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Ujjwal Dey

Opportunistic Bikernet Weekly News for April 9, 2020

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Investment Strategies and News from Around the World

Hey,

Life is nuts and then you die. I find it crazy how some folks want to turn a recommendation into a law. They seem to want control. They want to find reasons for control, or maybe they want others to handle the issue for them. I wonder if a University ever took on the study of control?

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KTM joins BMW Motorrad in opting out of EICMA, Intermot due to coronavirus pandemic

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by Express Drives Desk from https://www.financialexpress.com/

In the best interest of their employees and customers, KTM AG will withdraw from global trade shows for the rest of the year, including INTERMOT in Cologne, Germany and the EICMA exhibition in Milan, Italy.

KTM AG have announced that the company will not participate in the motorcycle shows – EICMA and Intermot – this year due to continuing uncertainties prevailing because of the coronavirus pandemic. This means that both brands – KTM and Husqvarna – will be absent from the two very important motorcycle shows. Earlier this month, BMW Motorrad also announced opting out of the two shows as well. KTM AG has gone on to suggest event organisers, especially of EICMA, to move the dates to 2021.

The press statement from KTM AG reads that the company assessed their overall strategy for the rest of 2020 and have decided to make several key decisions in the wake of COVID-19 impacting public health, communities, the motorcycle industry and business on a global scale.

In the best interest of their employees and customers, the company will withdraw from global trade shows for the rest of the year, including INTERMOT in Cologne, Germany and the EICMA exhibition in Milan, Italy.

The proper planning of such events is currently at risk due to the uncertainty surrounding public gathering restrictions in most countries. The annual success of these indoor shows also sees hundreds of thousands of visitors gathering in enclosed spaces for a period lasting days and even weeks. For these reasons, KTM AG have identified their exclusion as a way to contribute towards a safe and strong return to normal activity.

Husqvarna Motorcycles will push ahead with current and future projects in order to provide the motorcycling market with exciting and innovative models and look for the best ways to show-off these developments. The KTM AG board of directors wishes to communicate that the coming months represent a small squeeze on the brake, but hands are very much poised on the throttle for the rest of 2020.

“Trade shows are key business milestones for the entire motorcycle industry but given the situation, public health and the welfare of our staff are higher priorities over the coming months. We have taken this course of action with a great deal of thought and, as a company, KTM AG would be pleased and interested if show promoters, EICMA in particular, would consider moving dates to 2021, where we hope and expect the situation to be settled and back to normal,” Hubert Trunkenpolz, KTM AG CMO, said.

Aprilia Terra 250 adventure motorcycle spied in China

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by Abhinand Venugopal from https://www.rushlane.com

Aprilia’s new Terra 250 adventure motorcycle is powered by the same power plant in CFMoto’s 250NK

Italian two-wheeler brand, Aprilia is apparently working on a new adventure (or dual-sport) motorcycle in the 250cc category, for the Chinese market. It was recently spied at Zongshen Aprilia’s manufacturing facility in a market-ready format. Zongshen Aprilia is the Italian automaker’s Chinese counterpart.

Aprilia already sells the Terra 150 in China. The 150cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder motorcycle (which originally made its debut in a 125cc avatar) is relatively expensive and has not been able to perform well on monthly sales charts. Zongshen Aprilia aims to change this story with its new Terra 250. The motorcycle could be introduced in other Asian markets in phases but it is too early to make any conclusions.

The Aprilia Terra 250 is based on a split-cradle chassis frame with a box-section swingarm and a tubular handlebar. To aid off-roading characteristics, it gets 18-inch front and 17-inch rear spoke wheels with knobby tyres. Reports state that this is the standard version and a more capable ‘Adventure’ variant could be introduced alongside (with longer suspension travel and 21-inch wheels at the front).

At the moment, a lot of details about the motorcycle remain unknown. However, it shares its power plant with the CFMoto 250NK which could be launched in India soon. The 249.2cc liquid-cooled DOHC single-cylinder engine makes around 26bhp @ 9,000rpm and 22Nm @ 7,500rpm. This is mated to a 6-speed gearbox via a slipper clutch. The CFMoto 250NK can hit a top speed of 140km/h.

The Aprilia GPR 250, which was introduced in China last year, is also powered by the same engine. In the Aprilia Terra 250, the output characteristics could be slightly tuned to suit its touring or off-roading trait. The Terra 250 is a potential product for Aprilia India considering the country’s growing interest in adventure-tourers and low-capacity off-roaders. If launched, it will directly lock horns with KTM India’s upcoming 250 Adventure while also being an interesting alternative to Royal Enfield’s Himalayan and Hero MotoCorp’s Xpulse 200.

However, Aprilia India had previously disappointed Indian motorcycle enthusiasts by stepping away from introducing the RS 150 and Tuono 150. The motorcycles were first showcased in India back at Auto Expo 2018. At the time, the Aprilia RS 150 seemed to be a compelling alternative to Yamaha Motor India’s YZF-R15 V2.0 (now YZF-R15 V3.0). If the Aprilia Tuono 150 was introduced by now, it could have been a strong rival to the Yamaha MT-15.

Laconia Motorcycle Week organizers consider delaying 2020 event

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by KC Downey from https://www.wmur.com/

Organizers to decide by end of April

LACONIA, N.H. — Organizers of Laconia Motorcycle Week will decide by the end of this month whether to reschedule this year’s event because of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.

They are discussing a move of the event’s start from the weekend of June 13 to the weekend of August 22.

The head of the Motorcycle Week Association said it would be great for morale to keep to the original schedule, but safety must come first.

Still considered one of the largest motorcycle gatherings in the country, the event is now in its 97th year.

For more information, visit https://laconiamcweek.com/.

Vyrus Alyen Powered By Ducati – Motorcycle From The Future

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by Satya Singh from https://www.rushlane.com/

A bike that appears to utilize advanced alien engineering, Vyrus Alyen easily qualifies as a formidable competitor to the likes of batpod

Vyrus is an Italy based innovation workshop that has been producing absolute masterpieces for more than thirty years. The workshop’s latest creation Alyen is a seamless blend of art, passion, performance and hi-tech innovation. The awe-inspiring motorcycle seems like a product from the future, with the idea probably being brought home by a time traveller.

While Vyrus Alyen appears to be quite heavy by its looks, its weight may be well below your expectations. That’s because the motorcycle utilizes lightweight carbon fibre for its wheels and bodywork. The forged carbon fibre wheels have been sourced from Rotobox, a firm that specializes in producing lightweight yet extra strong wheels. The uniquely shaped wheels also enhance the bike’s visual appeal and overall aesthetics.

As of now, Vyrus has released only some basic information about Alyen. The motorcycle is powered by a 1285 cc, water-cooled, Ducati L shaped 90° Desmo drive engine that produces max power of 205 hp at 10,500 rpm. Max torque is 144.6 Nm at 8,750 rpm. However, this also makes it a fuel guzzler. With its small fuel tank, Vyrus Alyen would be most appropriate for short rides. Engine is mated to a 6-speed gearbox and comes with wet clutch.

Vyrus Alyen sits on Magnesium double omega frame that is integrated with a self-supporting composite body. Suspension system comprises push rod twin pivot units at both front and rear. The hub-centre steering system works independently and does not interact with suspension functions.

Also known as hydraulic wired steering system, it was designed in 2004 by Vyrus project leader Ascanio Rodorigo. It was used for the first time in Bimota Tesi 2D superbike. As braking forces do not impact suspension movements, it makes Alyen a lot more agile when negotiating corners. Braking duties are performed by Brembo GP4 series.

To get an idea about Vyrus Alyen’s performance, we can look at the 1285 cc Ducati engine that can reach 0-60 kmph in just around 4 seconds. Top speed is 300 kmph.

Vyrus has not revealed how many of Alyen motorcycles will be produced. Vyrus motorcycles are usually manufactured in limited numbers and are meant for collectors and enthusiasts. You would be lucky to spot a Vyrus Alyen on the streets. Motorcycles created by Vyrus are also known to be priced astronomically. To know the price, you need to contact the Vyrus team.

New Kalk INK SL Electric Motorcycle Revealed with $10K Price Tag for the U.S.

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

For a while now, a Swedish electric motorcycle manufacturer by the name of Cake has been moving to position itself as a noteworthy adversary in this expanding segment. Its moves have been rather shy so far, but as of this summer the company is going head on into the segment with a brand new entry.

This week, Cake gave us a dose of optimism for an outdoor summer with the introduction of the Kalk INK SL, a vehicle meant to be used for off-roading and the casual trip to and from work in equal measure.

Cake says the new bike can be legally used on the road both in the U.S. and Europe. It is based on the same technology that underpins other Cake Kalk products (OR, &, and INK), but modified in such a way as to provide the performance required from a street-legal electric motorcycle.

Sharing the drivetrain, battery, and aluminum frame with the others from its family, the INK SL separates itself from the pack by making use of a non-linkage suspension at the rear and motocross suspension at the front, black fenders and bodywork made from polycarbonate and ABS, and two 19-inch wheels.

In addition, as a means to make it legal to operate on the road, the motorcycle received turn signals, front headlight, rear brake light, and a license plate holder.

Mechanically, the speed of the motorcycle has been increased to 62 mph (100 kph) to provide it with the required highway speeds. The range is of about three hours, which translates into anywhere between 22 to 53 miles (35 to 86 km), depending on how it is ridden.

“With the launch of the Kalk INK SL, we introduce the fourth model of street-legal CAKE bikes next to the Kalk& and recently released Ösa+ and Ösa Lite. Each of these models combines excitement with responsibility to inspire a turn toward zero emissions, whether that’s in remote or urban environments.” said in a statement Cake CEO Stefan Ytterborn.

The bike goes on sale this summer, and sells for $10,500 in the U.S and €10,500 in Europe.

Kawasaki’s Open-Road Ready 2020 Ninja 1000SX Ups The Comfort, Tech And Power

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by Bill Roberson from https://www.forbes.com

It’s raining and I’m sheltering in place with my family, which sadly means no motorcycle riding as spring weather imminently arrives in the Northwest. Thankfully, Kawasaki just broke the boredom by holding a model reveal online, as is the sudden new norm, and the new bike is the 2020 Ninja 1000SX. It looks to be another fine machine from the always capable Kawasaki. But after the presentation, I found myself wandering down memory lane (and through digitized photos) to the first and only Ninja I personally owned. In the early 1990’s, I happened across a pristine first-gen Top Gun era 1986 GPz 900 Ninja in bone-stock, unblemished like-new condition (below). Resplendent in original red, white and blue livery, it was by that time somewhat of a performance relic, but I bought it anyway because, well, I had always wanted one and the price was right. Compared to the back-road-strafing Suzuki GSX-R 750 I was riding at the time, it was heavy, a bit wobbly when pressed in the curves, and big. But still, it was just so cool. It still is.

One weekend, a riding buddy and I saddled up our respective bikes with some soft bags and headed out to parts unknown in the wide-open (and very lightly patrolled) reaches of eastern Oregon. Midway into a long leg of the trip, my cohort was complaining about the uncomfortable riding position of his mount and tried everything from using the rear pegs to sitting on towels to soothe the pain. But I had made an unexpected discovery: That big, heavy GPz Ninja was a near-perfect sport-touring machine, with a supple yet sporty suspension, a comfortable seat, a near-perfect bar-seat-peg triangle (for myself at least), and a willing, powerful engine. That was the first of many long trips on the Ninja.

Over 30 years later, Kawasaki’s now-venerable Ninja nameplate has gone through numerous iterations and generations, ranging from sword-sharp track attack weapons to the beyond-bonkers 300+hp H2R supercharged exotic. But sitting in the sweet spot in the lineup is the great, great grandchild of that first GPz machine, the 2020 Ninja 1000SX. It still looks fast, with rakish, geometric bodywork and a mean, purposeful stance. And it is Ninja fast, with a new 1,043cc inline-four that puts out triple-digit horsepower and is tuned for more torque than your typical sportbike screamer. But best of all, this modern Ninja calls out to me like my old friend, with more focused capabilities that weren’t readily apparent in my sturdy GPz.

The $12,399 2020 Ninja 1000SX is both a sport-riding and a sport-touring platform with a definite emphasis on sport, but Kawasaki has also embraced and expanded its touring acumen. Hard bags that use a slick low-profile mounting system are an OEM option, the quick-release windscreen adjusts across four settings, there are four seat options, and the SX has been retooled digitally for open-road riding including, at long last, electronic cruise control (the real kind, not the plastic throttle lock I used on my ‘86 Ninja). But it’s also designed to be a competent back-roads tool, including a new clutchless quick shifter and slipper clutch, giving riders the ability to scratch an itch in both worlds.

For 2020, Kawasaki has also upped the tech quotient to a large degree over the 2019 model. The KIBS ABS smart braking system is now standard, and a new Bosch inertial module adds more safety options to the braking and acceleration parts of the ride, including a novel new cornering management system. For pilots wanting less tech intervention, certain aspects of the system, such as the three-level traction control, can be set to “off.” Incredibly, the Bosch IMU doing all that thinking for you only weighs a scant 40 grams, or about as much as a handful of paperclips. There are also expanded ride modes including Sport, Rain and Road, as well as a custom Rider mode where you can set up your own favorite profile. Parameters within riding modes can be adjusted as well and everything can be set up on the bike’s new 4.3-inch TFT color cockpit display, or through the Kawasaki Rideology smartyphone app. As I recall, my Top Gun Ninja had a gas gauge, which I thought was pretty damn trick at the time. I taped an LCD clock from the dollar store to the tach to really take things to the next level. Ah, the carbureted days…

To be sure, the 2020 NinjaSX is a smart-looking bike, and Kawasaki’s engineers have tweaked the fairing for better airflow, as well as moving from a two-pipe muffler layout to a more sporty (and lighter weight) single-sided affair more in tune with its pure sportbike brethren.

Probably my only complaint is the color scheme, which is a natty grey and black scheme with Kawi-green accent stripes (as above) as the only option, at least so far. Come on, Kawasaki, find some old cans of Ninja red, white and blue paint already!

Once the world starts turning again, the new Ninja 1000SX should be available in Kawasaki showrooms, and it’s only a $200 bump over the old model.

Organizers cancel Memorial Day motorcycle ride in Washington

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By NIKKI WENTLING from https://www.stripes.com

WASHINGTON – A motorcycle rally in the nation’s capital, designed to replace the popular Rolling Thunder event, won’t happen on Memorial Day weekend because of the coronavirus pandemic, organizers announced Tuesday night.

AMVETS took over plans for a motorcycle ride through Washington after Rolling Thunder organizers announced that 2019 would be their last event. Rolling Thunder, a 32-year-old tradition, attracted hundreds of thousands of participants every Memorial Day weekend.

AMVETS planned a similar event, Rolling to Remember, for the weekend of May 23.

“As always, the health and safety of our riders and the veteran community is our top priority,” AMVETS said in a statement. “Due to the federal and state restrictions on public gathers and the guidance of the public health officials amid the Covid-19 pandemic, the Rolling to Remember motorcycle demonstration will not take place in Washington, D.C.”

The goal of the three-day event was to focus on raising awareness for prisoners of war and troops still missing in action, as well as the issue of veterans suicide.

Instead of the in-person ride and rally, AMVETS asked motorcyclists to ride 22 miles on May 24 in their local communities, while following social distancing guidelines. The 22 miles recognizes an often-cited statistic that 22 veterans die by suicide every day. Participants can download a phone app titled “REVER” to track and share their ride.

The weekend Rolling to Remember activities were expected to kick off May 22 with “Blessing of the Bikes” at the Washington National Cathedral. AMVETS was working with the National Park Service to have a stage on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial with speakers and other programming. Then, on May 24, motorcyclists were scheduled to ride past the White House, the Capitol Building, around the National Mall and stop at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall.

The estimated cost of the weekend event, which was free for participants, was $400,000.

AMVETS said they would continue planning an event in Washington for 2021.

“We appreciate your support and flexibility during an unprecedented time in our nation’s history,” AMVETS said. “We look forward to coming together, even stronger than before, to continue this important tradition in person in 2021.”

Yamaha’s GNCC University Scheduled to Return for 2020

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from https://motorcycles.einnews.com/

Experts Offer Training for Aspiring ATV and Motorcycle Competitors at Snowshoe Mountain Resort

/EIN News/ — MARIETTA, Ga., April 08, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Yamaha Motor Corp., USA’s, annual Grand National Cross Country (GNCC) University is scheduled to return to Snowshoe Mountain Resort in West Virginia this June 24 to 26 during the 2020 GNCC series. While the racing season has been postponed, Yamaha remains committed to bringing back this inspiring and educational hands-on event for up-and-coming racers when the race series resumes.

“We are looking forward to another great GNCC University this year and are working closely with Racer Productions and Snowshoe Mountain Resort to ensure we are not only prepared to host a successful event per the current schedule, but we do so appropriately and safely based on current conditions,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports group marketing manager. “A primary reason this event is so popular with attendees is because it affords ambitious amateur riders the opportunity to grow their skill set with the help of seasoned pros and champions. They are then able to put their learnings into practice that same weekend at one of the most challenging GNCC races of the year.”

“I look forward to GNCC University at the Snowshoe Campus every year,” said Tim Cotter, GNCC University’s Dean of Dirt. “The University promotes a unique learning environment for off-road riders paired with the best athletes in the world. Their classroom is a 10,000-acre lab with every kind of obstacle you can imagine, allowing the GNCC University attendees to substantially improve their off-road riding performance upon graduating.”

A panel of current and pastime Yamaha racing champions and professionals will instruct as many as 80 total students in either ATV- or motorcycle-related sessions. Celebrating 26 years of racing at a pro-level, XC1 Pro ATV rider Johnny Gallagher will lead this year’s Yamaha Racing ATV instructors, along with five-time GNCC XC1 Pro ATV champion – and current undefeated series leader – Walker Fowler, and 12-time WXC ATV champion Traci Pickens. The two-wheel class will be led by seven-time AMA National Enduro Champion and AmPro Yamaha Racing team owner Randy Hawkins, five-time AMA National Hare Scramble Champion Jason Raines, XC1 Open Pro motorcycle rider Layne Michael, XC2 250 Pro motorcycle rider Michael Witkowski, along with the WXC bike competitors Rachael Archer and current unbeaten series leader Becca Sheets.

During the GNCC University, students will participate in lectures about sportsmanship, training, proper nutrition, and mental preparation, along with practicing how to tackle hills, grass tracks, woods, rocks, mud, and starts in a competitive setting. Groups will be determined according to bike size and rider skill level to ensure everyone is learning with comparable peers.

Reservations are on a first-come, first-serve basis with 80 openings evenly split between ATV and motorcycle disciplines. Tuition for GNCC University starts at $300 per student. To be the first in line for registration information on the 2020 Yamaha GNCC University, message @YamahaOutdoors on Instagram or Facebook.

For more information on the bLU cRU program, including all guidelines and requirements for ATV, SxS, and Off-Road Motorcycle racing, visit YamahabLUcRU.com. To view the entire Proven Off-Road ATV, SxS, and Off-Road Motorcycle lineup and learn more, visit YamahaMotorsports.com. Connect with Yamaha on social media via @YamahaOutdoors or search the following hashtags on all platforms: #Yamaha #YamahaRacing #REALizeYourPodium #REALizeYourAdventure #ProvenOffRoad #bLUcRU #AssembledInUSA #Yamaha10YearBelt #YXZ1000R #YFZ450R #YZ125X #YZ250X #YZ250FX #YZ450FX