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BMW F900 R review: Nothing like a naked roadster on a freezing day

By | General Posts

by Geoff Hill from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Starring in his own remake of Freezy Rider, our man Hill tackles the elements to see if the Beemer has what it takes in the tough middleweight sector and finds it’s close, but not quite a cigar

It was freezing, raining and blowing a gale – and I was on a bike with zero miles and new tyres.

Perfect conditions, then, for pushing the limits of the Bavarian firm’s naked roadster whose mission, should it choose to accept it, was to give a good spanking to Triumph’s new Tiger 900 and the established and very popular Yamaha MT-09.

“Mmmm. I’d start in Rain mode if I was you,” said Ian at the dealership, slapping me cheerily on the back and going back to his nice warm office, the swine.

Oh well, I was obviously being punished after getting home from back to back launches in southern Spain and Morocco, and at least first impressions of the Beemer were good – compact but comfortable riding position, tilting you forward in a mildly sporty fashion on to the bars to give you a view of decent mirrors and a fairly simple but informative TFT screen.

A quick toggle of the Mode button through Road, Dynamic and Dynamic Pro into Rain, another toggle of the Electronic Suspension Adjustment to solo rider with luggage to take account of the fact that I’m heavier than the average ride, three presses of the heated grips button to get them up to the maximum setting – and I was off.

The fuelling at low revs was slightly snatchy and acceleration in Rain mode was a stately affair, and was never going to set my pants on fire, particularly since they were now soggy anyway.

Why BMW designs very expensive suits with the waterproof lining on the inside is a mystery to me. I wore one for a round-the-world trip and, in heavy rain, everything in the outside pockets got soaked.

Anyway, where was I? Ah yes, on the F900 R in the rain.

Good points so far – the quickshifter on the SE model I was riding was perfect, snicking seamlessly through the six-speed box both up and down, and handling was light and neutral, although I was still taking it relatively gently on those shiny new tyres, even though with traction control, I was unlikely to come a serious cropper.

With Brembos and big twin discs up front, stopping was linear and progressive, with cornering ABS on the SE model to give me a nice warm feeling of safety.

Oh, wait, that nice warm feeling wasn’t the ABS – it was the heated grips, which were so good that even in the sub-zero temperatures, my pinkies were in danger of bursting into flames and I had to wind them back to the 2 setting.

Right, that was it – I was bored with Rain mode, and the roads were drying out a bit anyway, so it was toggle time again, to Road mode, and while I was at, changing the suspension mode from Road to Dynamic.

That was more like it – progress became satisfyingly swift, accompanied by a meaty rasp from the exhaust and, with the bike hunkered down and firmed up, it flung itself into corners with a nice combination of enthusiasm and precision.

Things got even better in Dynamic mode and I think once the tyres were scrubbed in, I’d leave it in that all the time and use Road if it was raining.

On the base model, you only get Rain and Road riding modes, sadly, and no Electronic Suspension Adjustment.

The verdict? The Yamaha MT-09 is more powerful and aggressive, but the BMW makes peak power and torque at lower revs. It’s also cheaper and has more tech, including the electronically adjustable suspension, which makes it more user-friendly and a slightly plusher ride, and with BMW luggage attached, more suitable for touring.

5-BALL RACING SALT TORPEDO TEST AND CRASH

By | General Posts

 

We had a tough day today. The weather was clear and the roads around the Port of Los Angeles empty as we rolled the Salt Torpedo out of the shop.

 

I was supposed to be a final test run to determine whether the ignition stumble we discovered in the desert was remedied. We had also experienced a slight shimmy in the handling, so I added more rake for more stability.

Today before taking it off the lift we needed to adjust the toe-in and we did. With everything tightened we were ready for a final test run before installing the painted body work and preparations to haul ass to Bonneville. All seemed to be good to go as the Torpedo fired to life and Micah dropped the clutch.

 

He recently discovered that he had another son, Eddie, who runs E2 Metal Works in Bakersfield, with his wife, Emilia. His business is all about CNC Plasma Metal Design and fabrication. Today, Micah arrived with his new son Eddie and his pal, Mike. We immediately set to work prepping for a pass down the street, which has its pitfalls.

 

 

It’s a city street complete with cops, and we aren’t prepped for papers, plates or registration. The torpedo has no lights, no turn-signals, you name it. But since the virus has attacked our lives, the streets were void of traffic, especially on a Sunday as I asked Micah to take it easy and test the handling first.

There’s something about the Salt Torpedo that brings out the speed in a man. As soon as he caught a gear he nailed it and felt the rear tire break loose as it acted like a rocket ship that wants to fly into the next atmosphere. Unfortunately that didn’t happen today. He reached the second block at about 80 and attempted to turn.

This puppy was designed to go straight, and I had added more rake to the dragster front end, almost 15 degrees. It wanted to go straight in the worst way. We’re not sure what happened, but he hit a curb and it flipped the torpedo. He was unhurt, but we lost the front axle and perhaps both front wheels. We’ll bring you a full report in the very near future.–Bandit

 

BMW’s i4 Electric Concept Comes With a Hans Zimmer Score

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Composer Hans Zimmer (right) and his collaborator, BMW sound designer Renzo Vitale, are creating new sounds for the German automaker’s coming wave of electric cars.

 

by Brett Berk from https://www.wired.com

To fill the aural vacuum left by the disappearance of the engine, BMW brought in a ringer.

Thelma & Louise. Rain Man. The Lion King. True Romance. Interstellar. Dunkirk. Each film works to take its viewers on an emotional journey, and each leans on a shared tool: a Hans Zimmer score that serves as a guide, signaling joy, grief, conflict, passion, and more in turn. Now, though, the Oscar-winning composer has turned his talents away from the silver screen and toward the windscreen, where he’s found a new vehicle that could use a touch of emotional direction: the electric car.

Along with more than 500 horsepower and a range of 370 miles, BMW’s all-electric Concept i4 comes with music by Zimmer. These mini scores, which BMW calls “sound worlds,” will ripple out their smoothly vibrant vibrato—think Lionel Hampton on the theremin—when the doors open, as the car starts up, and as the car drives along the road.

On the i4, a concept four-door coupe BMW unveiled earlier this month, the composition morphs slightly based the car’s current driving modes, whether “core,” “sport,” or “efficient.” Zimmer and his collaborator, BMW sound designer Renzo Vitale, call the i4’s soundtrack “Limen,” the word for the threshold below which a stimuli can’t be perceived. It’s all about connecting sound to an emotional experience, which in this case happens to be driving on battery power instead of watching Rafiki hoist Simba into the air.

“We are at a moment in time, with electric cars, when we get to change the whole sonic landscape of everything in a vehicle,” Zimmer says. “We can allow the interiors of cars to set moods and give people an experience, to let people devise their own experience, not be forced into the rumbling of a petrol engine anymore.”

Zimmer’s BMW sound worlds are in concept form now, but the company intends to roll them out over the next few years on more than two dozen electric vehicles. That will start with the production version of the i4, later in 2021.

The key here is that by replacing a rumbling engine with a silent battery and whirring motors, BMW and every other automaker are ditching the sonic experience that has been part of the automobile for more than a century. Car lovers may miss the angry sewing machine clack of a Porsche 911’s flat-six, the throaty grumble and whine of a supercharged Dodge Hemi V8, or the cranial wail of a Ferrari V-12. So might unsuspecting new EV buyers. Without the rumpus of an internal combustion engine, wind roar and tire slap sound all the louder. Zimmer and Vitale strive not just to mask those perturbances but to add delight and uplift to the driving experience.

“Think about your morning, where you have to go and start your car and go to your job,” Zimmer says. “Wouldn’t it be nice if the starting sound was something beautiful, something that put a smile on your face, something that makes your day better?”

The score does sound energizing and engaging, especially in the symphonically crescendoing “sport” mode. It definitely doesn’t sound “rumbling.” But it has some additional, and perhaps questionable, 1970s sci-fi movie overtones.

“There’s this idea that all battery electric cars should sound like a spaceship,” says Jonathan Price, senior research and development manager for Harman, a sound engineering firm that supplies the automotive industry with stereo systems, speakers, noise-cancellation equipment, and electric vehicle soundtracks–both internal and external. “Unfortunately, we don’t know what a spaceship sounds like, right? None of us have ever heard a spaceship before.”

Price is working with consumers as well as client automakers to create a relevant vocabulary for the sounds they will soon be adding to the interiors and—as regulation requires—exteriors of electric vehicles. Following recent research, his team came up with 40 different terms ranging from, as Price says, “something really progressive and futuristic—the pulsing, the whirring, the droning—all the way up to something more aggressive.”

The goal here is not just to update our terminology for car sounds, but to assist with their identification and branding. And there, Price’s work aligns with Zimmer’s. The composer’s parents always drove BMWs, and he could pick out the unique tone of their Bimmer from the balcony. “When I heard that sound,” he says, “everything was fine. Safety. Mom and Dad were home.”

Likewise, contemporary carmakers want to create soundtracks that will help people identify, and identify with, their vehicles. And because this sound is no longer tied to a physical source, like an engine, the potential choices are boundless. Which presents automakers with a new kind of quandary.

“Everybody wants to have something iconic,” Price says, pointing to how Harley Davidson attempted to patent the sound of its motorcycles’ exhaust note. So he wants his team to create the tones that will distinguish a Ford EV from a Hyundai EV. “These need to not only be very unique sounds, they need to be pleasing,” Price says. “Almost like a piece of jewelry that you wear and you hope other people envy.”

Maybe you’re wondering if all of this runs counter to one of the core promises of electric cars, the luxury of silence at speed. But Zimmer argues that for many, silence is unnerving, especially at speed. It can feel uncanny, unmoored from the physical processes that provide acceleration. When Zimmer scored Interstellar, he played on that feeling to convey the awe of rocket travel. The blastoff was the loudest moment of the film, and he blew out a few speaker systems before getting it right. But then the score goes silent. “That’s when everything was at astronomical speeds,” Zimmer says.

In any case, people aren’t seeking total silence. As automakers got better at isolating their customers from engine noise with better insulation, double-paned windows, and active noise cancellation, some customers complained. So manufacturers started piping engine noise into the cabin. BMW went further, playing artificial tunes through the stereo system. Some of this desire for sound at speed, or sound correlated to speed, may be out of habit, a generational quest for the familiar, the way that the keyboards on smart phones still make typing noises, or the cameras on smart phones still make shutter clicks. Zimmer thinks that this may vanish over time. “I think it’s sort of important to leave nostalgia behind,” he says.

Then he reconsiders. “As I said that, I suddenly remembered that every sci-fi movie we have ever seen is incredibly nostalgic.” He points to Blade Runner and Interstellar. Perhaps our dreams of the future are always enmeshed with our fantasies of the past. And our dream cars will always sound like the vehicles from our outmoded idea of the future, like something out of The Jetsons, because that’s what reassures us.

Zimmer sees his automotive work as fostering the way a car catalyzes this kind of big-picture thinking. “A car is such a great place to think, it’s such a great place to dream and have your own thoughts,” he says. “The car is the perfect private place to have constantly great ideas.”

Forget Coronavirus…We got BELTS!!

By | General Posts

 

Having trouble finding the belt you want or need? Tired of playing “search the web”?

APM has Primary Drive Belts in 8, 11, and 14mm, Kevlar of Glass, with all the impossible-to-get belts that no one else seems to have. APM has Final Drive Belts in 24mm, 1.125″, & 1.50″ wide with Carbon Fiber Cord which is stronger then steel, and in a myriad of different tooth counts. If we ain’t got it, then maybe it hasn’t been made yet?

Look no further my good friends. APM has the Belts, and not just any belts, but the original manufacturer of the OE belts, Gates Rubber.

Here are a few examples, but visit our web site for all the sizes available…
www.americanprimemfginc.com

8205 Secura Way
Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
(562) 321-1989
info@apminc.us

Hours
Monday—Friday: 8:00AM–5:30PM
Saturday & Sunday: CLOSED

This motorcycle was strong and reliable under all military conditions.

By | General Posts

1939 BMW R12 Military

The BMW R12 together with the later R75 epitomize the World War II military motorcycle celebrated by Hollywood and the popular press. Heavy but tough, fast enough, and essentially bullet proof.

From its beginning in 1935 to the R-12’s demise in 1942, BMW built nearly 30,000 R12s. The majority were civilian models conscripted in 1939 with another 10,000 units specially built for the Wehrmacht police and combat units. As an early adopter of electric arc welding, BMW was able to speed up considerably the manufacturing process – particularly welding frames – and the company never looked back. As it happens, the R12 was their most prolific…

See and read more at the National Motorcycle Museum Web Site. Hell, you can see it when the virus threat passes in the museum. I got a kick out of it, because I created a seat suspension similar on my goofy ’69 Panhead.–Bandit

Direct from the White House

By | General Posts
Trump Signs $2 Trillion Coronavirus Stimulus Bill
-NBC News
“President Donald Trump on Friday signed the $2 trillion coronavirus economic stimulus bill, putting in motion desperately needed financial relief for millions of Americans set back by the pandemic. Trump signed the bill just hours after the House passed it with a bipartisan vote,” Rebecca Shabad reports.
Apple Works with White House to Release ‘COVID-19’ App, Website
-Reuters
“Apple Inc and the White House said on Friday that the iPhone maker worked with the Trump administration and federal agencies to release an app and website that will direct users to guidance from the Centers for Disease Control on the disease caused by the coronavirus,” Steve Holland reports. Learn more about the screening tool here.
Selfless Acts: How Americans are Helping Each Other Through the Coronavirus
-The Hill
“People across the United States are taking steps to help one another amid the coronavirus pandemic. From companies donating masks and ventilators to hospitals, to everyday people helping their neighbors, there are countless examples of people trying to do the right thing during an extraordinarily difficult time,” The Hill reports.

J&P LowRider Giveaway!

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RIDING FREE FROM DC:

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Your Weekly Biker Bulletin from Inside the Beltway

Your Motorcycle Riders Foundation team in Washington, D.C. is pleased to provide our members with the latest information and updates on issues that impact the freedom and safety of American street motorcyclists. Count on your MRF to keep you informed about a range of matters that are critical to the advancement of motorcycling and its associated lifestyle. Published weekly when the U.S. Congress is in session.

Idaho Makes 4

Last week, the Idaho House of Representatives joined their Senate colleagues by passing S. 1292, the motorcyclist profiling bill in the state. When the governor signs the bill, Idaho will officially become the 4thstate in the nation with a law on the books regarding motorcyclist profiling.

The MRF wants to congratulate not only the riders in Idaho but the tireless advocates who have fought this battle for several years. After a razor-thin defeat in previous legislative years, the folks in Idaho never gave up and were rewarded with this monumental victory.

We would like to note that Idaho’s success demonstrates that this is a nonpartisan issue. Two states that are usually thought of as “Blue States” (Washington and Maryland) and two states traditionally thought of as “Red States” (Louisiana and Idaho) are now on the record on the topic.

Congratulations again on a hard-fought and well-deserved victory!

Click here to read a news story about the victory in Idaho.

You can read the Idaho profiling legislation here.

Momentum for Infrastructure Bills?

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), sending the massive stimulus legislation to the President’s desk to be signed into law. The $2 trillion coronavirus response bill is the third aid package from Congress is meant to keep businesses and individuals afloat during an unprecedented freeze on the majority of American life.  For a variety of reasons, we believe there will likely be more stimulus legislation in the future, and infrastructure investment may be a central component of additional efforts to recover the economy and get people back to work.

Without a doubt, proposals for including sizable infrastructure spending in coronavirus response/economic stimulus bills will receive bipartisan support. There is a strong economic and fiscal basis for stimulus spending on roads, bridges, transit, etc. Infrastructure spending has a high multiplier effect, adding indirect economic value beyond the immediate investment in construction companies and related contractors or materials suppliers. A dollar spent on infrastructure can go further than many other forms of stimulus. State and local governments are also already facing declining revenues due to quarantines, diminished economic activity, and new public health expenditures. Many state constitutions prevent deficit spending, so absent new taxes – an unlikely scenario – they will be stymied in making new investments in stimulus-type programs, such as infrastructure, and may even have to curtail current road-building budgets.

Beyond the scope of infrastructure investment, funding will likely be front-loaded, rather than a typical year-over-year spread.  The stimulus of 2009 focused on ‘shovel ready’ projects, which resulted in lots of repaving and maintenance versus large new projects, a similar focus on near-term efforts to quickly create jobs is foreseeable.

We at the MRF will continue to advocate for the priorities of motorcyclists in an infrastructure bill. We will also rely on you to help push your elected officials into remembering motorcyclists when passing these massive legislative packages.

Motorcycle Community Rallies to aid in COVID-19 Relief Around the World

As the COVID-19 National Emergency dominates your daily newsfeed, I wanted to take a moment to share a couple of positive stories of the motorcycle community stepping up to aid in relief efforts. The first story comes out of NYC were a group of riders started Masks for Docs to help get personal protection equipment (PPE) in the hands of our healthcare workers facing a critical supply shortage.  You can read the full news story featured in Vice News here. The second article highlights motorcycle manufacturers and a tire manufacturer donating PPE’s, medical supplies, and ventilators to aid in the critical supply shortage. The story also features a few groups in other countries, helping those in quarantine by delivery prescriptions and meals to the elderly in their community. You can read more about those efforts by clicking here.

As schools around the country have shuttered, MRF Vice President Jay Jackson has been volunteering in his own local community in Indiana to hand out bagged meals for students. You can read that story here.

Bikers are some of the best people that I know. The D.C. team is hunkered down and working from home as Congress is closed to the public through March 31st.  We will continue to review the massive legislation passed this week and plan to share more of the details with you next week.

About Motorcycle Riders Foundation
The Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) provides leadership at the federal level for states’ motorcyclists’ rights organizations as well as motorcycle clubs and individual riders. The MRF is chiefly concerned with issues at the national and international levels that impact the freedom and safety of American street motorcyclists. The MRF is committed to being a national advocate for the advancement of motorcycling and its associated lifestyle and works in conjunction with its partners to help educate elected officials and policymakers in Washington and beyond.

2020 Honda CBR250RR Details Revealed

By | General Posts

by Satya Singh from https://www.rushlane.com

The high-performance, fully faired quarter-litre bike was launched last year and it is on sale in many international markets including Japan and Indonesia. In its 2020 avatar, the bike gets a new colour option and some mechanical upgrades. Updated Honda CBR250RR borrows some of its styling from its bigger siblings, the CBR650R and CBR1000RR. There’s a new colour option – Grand Prix Red with Pearl Glare White. This variant comes with gold-plated rims and forks, which create an exciting contrast with the red and white colour scheme.

Apart from these, there aren’t any major cosmetic changes in the updated bike. It continues with its aggressive profile, as accentuated by dual LED headlamp, LED position lights, sculpted side cowl, sleek side panels, low-set handlebars, and muscular fuel tank.

2020 Honda CBR250RR was scheduled to be unveiled at Osaka Motorcycle show and Tokyo Motorcycle Show, but these have been cancelled due to coronavirus. Subsequently, Honda decided to unveil 2020 CBR250RR at Honda Virtual Motorcycle Show. Along with CBR250RR, other Honda bikes such as CT125 Hunter Cub and CBR1000RR-R Fireblade will also be unveiled at the virtual event.

Features that have been continued from the earlier model include fully-digital instrument cluster, double-barrel exhaust and petal disc brakes. Updated CBR250RR is powered by a new 250cc twin-cylinder, liquid cooled engine that generates max power of 41 ps. This is around three units more than the earlier model. Torque output is also expected to go up, even though exact numbers have not been revealed yet. For records, torque produced by earlier model was 23.3 Nm at 11,000 rpm. Engine is mated to a 6-speed transmission.

Coming to mechanicals, one key upgrade is the addition of slipper clutch. This was not available in the earlier variant. However, based on customer feedback, Honda has introduced the slipper clutch as a standard feature in new CBR250RR. Honda will continue to offer bi-directional quickshifter system as an option. CBR250RR is already equipped with ride-by-wire throttle system. Users will be able to choose from three riding modes of Comfort, Sport, and Sport+.

New CBR250RR will sport a price tag of 847,000 yen, which is around Rs 5.78 lakh. It will rival the likes of Kawasaki Ninja ZX-25R. In the Indian market, Honda sells CBR250R, which will be discontinued after BS6 emission norms come into effect from March 31. CBR250RR is unlikely to be launched in India, owing to its high pricing. In case it is launched in India, CBR250RR will emerge a formidable competitor to the likes of Kawasaki Ninja 400.

Copyright (C) https://www.rushlane.com.

Very Famous Harley-Davidson Riders You Probably Didn’t Know About

By | General Posts

by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com/

Because they’re rich and famous, artists have access to some of the newest and most awesome rides, whether they’re cars, motorcycles, bikes or anything in between. Some they buy, some they get to try out and keep, as long as they can guarantee exposure to the brand.

Artists and celebrities are also influencers, in that they can sway public opinion towards a certain product. Sometimes, their choices are very personal and don’t have a financial goal in sight – and this seems to be the case with the three celebrities we’re going to discuss today. Call them closeted Harley riders and you wouldn’t be completely off the mark.

Given the boom in paparazzi media over the past decade and the way artists (be they actors, musicians or Internet celebrities) have been using it to further their careers, the realization that there are stars who fly under the radar comes across as strange. This allows them to harbor and feed their true passions and, for these three, those passions include riding Harley-Davidson.

Jim Carrey

Think of male celebrities riding Harleys (or any other motorcycle, for that matter) and images of Brad Pitt, George Clooney, Justin Timberlake, Keanu Reeves, David Beckham and Jason Momoa pop into your mind. They are, if you think about it, all men’s men: buff, tough, rough and, because of it, a perfect fit on a Hog.

As it turns out, so is Jim Carrey. In the early 2000s, the comedian treated himself to a custom Harley-Davidson Road King Classic, surprising even his loyal fans with his choice. After all, Carrey is known for a lot of stuff, but being the “Harley type” isn’t exactly one of them. He’s more the goofy, silly, occasionally artsy type.

Always the funny guy, though, Carrey brought his trademark humor to the Hog, according to an urban legend. Apparently, thinking it would be hilarious if he could somehow “prank” cops, he got the vanity license plate “NO TAG” for his Harley, but the idea backfired.

“No tag” is what traffic police officers write in the license plate number slot of a vehicle with no license plate during a traffic stop. Because that was Carrey’s actual plate, countless traffic tickets ended up being routed back to him.

There’s no actual evidence Carrey confirmed the report, but such an occurrence can happen. As one hacker proved at DefCon 2019, you get the same result if you try to “trick” the DMV by getting the “NULL” license plate. In short, it’s not a good idea.

Cher

Cher has always been a tough babe with an image to match, but unlike younger stars with a rock ‘n’ roll or edgier image, in her case, it’s actually grounded in reality. Cher was a longtime Harley-Davidson rider and would often use her passion and her fame to highlight charitable causes close to heart.

Younger audiences today probably don’t know about it because, well, they’re young and Cher is not anymore – even though you wouldn’t be able to say by looking at her.

Back in the ‘90s and early 2000s, the singer owned a 1994 Fat Boy, which she would often ride at Harley gatherings, all types of parades or charity events. For instance, in 1994, she made an appearance at the Happy Harley Days at Streets in Beverly Hills, California. Then, in 2003, she rode it again to New York’s City Hall on Ride To Work Day, together with other stars like Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Peter Fonda and Hulk Hogan.

By some accounts, Cher sold her bike in 2003, but the love for the spirit of Harley never died. In 2013, for example, she showed up for a live performance on The Today Show on the back of a NYPD bike – and with a full NYPD bike escort.

Elizabeth Taylor

Liz is the most surprising Harley rider on this short list. The screen icon, famous for her mermerizing eyes, adventurous love life and, last but not least, a completely uncensored love of diamonds, is the least likely match for the “biker type.” Yet, she owned a Harley, loved it and rode it for quite some time.

In September 1987, Taylor was presented with a very unique gift by her good friend and occasional lover, magazine publisher and bike collector Malcolm Forbes: a custom 1988 Harley-Davidson 883 “Hugger” she named Purple Passion. Purple, as you may have heard, was Liz’s favorite color.

Forbes had his own motorcycle club, the Capitalist Tools, and Taylor would often go on rides with them. When she got the Harley, she’d been taking riding lessons for a few weeks, so her first ride was on the back, with Forbes in the front. After that first experience, she described her new bike as “super.”

As a welcome into the small community, Forbes also gave Taylor a biker ring and she got fake tattoos on her arms. She presented him with a silver ring – a helmeted skull with ruby eyes – as a thank-you. Photographic evidence shows Taylor continued to ride for years after that, so unlike her lovers, the Harley didn’t bore her right away.