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Ujjwal Dey

China-made Brixton 1200 cleared for production

By | General Posts

by Pradeep Shah from https://www.financialexpress.com

China-made Brixton 1200 cleared for production: 1200cc modern classic has Bonneville T120 in its sights!

About the new 1200cc model, Brixton says that it “shows the way of Brixton Motorcycles into even higher capacity classes and proves the development competence of our brand.”

Brixton 1200 – a 1200cc modern classic has been cleared to enter production as per a report on Bennetts. The modern classic will lock horns against the likes of the Triumph Bonneville T120 in the segment. Showcased as a concept at 2019 EICMA motorcycle show, the said model will be made in China. However, Brixton comes under the KSR Group from Austria that is responsible for importing motorcycles from multiple Chinese manufacturers. The design and engineering part for the Brixton 1200 has been taken care of at KSR’s design center that is located in Krups, Austria. The Brixton will most likely draw power from a 1200cc, parallel-twin engine that will put itself very much in the Bonneville T120 territory. In terms of aesthetics, the Brixton 1200 looks like a proper modern classic with an all-LED rounded headlamp upfront, wired wheels, all-black theme and touches of chrome just at the right places.

About the new 1200cc model, Brixton says that it “shows the way of Brixton Motorcycles into even higher capacity classes and proves the development competence of our brand.” As of now, the exact timeline for the production of Brixton 1200 isn’t clear and the company says that it wants to create a technically mature vehicle without time pressure, a vehicle that meets more than just the high-quality requirements in these cubic capacity classes.

Apart from showcasing the Brixton 1200, the company launched Crossfire 500 and Crossfire 500X last year. The two get power from a 486 cc, parallel-twin motor good for churning out 47 bhp of power. The said models entered production soon after they were showcased as concepts and the same can be expected from the Brixton 1200 as well. More details on the Brixton 1200 expected soon, so stay tuned for all the updates!

Also, will the Brixton 1200 be able to give a tough fight to the Triumph Bonneville 120?

New Flat Out Leather Vest from 5-Ball Racing

By | General Posts

We’ve developed this from a notion by Jeremiah Soto. After awhile, we discovered several improvements and went to work on manufacturing a new model.

This puppy is too cool with comfortable invisible hand pockets in the front, traditional western leather chest pockets with snaps. Two deep gun, phone or camera pockets on the inside and out official, exclusive media pocket in the back. And the price is right.

–Bandit

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The Bright Light Bikernet Weekly News for April 23, 2020

By | General Posts

It’s just life and it’s inspirational the Human Spirit
By Bandit, Rogue Wayfarer, Barry Green, Bob T., Sam Burns, the Redhead, Laura, Andreas, Gearhead and the rest of the crew#

Hey,

I love all the doom and gloom, the blame and the conspiracy theories. As you will see, Joe Smith sent us some damn interesting images from the Spanish Flu era in 1918 that killed 500,000. We survived to have an economic collapse in 1929. There’s never a dull moment in life. The light at the end of the tunnel is bright!

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Americade sets July date for 2020 motorcycle rally

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by Jay Petrequin from https://www.news10.com

LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The 2020 Americade motorcycle rally, a yearly staple event for the village, announced Wednesday that they would be moving their date for the year back by a couple months as a response to COVID-19.

The event, originally set for June, is now being planned for July 21-25.

“The health of our community and our guests is paramount, but it is our sincere hope that by late July, it will be possible to bring Americade back to Lake George as long as there are no federal, state or local regulations that would preclude it,” wrote Americade organizer Christian  Dutcher in a news release. “We will be very sensitive to public health concerns. We will conduct Americade 2020 in a manner that is respectful of the terrible ordeal this pandemic has caused.’’

In addition, this year’s Americade will employ a variety of safety procedures in order to ensure safety in the event that coronavirus fears are still active in the region. This year, the motorcycle event is going “touchless.”

In accordance with guidance from Warren County, Americade will be enforcing a restricted number of attendees in a given space; removing certain events based on usual crowd size; asking attendees to register online instead of in-person; facilitate unguided rides; and encourage riders to use a variety of local restaurants for lunches while riding, in order to avoid anywhere being inundated by crowds.

‘’Americade’s decision to postpone rather than cancel is a welcome decision for our region’s economy,” wrote Lake George Mayor Robert Blais. “Our great family resort has the ability to host a wide variety of events successfully and cooperatively. We look forward to working with Americade and blending them into our busy season.”

Americade is also reaching out to hotels and other hospitality partners to make sure enough accomodations will be availible to bikers in town for the event.

“My Dad founded this event, and my Mom gave it its patriotic name,” Dutcher wrote. “As a family, we’ve seen it as a celebration of the American spirit of freedom and independence. This year we will pay tribute to the heroic work of our local first responders and frontline hospital workers and, in their honor, organize a special fund-raising effort among our visitors, vendors and participants.”

Seattle’s motorcycle clubs ride free (but socially distanced)

By | General Posts

Nick “Double Tap” Ziehe of Cretin Motorcycle Club stands for a portrait at the crew’s clubhouse in Seattle’s Interbay neighborhood, April 20, 2020.

by Agueda Pacheco Flores from https://crosscut.com

Coronavirus has scooter, moped and motorcycle enthusiasts rolling with caution.

Long before he was president of the Cretins Motorcycle Club, Nick Ziehe was just a kid growing up in Renton, fascinated by his dad doing a complete overhaul of a Honda CB350.

The bike was a vintage racer, but one his father heavily modified. Ziehe recalls his dad plopping him on the seat of this “odd” looking bike for short rides on backroads around Lake Washington. In high school, when his friends were getting their first cars, Ziehe got his first bike, which he rebuilt with his dad.

Today, Ziehe, 48, works at Boeing as a manufacturing engineer, and for the past five years has led the Ballard-based Cretins Motorcycle Club (aka Cretins MC Seattle), which he joined 10 years ago. Among members, Ziehe is known as “Double Tap.” The club’s preferred bikes are vintage cafe racers, with an aesthetic hearkening to 1960s London.

The glue that holds the Cretins together is the love of riding. Spring usually marks the beginning of the riding season, when members take group rides and share the feeling of the road rolling out under their feet. But this spring is different.

The global coronavirus pandemic put the group’s planned March 28 spring opener ride on hold. The annual Taco Dash (a fundraiser involving minibikes, silly games and homemade tacos) scheduled for May 2, is up in the air. And the customary, rain or shine, Thursday night dive bar meet-ups (Cretin Nights) have gone virtual, from vroom-vroom to Zoom.

Washington is home to an abundance of motorcycle, moped and scooter clubs. In addition to the Cretins there are dozens of groups, including Jewish riding club The Tribe, the Moped Army’s Seattle branch, Los Gatos Gordos and women-only riding groups. According to the Washington Traffic Safety Commision, as of last year there were 237,976 registered motorcycles (this includes mopeds and scooters) in Washington, accounting for 3% of all vehicles registered in the state. Additionally, there are 429,238 people licensed to drive motorcycles.

For many, the longer, warmer days of spring signal a return to the road. Bikers start rolling motorcycles out of garages, and groups convene for scenic rides along highways lined with pines and miles of ocean coast. But Gov. Jay Inslee did not include motorcycle rides on the list of acceptable public activities during the coronavirus stay-at-home order.

“It’s not legally prohibited, but it’s a terrible idea at the moment,” Mike Faulk, Inslee’s press secretary, says by email. “People should limit travel to limit exposure and transmission. This is a legitimate crisis. Adventure can wait.”

Despite the rebellious reputation of motorcycle riders, the Cretins aren’t rule breakers.

“The motorcycle thing is obviously kind of a sticking point for us because we can’t go and ride together,” Ziehe says. “At the same time it’s the human aspect…. I want to make sure that my buddy is good and everything is copacetic. But I can do that online.”

While group rides are off the table, for now, Ziehe and other members still go out for solo rides along desolate stretches of roads to avoid people and practice social distancing as much as they can. A bonus: With traffic significantly down, the roads are more wide open than ever.

“It’s easy for me to hit a backroad and just get lost,” says Ziehe, who now lives in Maple Valley. “Riding a motorcycle is so therapeutic — it’s not like driving a car.”

For bikers, going on rides offers a kind of solitude that people who are socially distancing might not be able to achieve while visiting a park and working hard to stay 6 feet away from the dozens of other people trying to grab their own bit of sunshine.

“You got the wind blowing across you, and you can relax and take everything in,” Ziehe says. “It’s a good way to de-stress from everything that’s going on around you.”

But some bikers are rebels with a cause.

Last week, Doug Davis, president of local Jewish motorcycle club, The Tribe, rode with a small caravan of eight people from Bellevue to Anacortes.

“The truth of the matter is because everybody is homebound and we have a lot of retired and semiretired people, we are riding much more,” says Davis, 66. “If you ask most of us what the number one thing they want to be doing, it’s usually going to be motorcycle riding. You’re out on the road — just you and nature.”

Not all members of The Tribe have chosen to go on rides. But a subgroup of the Bellevue-based posse of mostly 60-somethings have gone out at least twice a week for the past five weeks. And while the group of riders, who primarily own Harley Davidsons, are in an age group that’s considered more vulnerable to coronavirus, Davis says they’re doing everything they can to stay safe.

By Washington state law, motorcyclists are required to wear helmets, which can range from half helmets to full head coverage. Some helmets have face shields; riders in The Tribe who don’t have a face shield wear cloth face masks. (As is customary in biker culture, they also wear leather gloves.) They stay 6 feet apart while on their feet and when out on the road at upwards of 60 miles per hour, they keep two bike lengths between them.

And The Tribe isn’t the only local group that’s taking their chances on the newly empty roads.

Alex Sokolowski owns Magic Touch Mopeds, a full service garage in Seattle specifically for mopeds. He says his business currently has a steady influx of customers, but it’s not nearly as busy as it usually is around this time of year. And when customers do call in for an appointment, some get cold feet when the time comes to drop off their bike.

“We’ve definitely taken a hit because mopeds are generally a social thing,” Sokolowski explains. “Even if you don’t have any problems, the first thing you would want to do when you get your bike running is go visit the moped shop to show it off.”

Sokolowski is also the president of the Moped Army’s Seattle branch, which has 25 active members. As of now, official club business is indefinitely postponed. But some in the moped community, including Sokolowski, meet up for “social distance rides” on Sundays and “moped Mondays.”

“We’ll ride out and then disband at the end of the ride,” Sokolowski says. “Which is different from the way we usually do moped Monday.”

Because the moped’s engines are smaller than those in motorcycles, riders go for shorter distances. And especially now, they are avoiding winding roads.

“It’s obviously not the time you would want to have any sort of incident and visit the ER,” Sokolowski says. Additionally, he says, no one in the club who’s gone out for a ride has exhibited symptoms of the virus. (The CDC cautions that even asymptomatic people can spread the coronavirus.)

“Everybody that I know has been taking the quarantine pretty seriously, and has put a lot of thought into making the decision to go out and socially distance with our moped rides,” he says.

One event still in question is the annual “Mods and Rockers” ride, a June tradition that nods to the historic rivalry between Mods (scooter riders) and Rockers (motorcyclists). Legend has it the two subcultures battled it out on the beaches of Brighton, U.K., in 1964, in a fight that lasted two days. But these days the event is cause for friendly celebration of the two-wheeled lifestyle.

“The Cretins are great. I’ve partied with them many times,” Sokolowski says of the “rocker” club. “They’ve opened their clubhouse to us before and we’ve hosted parties there in the past.”

More than 80 riders on scooters, motorcycles and mopeds usually gather for Mods and Rockers — the mods starting their engines on one side of town, the rockers on the other. After meeting in the middle, the squads join forces and ride to a bar and afterparty.

Ziehe hopes the stay-at-home order isn’t extended into June, so that the Mods and Rockers can take to the road for the commemorative ride.

“We’re just holding out to make that decision to pull the plug on all of our events,” he says. “We’re not the only ones waiting and getting antsy.”

Regardless of the rules, Ziehe expects there will probably still be some riders who say, “I’m going to put on my leathers,” and do a solo ride on June 1 to honor the clash of cultures. But it isn’t the same.

“It’s such a group dynamic; that’s what makes it — that belonging,” Ziehe adds. “You’re never going to get the feeling [elsewhere] like when you’re actually at an event or riding with your fellow riders. You can’t replace it.”

The Different Types of Motorcycle Shipping Carriers

By | General Posts

A solution to your moving troubles

by Jason Mueller

Planning a move to another city, state, or country? Traveling and experiencing new places is exciting and promising. Packing and organizing the move, on the other hand, can be pretty intimidating and stressful, not to mention time-consuming.

A professional and reliable team of full-service movers can certainly make your life easier and make moving less of a nightmare. But what about your special items that require extra care and professional approach? Say, your vintage piano…or your motorcycle? Fortunately, there are plenty of shipping carriers that specialize in proper handling and transportation of items of every kind.

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Bikernet Bike Builder of the Month

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Cole Rogers from Cycle Fabrications in Lebanon, Ohio

By Bandit and Michael Lichter with photos by Michael Lichter

This is a kick-off piece. For years I attended every show in the country and met all the old and new builders. As my travel budget decreased and my desire to work in the shop and go to Bonneville increased, I missed out on some of the shows and the chance to meet new builders.

With the help of Michael Lichter, we are going to introduce Bikernet Readers to new, young, less well-known builders. The first one is Cole Rogers, from Lebanon, Ohio, who is 46 and has been building bikes since he was 15, when his brother scored a 1972 BSA A-70L for $300, 750 Lightening. There were only 201 built.

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David Leitch to produce Jutta Kleinschmidt biopic

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by Bang Showbiz from http://www.contactmusic.com

‘Hobbs & Shaw’ director David Leitch is to produce a biopic about German racing driver Jutta Kleinschmidt, the first woman to win the famous Dakar Rally.

‘Hobbs & Shaw’ director David Leitch is to produce a biopic on Jutta Kleinschmidt – the first and only woman to win the world-famous Dakar Rally.

Variety is reporting that David and his producing partner Kelly McCormick have brought the project to Amblin Partners and are set to produce the film through their 87North banners.

The pair will be joined by David Kaufmann, who first conceived of the movie, under his Devonsheer Media banner.

The Dakar Rally – often called the most dangerous race on the planet – combines both impossible terrains with logistical blindness. It began in 1978 and was run from Paris to Dakar, Senegal.

The race has since claimed over 70 lives but victory remains one of the most coveted prizes in motorsport. The 2020 rally took place in the Saudi Arabian desert, and competitors weren’t told the course until minutes before the start of each stage.

Jutta was born in Germany and bought her first motorcycle at the age of 18. She had worked at BMW before quitting in 1992 to pursue a career in motorsport.

In 1997, she became the first female to win a stage of the rally and finished third overall two years later. In 2001, after 15 years of trying, Jutta won the race.

The script will be penned by Greta Heinemann, who grew up just minutes from where Jutta was brought up. Greta is currently supervising producer on ‘Good Girls’.

Annie Marter will executive produce for 87 North and Jutta will co-produce the flick. Jeb Brody, president of production, and Mia Maniscalo, Vice President of creative affairs, will oversee for Amblin.

Leitch and McCormick also recently signed a first look deal at Universal and are producing the upcoming action movie, ‘Nobody’.

Pat Ryan, who opened his first motorcycle shop in Bakersfield at age 19, dies at 63

By | General Posts

by STEVEN MAYER from https://www.bakersfield.com

Who opens a retail business at age 19?

Patrick J. Ryan — his friends called him “Pat” — not only founded Bakersfield Motorcycle Supply at 2800 Chester Ave. in 1975, he later opened Ryan Kawasaki on Pierce Road where his passion for life and his full-throttle philosophy drew customers in droves.

Ryan, who later in life focused on real estate and spent 20 years restoring the Kern Island Building on H Street, died Wednesday. He was 63.

“Pat set the bar for me in retail,” said Kerry Ryan, Pat’s younger brother who owns Action Sports in Bakersfield.

“He had no fear, and he taught me to be fearless,” recalled the younger Ryan. “I don’t think I would have risked going into retail if Pat hadn’t done it first. I thought, ‘If Pat can do it, I can do it, too.’”

Born June 9, 1956, the oldest of six siblings, Pat Ryan fell in love with motorcycles at an early age, inspired by such ’60s movies as “Easy Rider” and “Bullitt,” which starred motorsports enthusiast Steve McQueen, “the king of cool,” said one of Pat Ryan’s two sons, Scott Ryan.

With money he earned as a paperboy delivering The Californian, Pat Ryan bought his first dirt bike. At the not-so-tender age of 14, Pat entered his first desert motorcycle race, the Vegas 120.

“Steve McQueen would also be in attendance that year,” said Scott Ryan. “At that time, Pat was the youngest entrant in the history of the race.”

He was just 15 when he got a job sweeping floors and doing other work at Davey’s Motorcycle on Chester Avenue. Pat worked his way into counter sales, ordering custom parts and assisting customers with service needs.

The budding businessman continued customizing bikes and racing through high school, said Scott Ryan. After graduating from Highland High School in 1974, Ryan decided against college, despite the years he spent in gifted classes.

“He figured out how to make money early,” said Tom Carosella, a close lifelong friend who graduated with Ryan in ’74.

“He was fearless,” said Carosella, who went into car stereo sales as Ryan was diving into motorsports. “If he wanted to do something, he just jumped into it.”

Ryan had a rare gift with people, and his love of life translated into the ability to make people laugh.

“He could go into a bar or restaurant and size up the whole room,” Carosella said of his friend. “It was an incredible ability. But even when things turned to crap in his life, he could see the good.”

It was a trait he would come to need.

In 1980, Pat Ryan finished construction on a new location just north of the Garces Circle. The building was Bakersfield’s first to meet California’s new energy efficient building standards, Scott Ryan said.

In 1981, after an ATV accident Pat Ryan saw a doctor to check for broken ribs. Instead, the doctor found a tumor.

“I took him to San Luis Obispo where he got his diagnosis,” Carosella recalled. “We were 25 or so, and ill-equipped to understand what that meant.”

But it didn’t take Ryan long.

“I remember vividly he could talk about it (having cancer) easily,” Kerry Ryan said. “He’d say, ‘Yeah, I have cancer, but I’m going to beat it.’”

He projected strength and confidence, and in turn, got it back from friends, establishing a circle of positive attitude.

Pat successfully battled cancer, often receiving his radiation therapy before going into work to help customers, Scott Ryan said. The experience “supercharged his focus on enjoying life, family, and making others smile.”

Ryan went on to build two more projects in the 1980s, a warehouse building on Jewett Avenue and his dream flagship store, a dream he drew on the back of a napkin.

“He called it Times Square,” Scott Ryan said. The building on Pierce Road — now Buck Owens Boulevard — was designed to feature a rendition of Bakersfield’s historic Beale Memorial Clock Tower. When completed the building was nominated for a Beautiful Bakersfield award.

As the parent of two sons, Neal and Scott Ryan, Pat was a hands-on father.

“He was proud to be a dad,” Kerry Ryan said.

Pat’s notoriety and business grew throughout the 1980s and 1990s.

“If you had a radio or TV, you became familiar with his infectious enthusiasm and positive energy,” Scott Ryan recalled. “Every advertisement ended with the jingle ‘We love motorcycles!’”

“To this day I still have people ask me, ‘Your dad is We love motorcycles! right?’ I’m proud to respond, ‘Yes.’”

During his career, Ryan co-founded and helped organize the Bakersfield Toy Run, a charity to a help people in need. And during the 1980s when Jet Skis became a craze, safety became an issue as collisions were on the rise. As the local Kawasaki dealer, Ryan worked with the county of Kern to designate a safe area for the recreational sport.

“Pat Ryan and Kawasaki partnered up to organize and fund the Jet Ski Recreational Area Project, and beautification of Buena Vista Lake,” Scott Ryan said. “Together they donated picnic tables, park benches, a boat launch ramp and camping spaces designated for Jet Ski users.”

Eventually, Ryan got out of the motorsports business, and focused on real estate.

In declining health in more recent years, Ryan focused on long-term tenants at his Kern Island Building, which was built by Kern County Land Co. in the 1950s. Primarily focused on nonprofit organizations that were important in serving the community’s needs, Ryan would donate a portion of the rents and provide additional free space to help support their mission.

Pat Ryan lived life on his own terms, said his brother Kerry. It may not have always been a lifestyle that promoted longevity, but it was the way he wanted to live. Full, fun and fast.

“Pat loved riding 100 percent throttle,” Kerry Ryan said, “whether it was on a motorcycle or in life in general.”

NCOM Biker News Bytes for April 2020

By | General Posts

Convention Rescheduled Pandemic, Motorcycle Market, Essential Workers and More…
By Bill Bish

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the National Coalition of Motorcyclists 35th annual NCOM Convention has been rescheduled for the middle of October at the Marriott Indianapolis East (7202 East 21st Street), the same location in Indiana as previously planned.

“At this time, the NCOM board urges you and your families to follow the advice of the health departments and keep yourselves safe,” said James “Doc” Reichenbach II, Chairman of the NCOM Board of Directors, adding that “Losing one person is one too many.”

Stay tuned for further details as NCOM continues to monitor this deadly global outbreak and its impact on the motorcycling community.

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