and most belongings and planned on returning home to New Zealand. Then we literally drove past our new building on North W Street as they were banging in the for sale sign, so our plans changed and we got ready for round two in Pensacola.”

As soon as they closed on the location in October, the couple went to work on upgrades and renovations, which included new ceiling tiles, lighting, paint and a mural of Pensacola Beach for people to take selfies.

“Our new location is triple in size,” Coleman said. “We have a bigger showroom and have added repair work to our rental program.”

EagleRider Motorcycles Pensacola offers a wide variety of adventures, from daily, weekly to monthly rentals, with seven Harley Davidson models to choose from. A 10% discount is automatically applied for groups of four or more during select seasonal months.

If you’re not sure which way to travel, the website offers a host of guided and self-guided tours for people to browse and book for inspiration.

“It’s the best form of social distancing,” Coleman said.

EagleRider Motorcycles Pensacola is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. For more information, visit eaglerider.com/pensacola or call 850-748-3423.

Harley-Davidson hit with 56% EU tariff effectively blocking it from the EU market

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by Rick Barrett from https://www.jsonline.com

Harley-Davidson hit with 56% EU tariff, an ‘unprecedented situation’ that will block the motorcycle maker from the market, CEO says

Harley-Davidson Inc. has been slapped with a 56% European Union tariff on all its motorcycles, the company said Monday, effectively blocking it from the EU market.

Harley said it would appeal the ruling scheduled to go into effect in June.

“This is an unprecedented situation and underscores the very real harm of an escalating trade war to our stakeholders on both sides of the Atlantic. The potential impact of this decision on our manufacturing operations and overall ability to compete in Europe is significant,” Jochen Zeitz, Harley chairman, president and CEO, said in a statement.

Europe is Harley’s second largest market after the United States.

“Imposing an import tariff on all Harley-Davidson motorcycles goes against all notions of free trade and, if implemented, these increased tariffs will pose a targeted competitive disadvantage for our products, against those of our European competitors,” Zeitz added.

In 2018, the European Union placed a 25% incremental tariff (31% total tariff) on motorcycles imported into the EU from the United States.

Under the latest proposal, the EU would place a 50% incremental tariff on U.S. motorcycles for a total tariff of 56%. The ruling would even apply to Harleys manufactured in Thailand, where the company had set up operations to get around the 2018 EU tariff.

Monday, Harley posted a quarterly profit of $259 million, or $1.68 a share, up from $70 million, or 45 cents a share, in the year-earlier period.

Revenue rose to $1.4 billion from $1.3 billion a year earlier.

“The actions we have taken to reshape the business are having a positive impact on our results, especially for our most important North American region,” Zeitz said.

Harley-Davidson shares closed Monday up $3.91 a share, or nearly 10%, on Monday to $44.29.

Harley-Davidson To Vigorously Defend Itself Following Aggressive EU Tariff Ruling – Quick Facts
from https://www.rttnews.com

Harley-Davidson, Inc. (HOG) announced Monday that it has received notification from the Economic Ministry of Belgium that it would be subject to the revocation of Binding Origin Information (BOI) credentials, effective April 19, 2021, following a request from the European Union (EU).

Harley-Davidson said it will be lodging an immediate legal challenge to this decision.

Since 2019, the company has operated with BOI regulatory credentials, allowing it to supply its EU markets with certain motorcycles produced at its international manufacturing facilities at tariff rates of 6%.

The EU’s new ruling will apply to the entire Harley-Davidson product portfolio and will effectively prohibit the company from functioning competitively in Europe.

From June 2021, all Harley-Davidson products, regardless of origin, will be subject to a 56% import tariff within the EU.

In 2018, the European Union placed a 25% incremental tariff (31% total tariff) on motorcycles imported into the EU from the U.S., effective June 22, 2018. The tariff is scheduled to increase to a 50% incremental tariff (56% total tariff) effective June 1, 2021.

European OEMs, including motorcycle manufacturers, will continue operations with significantly lower import tariffs to the U.S. ranging from 1.2% for up to 800cc products to 2.4% for over 800cc products, and with automobiles at 2.5%.

Harley-Davidson Hit With EU Tariff Ruling
by Alistair MacDonald from https://www.wsj.com

Motorcycle maker says ruling would subject its products to 56% import tariff within the EU.

Harley-Davidson Inc. has been hit with a European Union import ruling that the motorcycle maker says would impose an import tariff of 56% on its products and keep it from functioning competitively in Europe.

The Milwaukee-based company announced the ruling along with better-than-expected sales and profit for the first quarter, news of which lifted the stock to a new multiyear high.

Harley-Davidson has been one of the highest-profile U.S. casualties of recent trade disputes, after the EU put a 25% duty on its bikes and other U.S. goods in 2018. Those levies were a response to tariffs the Trump administration imposed on steel and aluminum from producers in Europe and elsewhere.

On Monday, Harley-Davidson said Belgium’s Economic Ministry, on behalf of the EU, had notified the company that it was revoking an agreement that allowed the business to supply Europe with certain motorcycles produced at its international manufacturing facilities at tariff rates of 6%.

Harley-Davidson said the EU ruling would apply to its entire lineup and subject all products—regardless of origin—to a 56% import tariff within the trade bloc beginning June 1.

California Highway Patrol Harley-Davidson EL Knucklehead from 1937

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

The California Highway Patrol (CHP) might very well be the most famous American state law enforcement agency. A big reason for that is the “CHiPs” TV series that ran in the 1970s and 1980s and followed the adventures of two fictional CHP officers.

Set up in 1929, the organization currently covers everything from highway patrol duties to guarding state officials. And an important element the CHP officers use in performing their duties are vehicles, most notably motorcycles.

Presently, most of the two-wheelers serving with the CHP are Harley-Davidsons, with the Electra Glide forming the backbone of the several-hundreds strong fleet since 2013. But the law enforcement agency has always had an interesting love story with the Milwaukee company, and the Knucklehead we have here is proof of that.

What you’re looking at is one of about 1,829 EL motorcycles Harley made in 1937. It was deployed since new with the CHP, and thanks to its current owner, who purchased it in 1994, it now looks pretty much as it did back in the day it served.

The motorcycle lacks police-related hardware, such as a siren, a two-way radio speaker, and of course the red and blue flashers, but it has the right colors, badge, and the 61ci Knucklehead engine in the frame.

The bike is presently part of a collection called John Bernard Estate, and was for a long time on display at various museums, including its present location, the National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa.

But hopes are it will not be so for long. It is going under the hammer at the hands of Mecum in Las Vegas at the end of the month. The two-wheeler is going with an original historical 1944 California pink slip, but no estimate on how much it is expected to fetch is given.

Meteor 350 set to arrive in North America

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METEOR 350 TO ARRIVE AT NORTH AMERICAN DEALERS

349cc single-cylinder Meteor set to arrive at dealers in May

Milwaukee, Wis (Wednesday, April 6, 2021) — The Royal Enfield Meteor 350, announced in late 2020, is set to debut at Royal Enfield dealerships across North America. Drawing on Royal Enfield’s rich history, the middleweight Meteor revives the iconic name given to its predecessor, which was released in the 1950s. The Meteor 350 pricing will begin at $4,399 for the Fireball.

The Meteor 350 is a new design built from the ground up, created by designers and engineers based at Royal Enfield’s two state-of-the-art technical centers, in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, and Bruntingthorpe, UK. With a fuel-injected 349cc air-oil-cooled single-cylinder engine, the Meteor generates 20.2 bhp and 19 lb-ft of torque at 4,000 rpm. Designed with a balancer shaft, the new platform gives a smooth and well-mannered riding experience, while retaining Royal Enfield’s “thump.” The Meteor 350 also features a twin downtube spline frame, a seat height of 30.1 inches and a curb weight of 421 pounds, making it an approachable and fun motorcycle for nearly any rider.

“The Meteor 350 is a perfect balance of fun and style for any rider,” said Breeann Poland, Marketing and Communications Lead-Americas. “Riders will have the opportunity to choose the Meteor 350 in three model trims: the Fireball, the Stellar and the Supernova, each with its own unique personality and styling. The Meteor displays Royal Enfield’s commitment to our global position as the leader in the middleweight segment, offering a diverse lineup of motorcycles to all riders.”

The Meteor 350 will be available in seven color variations. The Fireball will be available with blacked-out trim pieces and pinstripe wheels, while the Meteor 350 Stellar will offer a passenger backrest. The Supernova will offer both a windscreen and a passenger backrest. A constant-mesh five-speed gearbox and multi-plate wet clutch handle shifting duties and deliver a smooth, linear feel to the rider. The Meteor 350’s 19-inch front alloy wheel features a 100/90-19 57P CEAT tubeless tire, while the rear is equipped with a 17-inch 140/70-17 66P CEAT tubeless tire. The Meteor 350 comes standard with telescopic 41mm front forks and twin emulsion adjustable rear shocks, with six-step preload settings to adjust ride characteristics.

Making its debut on the Meteor 350 is the new TBT (Turn-By-Turn) navigation pod, known as the Royal Enfield Tripper, a navigation display device for real-time directions, built within the Google Maps Platform. The Tripper displays the best route to reach a destination using Google Maps’ navigation. Paired via the Royal Enfield App to the rider’s smartphone, the Tripper is simplicity itself, clearly and efficiently giving the required level of information whilst remaining unintrusive.

A full line of Genuine Motorcycle Accessories will be available to further customize the Meteor 350 depending on the rider’s preferences, including parts such as windscreens, backrests, larger foot pegs and more.

The Meteor 350 is set to arrive at dealerships in May. For more information, visit your local Royal Enfield dealer or www.royalenfield.com.

 

American’s Top Reason For Accessing Driving Records Is To Check A Partner’s Record

By General Posts

from https://motorcycles.einnews.com

Checking the driving records of a spouse or partner is the main reason that people have been using a leading driving records website.

Checking the driving records of a spouse or partner is the main reason that people have been using a leading driving records website.

DMV.US.org, the leading site for driving records and data, has carried out research into the main reasons that people are using the site, and checking the driving records of a partner has come out tops. Other main reasons that people are using the site include checking their own records and reconnecting with a long-lost friend.

Some more unusual responses included trying to find the father of a child, looking up the previous owner of a pet, and one person even tried to search for information on President Trump!

The top 10 list of reasons for using DMV.us.org are:

Checking a spouse or partner
2. Checking themselves
3. Reconnecting with a long lost friend or relative
4. Checking on new neighbors when moving house
5. Checking a new person in their lives – a friend or lover
6. Checking celebrities or sportspeople
7. Searching people with the same name as them
8. To track down the father of their child!
9. To find the previous owner of a pet
10. Researching the owner of land.

Using Driving Records is a great way to find out information on a variety of subjects. You can use them to search yourself to make sure that the correct information is in the public domain, to reconnect with friends you may have lost touch with, and even to look up your neighbors if you have concerns about their driving!

DMV.us.org was created to provide driving records to commuters all over the United States. The site provides an extensive database of information on driving records. The only information required is a name and location and the site can generate a report that provides all driving data available.

Millions of Americans used DMV.us.org last year to research their driving records. Compared to other driving history providers, the site’s database supplies more information than just speeding offenses. DMV.us.org offers a comprehensive driving report for each customer that covers name, address, incarceration records, suspensions or revocations, and more!

For more information, please visit www.dmv.us.org or call customer support on 1-855-482-6235

Yamaha Delivers Essential Support to American Public Lands for Outdoor Recreation

By General Posts

from https://motorcycles.einnews.com

Outdoor Access Initiative Contributes Over $350,000 to Land Conservancy in 2020

Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, today announces the completion of the 2020 Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative (OAI) grant cycle with funding decisions for the fourth quarter. In total, Yamaha granted more than $350,000 in 2020 while supplying essential support to public lands providing vital access to outdoor recreation across the country. The Yamaha OAI program continues to lead the powersports industry in providing direct monetary support to grassroots efforts helping to protect, expand, and improve entry to public spaces off-road for motorized recreation.

“The pressure on public lands during the pandemic has been enormous due to people finding solace outdoors. Their adventures gave off-road enthusiasts a much-needed breather from the stress we’ve all experienced over the past year,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports marketing manager. “Public land belongs to everyone and we all have a responsibility to take care of it. Yamaha is proud to continue supporting our riders’ favorite outdoor activities, including OHV riding, hunting, camping and fishing, through the Outdoor Access Initiative.”

The fourth quarter 2020 Yamaha OAI grants totaling more than $90,000 were awarded to the following organizations:

Blue Ribbon Coalition – Pocatello, ID
East Branch Sno-Rovers & ATV Club – Medway, Maine
Idaho Single Track Alliance – Idaho Falls, ID
Reno Area Dirtriders – Reno, NV
Swampsiders Snowmobile Club – Bigfork, MN

“The need for funding and leadership for public lands increased exponentially in 2020 with more people engaging in outdoor recreation at the same time resources were being restricted. It was a relief to know we could reach out to Yamaha to help,” said Ben Burr from the Blue Ribbon Coalition, which received $11,740 to develop a trail guide for Utah’s San Rafael Desert area to help visitors explore safely and responsibly. “The Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative is a trusted resource for the outdoor recreation community with a history of putting the funds where they are needed to make big improvements on the ground.”

“The 2020 fourth quarter grant projects spanned the spectrum of powersports, with funds going to groups from all categories of Yamaha’s off-highway vehicles: Motorcycles, ATVs, Side-by-Sides, and snowmobiles,” continued Nessl. “We prioritize those projects meeting the needs of diverse OHV riders to support their local riding communities.”

For more than 12 years, Yamaha has issued quarterly grants to non-profit organizations supporting the needs of riding groups, outdoor enthusiasts, land stewardship organizations, and public land managers to improve access to public land for outdoor recreation. Since inception, Yamaha contributed over $4.5 million in aid to more than 380 projects across the nation.

The deadline for submission to the second quarter 2021 funding cycle for the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative is June 30, 2021, and applications must be postmarked by then. Submission guidelines and applications are available at YamahaOAI.com. Connect with Yamaha on social media via @YamahaOutdoors or search any of the following hashtags on all platforms: #Yamaha #YamahaOAI #REALizeYourAdventure #ProvenOffRoad

See Website at https://yamahaoai.com/