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Ujjwal Dey

Dayton Dude Harley-Davidson Fat Boy Is a Different Shade of Grey

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

A body in Audi Daytona grey instead of the omnipresent Nardo grey, and a number of technical enhancements were all it took to transform this Harley-Davidson Fat Boy into a stunning, light-absorbing motorcycle.

The customized motorcycle we have in the gallery above is the work of a Germany-based Harley custom bike builder by the name of Thunderbike. Established in the 1980s, the group was at first in the business of repairing mostly Japanese bikes, but made a switch to customizing Harley a couple of decades ago.

Their projects, which often come as Harley-based conversions, but at times include custom frame builds, have been around since the early 2000s, and the experience gained during these years shows.

This Fat Boy, called in Thunderbike speak Dayton Dude, is the newest model in the customization range. As most others, it features tons of custom parts, ranging from the most visible ones like the front and rear fenders to the smallest, like the turn signal and handlebar.

The motorcycle rides on bicolor-finish wheels, sized 21 inches at the front and 18 inches at the rear. To make sure all can admire the construction of the rear one, a pulley brake system has been used.

Another functional enhancement made to the Fat Boy is the air ride suspension kit that helps manage the distance between the steel fender and the rear tire.

All these new parts (the entire list of modification made can be found at this link) would probably have looked good anyway, but the light-absorbing matte hue on them and the Audi Daytona grey chosen to dress other parts of the bike make the entire build appear stunning.

The builders of the Dayton Dude describe the motorcycle as “one of the most harmonious Fat Boy conversion concepts from our workshop,” but no figure was provided for the cost of the conversion.

Spec Showdown: Triumph Rocket 3 Vs. Yamaha VMax

By | General Posts

by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

Power cruisers punch out.

For 2019, Triumph upped the ante on the Rocket 3 with the introduction of an entirely new generation. The upgrades included a new look and also a bigger engine which is no small feat considering the Rocket 3 already rocked the biggest production motorcycle engine on the market. Just like that, a new benchmark was set in the power cruiser segment. 

While the definition of power cruisers is rather broad, there’s only handful of 1,500cc-plusmodels the Rocket 3 can measure up toConsidering the Triumph sits at the top of the category with a higher price tag, we thought we’d take a look at how it compares to one of its more affordable competitors, its Japanese counterpart, theYamaha VMaxLet’s have a look at how the two models compare on paper. 

2020 Triumph Rocket 3R 2020 Yamaha VMax
Engine: 2,458cc, water-cooled, inline-three cylinder 1,679cc, liquid-cooled, 65-degree V4
Bore, Stroke, Compression: 110.2mm x 85.9mm, 10.8:1 90mm x 66mm, 11.3:1
Transmission and Final Drive: gears, shaft 5 gears, shaft
Performance: 165 hp/163 lb-ft -/123 lb-ft
Weight 641.5 pounds (dry) 683 pounds (wet)
Price: $21,900  $17,999

Performance 

Of course, we can’t talk power cruisers without discussing their performance. The Rocket 3 boasts the biggest production motorcycle engine of the industry which gives it an undeniable appeal versus the Yamaha. That being said, though its engine is almost half the size of the Rocket (displacement wise), the VMax can pull its own weight and give the Triumph a run for its money. 

While the Rocket 3 produces more torque than the Vmax (163 versus 143)there’s a possibility that the Japanese power cruiser outperforms its British counterpart on the pony front.  While Yamaha doesn’t disclose any horsepower figures, several sources suggest it produces “over 170 horsepower”, possibly even 200, according to some. That’s easily between 5 to as much as 35 hp more than the Rocket. Because the numbers aren’t from Yamaha, however, we can’t take them into consideration.  

What Yamaha does confirm, however, is that the VMax has a higher compression ratio than the Rocket 3 which means you get more bang (literally) for your buck.  

As for weight, the two companies both showcase different information. Triumph sticks to the dry weight (without the fluids) while Yamaha gives a more reallistic, ready-to-operate weight. Fueled up and ready to go, the Rocket 3 likely weighs about the same as the VMax, give or take a couple of pounds. Based on manufacturer-provided date, this means that the Rocket 3 offers the best power-to-weight ratio (unless Yamaha eventually confirms a horsepower figure.) 

Cruising

Though they like to flex their massive engines and show off their muscles, the Rocket 3 and the VMax are cruisers above all. How well do they perform on that front? Pretty darn well if I may say so.  

Neither Triumph and Yamaha have lost sight of their models’ role in their respective lineups and in the segment they compete in. As good as high-performance ratings look, riders are also interested in the ride itself—or shall we say the “cruise”? For that reason, both companies offer a wide range of elective accessories owners can outfit their cruisers with. The selection in both ranges includes saddle bags, luggage racks, heated grips, taller windscreens, etc. Triumph also offers the Rocket 3 GT which comes fully loaded with a number of additional accessories for a $700 premium over the Rocket 3 R’s starting price.  

Whether you prefer British or Japanese muscle, both offer equally good customization options to help make them more cruising and travel friendly. While creature comfort and equipment weigh heavy in the balance when buying a bike you’d like to travel onthe range is also another factor to consider. This is where the Rocket 3 gets to shine.  

The Triumph is armed with a 4.8-gallon fuel tank and despite the size of its engine, it’s rated at a reasonable 32.43 miles per gallon (mpg). This means that you should be able to get roughly 155 miles out of a single tank. The Yamaha has a smaller, 4-gallon tank. With a fuel economy rating of 27 mpg, this means you should get 108 miles out of a full tank of gas.   

Price 

There’s a healthy $4,000 different between the Yamaha and the Triumph. Interestingly, the despite the price gap, both models have a lot to offer in terms of standard equipment. However, the Rocket 3 does have a leg (or a wheel?) up on its competitor thanks to such standard features as Bluetooth connectivity, navigation, Showa suspension hardware, a beefier engine (of course), and cruise control. Plus, let’s not forget that the Triumph badge tends to come with a small premium anyway.  

While the VMax has quite the striking the design, this generation of the model has been around for over a decade compared and the platform is quite old by the industry’s standards. That being said, though it offers fewer standard features than the Rocket, the VMax manages to stay competitive and relevant thanks to its price also dating from 2009. Launch MSRP was $17,990 11 years ago which at the time was considered premium. A $9 increase in the span of a decade is more than reasonable. 

In Conclusion

The new-generation Triumph Rocket 3 is a beast worthy of its legacy with a bigger, meaner engine and some serious cruising chops. It doesn’t hold a candle to its American competitors. At $21,900, Triumph makes sure that customers get a good deal for their money by loading the bike up with features. Look-wise, from a subjective point of view, it’s also the better-looking bike with a flowing silhouette, dual headlight, and an overall assembly that looks more “finished”.

That being said, while the platform is a bit long in the tooth despite a few recent updates, the Yamaha VMax is just quirky enough to deserve to be on any cruiser lover’s shopping list. Between its massive air ducts and eclectic silhouette, the model stands out, for better or for worst. Plus, the 2.5L inline-three might be the biggest, most powerful engine of the two but the V4 has the most distinct sound.

The Rocket 3 is the power cruiser poster child and the VMax is the weird but endearing cousin.

Other Features

Wheelbase: 66 inches 66.9 inches
Seat Height: 30.4 inches 30.5 inches
Brakes: Dual 320mm discs with Brembo M4.30 Stylema 4-piston radial monobloc calipers front, Single 300mm disc, Brembo M4.32 4-piston monobloc caliper back, Cornering ABS Dual 320mm wave-type discs6-piston calipers with Brembo master cylinder front,  

298mm wave-type disc, single-piston caliper with Brembo master cylinder back 

Suspension Showa 47-mm inverted fork front, Showa monoshock with reservoir RSU with remote hydraulic preload adjuster 52mm inverted fork front, Single shock with remote reservoir and remote adjustable for preload back.
Features: High-specification Avon Cobra Chrome tires, LED headlight, 2nd generation TFT instruments, Four riding modes, Hill-hold control, Cruise control, Keyless ignition, USB charging port, Free ‘MyTriumph’ app.  slipper clutch, ABS, drag-style instruments, LCD.

May is national Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month

By | General Posts

from https://www.limaohio.com

May is National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month and the Ohio State Highway Patrol reminds motorcyclists to ride trained and sober. As summer approaches, motorists should be aware of an increase in motorcycles on the roadways.

There were 3,585 traffic crashes involving motorcycles in 2019 that resulted in 165 deaths and 3,245 injuries. Overall, 79 percent of motorcycle-involved crashes resulted in at least one injury or death.

The patrol issued 1,552 citations to motorcyclists last year; 65% included a speed violation, 21% were for operating a motorcycle without a proper license and 6% were for OVI.

“Being trained and wearing the proper equipment are two ways motorcyclists can be responsible when riding this summer,” said Lt. Jonathon Gray, commander of the Van Wert patrol post. “All motorists should share the road and be aware of their surroundings, as well as other vehicles using the roadway.”

Ohio law requires helmets for riders under 18 and drivers with less than one year of motorcycle experience. Passengers on motorcycles must wear helmets when the driver is required to do so.

This BMW R nineT doesn’t need a stand but can rest on its belly instead

By | General Posts

by Abhilasha Singh from https://www.financialexpress.com

Today’s custom-build feature comes from Zillers Garage in Russia and there are more than one reasons why it needs everybody’s attention. For one, it looks rather otherworldly with a mix of retro but futuristic bodywork. Dmitry Golubchikov of Zillers Garage was commissioned by BMW Motorrad Russia and the inspiration from aviation. (Source: Bikeexif)

It’s based on a 2016-model R nineT, but all that remains from the original motorcycle is the engine, final drive arm and part of the frame. Everything else has been created in-house and it took a total of 10 months to put together. The entire motorcycle is wrapped in hand-formed aluminium with the boxer’s cylinder heads still poking out the bodywork.

The big arch is the highlight of the design and it also is a functional cockpit complete with a Motogadget Motoscope Mini Speedo and a set of push buttons. The head and tail lamps have been integrated in the bodywork and there’s even slide-out storage compartment in the tail which has a phone charging port and a socket to plug a battery charger into.

Now, about what we were on about in the beginning how this bike doesn’t need a stand of any kind to stay upright. It is designed to rest on its bellypan. A couple of buttons on top control the pneumatic system that raises to the bike when its time to set off.

The 18” wheels are fully custom and have been machined of aluminum to resemble turbines. Dmitry also fabricated a stainless steel two-into-one exhaust system, which snakes into the bodywork before emerging in a single muffler on the left. The bulges on each side of the main fuselage hide twin 3D-printed air boxes, kitted out with car air filters.

The extreme motorcycle design is complemented by a mute monochrome paint job. Everything wears the same shade of grey and accented only by subtle pin striping in light grey. Sure, a side stand is simple and cheaper mechanism to work out but that’s the point. This build is meant to be outlandish. Frankly speaking these are all the shades of grey we’re interested in.

Harley-Powered Custom Bike Is All About Naked Metal Bones

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com/

Simple, low, naked metallic skeleton. That’s all you need to describe the custom bike build that goes by the name of Flawless 3, assembled in Germany by a group called Thunderbike.

The Germans have been a solid group of bike builders since the 1980s, when they came into being as a repair shop for Japanese bikes, mostly. They kept doing that well until the early 2000s, when sales dropped in the motorcycle industry in general.

Among the few last standing in those troubled times was Harley-Davidson, so Thunderbike made a turn in its business mode and decided to focus on customizing the American-made machines. And we’re glad they did.

After the Softail-based Black Star 110 we showed you yesterday, it’s time to have a look at another build Thunderbike was responsible for. We’re not talking about another Harley conversion, but an original frame.

The garage calls this build Flawless 3, because it has been constructed on an existing platform that goes by the same name. And it’s a stunner.

The flowing frame of the bike seems to have been cast upright, made of melted metal that was instantly frozen in place when the desired, complete shape was achieved. The paint job chosen for the frame and fuel tank helps maintain the cold look of the motorcycle.

The frame rides very low to the ground, supported by a full air-suspension. Thanks to it, the ride height can be increased by up to 10 cm (4 inches) in times of need so no harm is done to the underside.

It holds a 110ci Harley-Davidson engine from CVO models, and rides on differently-sized wheels made out of solid aluminum blocks: 26 inches front and 21 inches rear.

Thunderbike’s frame line includes more insane builds, that sell either as kits or are one-offs. You can have a look at them all at this link.

BMW R1250RS conversion / handlebar risers F900R/XR

By | General Posts

BMW R1250RS conversion by Hornig – Sports tourer on a new level

What do you expect from a sports tourer like the BMW R1250RS? Overall, a coherent and perfect combination of tour comfort and sporty influences. Due to our conversion, the motorcycle reaches a new level when travelling as well as during race track training.

BMW R1250RS conversion by Hornig
(press release and printable pictures)
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=432

Handlebar Risers with Offset for BMW F900R & F900XR

Raising the handlebar by 30mm results in a more upright, much more relaxed seating position. Moreover, the handlebar is brought 25mm closer to the rider which additionally improves driving comfort. The handlebar riser also makes riding while standing less tiring, which is of tremendous benefit to taller riders in particular. The overall result is a noticeable increase in stamina and concentration. Long stretches on the motorway are less nerve-racking, and even fast, difficult off-road sections are easier to handle.
Easy to fit in minutes. No need for long cables or brake cables! Fits on original handlebar.

Handlebar Risers with Offset for BMW F900R & F900XR
99,90 Euro up (incl. VAT) plus shipping
(press release and printable pictures)
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=433

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Motorcycleparts.Hornig

YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrHornig

Instagram: hornig.motorcycle.parts
https://www.instagram.com/hornig.motorcycle.parts/

Your readers could also be interested in:

BMW R1250R conversion by Hornig – amazingly different
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=430

GPS Mount for BMW F900XR
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=429

Side stand foot enlargement for BMW F900R & F900XR
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=428

Lithium battery and battery charger for BMW motorcycles
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=427

Kind regards,

Motorcycle Accessory Hornig GmbH
Gewerbepark Chammünster Nord C 5
D93413 Cham

Germany

http://www.motorcycleparts-hornig.com

CEO: Hornig Helmut
Regensburg HRB 10330
Ust.Id.Nr. DE251397246
Fon: 0049 9971 99 66 10
Fax: 0049 9971 99 66 110

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Motorcycleparts.Hornig
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/MrHornig

Motorcycles With Car Engines: A Brief History of Two-Wheeled Absurdity

By | General Posts

In their own way, each of them is outrageous. But some are more so than others.

To make this list, the resulting car-hearted bike needs to have been a streetable production model, although some were series production and some were conversions or customs built in bulk. There are plenty of one-offs out there with even wilder engines than these, but we’re using this criteria to pare things down.

CLICK HERE TO READ THIS ARTICLE ON BIKERNET

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Black Star 110 Is What Happens to a Harley-Davidson in Germany

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

There’s no official data on the number of custom shops around the world in the business of remaking Harleys, but rest assured there’s plenty of them. Some spit out new models several years apart, but there are others, far fewer, that work around the clock on making the already incredible machines even better.

Germany-based Thuderbike is part of the latter category. Having started life in the 1980s as a repair shop for mainly Japanese bikes, Thunderbike turned its sights on products of American behemoth Harley-Davidson, and spat out the first custom bike based on a Milwaukee-made machine in 2003.

Since then, many others have hit the roads, most of them customized at the request of the owners. The latest project Thunderbike was involved in is the Black Star 110, a build that started life as a Harley-Davidson Softail Slim S, transitioned to a custom form the company calls Black Apple, and then settled into the shape you see in the gallery above.

The bike was commissioned by a customer about nine months ago, and was ready for a photoshoot at the end of April. The result is according to Thunderbike “one of the most radical bikes in our 18-series Softail Collection.”

It rides on differently-sized wheels (21-inch front, 23-inch rear) and, with the exception of the fuel tank and the fork, which received only minor upgrades, features extensive modifications. The front and rear fenders are new, as are the swingwarm and the turn signals. There are other handlebars than the ones you would see on the stock Harley, new footpegs, and new mirrors.

The paint job on the motorcycle is unique as well and comes with Harley lettering on the fuel tank and the Black Star 110 name beneath the saddle.

There is no word on whether modifications were made to the bike’s engine, the Screamin’ Eagle 110.

 

Harley-Davidson Dealerships Ranked #1 in 2020 for Responding to Website Customers

By | General Posts

from https://www.oaoa.com

Associated Press |

MONTEREY, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–May 4, 2020–

Harley-Davidson dealerships ranked highest in the 2020 Pied Piper PSI ® Internet Lead Effectiveness ® (ILE ® ) Industry Study, which answers the question, “What happens when motorcycle or UTV customers visit a dealer website and inquire about a vehicle?” Dealerships selling Indian motorcycles were ranked second.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200503005001/en/

2020 Pied Piper PSI – Motorcycle / UTV Internet Lead Effectiveness Industry Study (USA) – Ranking by Brand (Graphic: Pied Piper)

The study was completed before the appearance of the coronavirus pandemic, but in the aftermath of the pandemic dealer response to website customers has become even more critical.

Pied Piper submitted customer inquiries through the individual websites of 6,012 dealerships between July 2019 and February 2020, asking a question about a vehicle in inventory, and providing a customer name, email address and local telephone number. Pied Piper then evaluated how the dealerships responded by email, telephone and text message over the next 24 hours. Twenty different measurements generate dealership Internet Lead Effectiveness ® (ILE ® ) scores, which range from zero to 100. 13% of dealerships nationwide scored above 70, demonstrating an extensive and effective website-response process, while 36% of dealerships scored below 30, showing failure to personally respond in any way to their website customers.

The study found widespread industrywide improvement from 2019 to 2020, with the industry average ILE score increasing from 33 to 42. Brands which led the industry in improvement over the past year were Indian, Harley-Davidson, Polaris and Yamaha. Only three of thirty-three brands failed to increase their score from 2019: Club Car (Ingersoll Rand), Cub Cadet (MTD Products) and Arctic Cat (Textron).

Nearly all of today’s customers first use their smart phone to shop before ever visiting a dealership in person. Pied Piper finds that most dealers today understand that responding to web customers is critical to sales success, but there is still plenty of variation in dealership behaviors. “The key to driving improvement in both web-response behaviors and sales,” said Fran O’Hagan, President and CEO of Pied Piper, “is to show dealers what their web customers are really experiencing. It’s often a surprise.”

PSI ® Internet Lead Effectiveness ® (ILE ® ) Industry Studies have been conducted annually since 2011. The 2020 Pied Piper PSI-ILE Industry Study (U.S.A. Motorcycle/UTV) was conducted between July 2019 and February 2020 by submitting customer internet inquiries directly to a sample of 6,012 dealerships nationwide representing all major brands. Examples of other recent Pied Piper PSI studies are the 2020 PSI-ILE U.S. Auto Industry Study (Toyota brand was ranked first), and the 2019 “PSI for EVs” U.S. Auto Industry Study (Tesla brand was ranked first for selling in-person). Complete Pied Piper PSI industry study results are provided to vehicle manufacturers and national dealer groups. Manufacturers, national dealer groups and individual dealerships also order PSI evaluations—in-person, internet or telephone—as tools to measure and improve the sales effectiveness of their dealerships. For more information about the fact-based Prospect Satisfaction Index ® process, go to www.piedpiperpsi.com.

Harley’s New Rewire Strategy Is A Bad Idea

By | General Posts

by Justin Hughes from https://www.rideapart.com

Why refocus the brand on capturing a rapidly shrinking demographic?

Earlier this week we reported on Harley-Davidson’s latest change in direction: to abandon some of their more ambitious ideas and focus on growing the core brand, with their core bikes, in the US. While models like the LiveWire, Bronx, and Pan America are already far enough down the pipeline to continue, beyond that we can expect nothing more than cruisers, baggers, and tourers from Harley for the foreseeable future. That’s too bad.

As an amateur radio operator, I have often heard the derogatory joke that the average age of one who participates in the hobby is “dead.” Sadly, that is beginning to apply more and more to the average age of a typical Harley rider. There are always exceptions. I’ve had my radio license since I was 15, and I’m actually considering an 80s or 90s Harley for a future project bike. But even I have a bit of gray in my hair and beard, something you will see in the vast majority of Harley enthusiasts. We’re only getting older.

From the investors’ perspective, I get it. They’re not in it for the bikes or the culture. They’re in it for the money, and especially these days the money isn’t there. Shareholder Impala Asset Management has been arguing for a while that a change in direction is needed, and chose to act during the recent management shakeup at Harley. While we hoped this might be good for Harley, it looks like they have chosen to take what it sees as the safe path, prioritizing short term profit over the long term survival of the company.

Given the crazy economic condition of the world right now, maybe that’s the right choice for now. It’s not like there will be any long term plans if the company doesn’t survive the next year, for example. Its existing models won’t save the company, though. While used Harleys are cheap, new ones are still expensive. Harley is essentially competing with itself, with all the used bikes out there that are may not be quite as good as the latest and greatest, but are certainly far less expensive. Harley tried some entry-level bikes with the Street series, but hasn’t seen the success they had hoped for.

Of course, there’s also the fact that there are other types of motorcycles in the world than cruisers, and that’s what most younger riders want. We like the LiveWire. We’re genuinely excited about the Bronx and Pan America. Even here, though, I’m worried. For example, while Harley has not yet announced pricing for the Pan America, some suspect it could be in the ballpark of $19,000. Why would the serious adventure rider spend that much on a new, untested Harley when they can pick up the tried and true BMW R 1250 GS for $17,895? Again, we don’t know that the Harley will cost more than the BMW, but if it does, it will essentially doom its sales to failure before it even gets into the showroom. The same goes for the Bronx, where riders would be more likely to go with a Yamaha MT-09 or even a smaller Triumph Street Triple.

It’s possible that the intention of the Harley Rewire is damage control for the current economic situation. Cutting research and development of new models is a natural choice in these circumstances. I just hope this is a temporary step until the world stabilizes again, and that we’ll eventually see some of the new models that Harley has put the brakes on. I want to see Harley survive as much as the next American motorcycle rider.